Home / Tech News / As attendees of Defcon’s Voting Village, including an 11-year-old, successfully hack voting machines, vendors and officials try to downplay the…

As attendees of Defcon’s Voting Village, including an 11-year-old, successfully hack voting machines, vendors and officials try to downplay the…

Kevin Collier / BuzzFeed News : As attendees of Defcon’s Voting Village, including an 11-year-old, successfully hack voting machines, vendors and officials try to downplay the problems   —  Veteran hackers have tried for years to get the world to notice flaws in voting machines.  Now that they’ve got it, they have to wrestle with scaring people away from voting.

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As attendees of Defcon’s Voting Village, including an 11-year-old, successfully hack voting machines, vendors and officials try to downplay the…

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What happens when hackers steal your SIM? You learn to keep your crypto offline

A year ago I felt a panic that still reverberates in me today. Hackers swapped my T-Mobile SIM card without my approval and methodically shut down access to most of my accounts and began reaching out to my Facebook friends asking to borrow crypto. Their social engineering tactics, to be clear, were laughable but they could have been catastrophic if my friends were less savvy. Flash forward a year and the same thing happened to me again – my LTE coverage winked out at about 9pm and it appeared that my phone was disconnected from the network. Panicked, I rushed to my computer to try to salvage everything I could before more damaged occurred. It was a false alarm but my pulse went up and I broke out in a cold sweat. I had dealt with this once before and didn’t want to deal with it again. Sadly, I probably will. And you will, too. The SIM card swap hack is still alive and well and points to one and only one solution: keeping your crypto (and almost your entire life) offline. Trust No Carrier Stories about massive SIM-based hacks are all over. Most recently a crypto PR rep and investor, Michael Terpin, lost $24 million to hackers who swapped his AT&T SIM. Terpin is suing the carrier for $224 million . This move, which could set a frightening precedent for carriers, accuses AT&T of “of fraud and gross negligence.” From Krebs : Terpin alleges that on January 7, 2018, someone requested an unauthorized SIM swap on his AT&T account, causing his phone to go dead and sending all incoming texts and phone calls to a device the attackers controlled. Armed with that access, the intruders were able to reset credentials tied to his cryptocurrency accounts and siphon nearly $24 million worth of digital currencies

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