Home / Tech News / ​The Apple TV lesson: You can’t hurry R&D, you’ll just have to wait

​The Apple TV lesson: You can’t hurry R&D, you’ll just have to wait

To paraphrase the Surpremes, R&D can’t be hurried and it’s a game of give and take. Apple tells Icahn to cool his jets over an Apple TV, which reportedly was scrapped.

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​The Apple TV lesson: You can’t hurry R&D, you’ll just have to wait

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Propelling deep space flight with a new fuel source, Momentus prepares for liftoff

Mikhail Kokorich, the founder of Momentus , a new Y Combinator-backed propulsion technology developer for space flight, hadn’t always dreamed of going to the moon. A physicist who graduated from Russia’s top-ranked Novosibirsk University, Kokorich was a serial entrepreneur in who grew up in Siberia and made his name and his first fortunes in the years after the fall of the Soviet Union. The heart of Momentus’ technology is a new propulsion system that uses water as a propellant instead of chemicals. Image courtesy Momentus Using water has several benefits, Kokorich says. One, it’s a fuel source that’s abundant in outer space, and it’s ultimately better and more efficient fuel for flight beyond low earth orbit. “If you move something with a chemical booster stage to the moon. Chemical propulsion is good when you need to have a very high thrust,” according to Kokorich. Once a ship gets beyond gravity’s pull, water simply works better, he says. Some companies are trying to guide micro-satellites with technologies like Phase 4 which use ionized gases like Xenon, but according to Kokorich those are more expensive and slower. “When ionized propulsion is used for geostationary satellites to orbit, it takes months,” says Kokorich, using water can half the time. “We can carry ten tons to geostationary orbit and it’s much faster,” says Kokorich. The company has already signed an agreement with ECM Space, a European launch services provider, which will provide the initial trip for the company’s first test of its propulsion system on a micro-satellite — slated for early 2019. That first product, “Zeal,” has specific impulses of 150 to 180 seconds and power up to 30 watts

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