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Walgreens Planning for October 18 Apple Pay Launch (Juli Clover/MacRumors)

An internal memo addressed to Walgreens employees designed to prepare them for the upcoming launch of Apple Pay suggests that Apple's new payments service might be going live on Saturday, October 18. A Saturday launch is unusual, but it could make sense as Apple Pay is designed for in-store shopping and a weekend debut would give customers time to try the service. It is, however, also possible that Apple Pay will go live shortly before the October 18 date, following the company's Thursday, October 16 iPad event, with support coming to Walgreens a day or two later. At its October 16 event, Apple is expected to debut a new iPad Air, Retina iMacs, and possibly a new Retina iPad mini. The event, which will also likely see Apple previewing OS X Yosemite one last time before its public debut, would also be an opportune time to divulge more information about Apple Pay and possibly even launch the payments service. As announced on September 9, popular drug store Walgreens is one of Apple's major launch partners, along with other companies like McDonalds, Macy's, Staples, and more. According to the Walgreens memo, customers who have an iPhone 6 will be able to use Apple Pay in Walgreens stores by tapping their devices "to the upper portion of the pinpad to pay for their purchase." Earlier this week, USAA assistant vice president Vikram Parekh suggested the bank would begin supporting Apple Pay on November 7, leading many to believe the service might see an official launch on that date, but it is possible that USAA and other banks may roll out support at different times following the launch of Apple Pay. Apple originally promised an October launch for Apple Pay when it unveiled the service. Apple Pay will be enabled on iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices through an update to iOS 8. iOS 8.1, which has already been seeded to developers , includes hidden Apple Pay settings and set up screens . With Apple Pay set to launch on or around the time of Apple's October 16 event, that also means we should be seeing iOS 8.1 at that time as well.

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Citizenfour, Laura Poitras’ documentary about Snowden, confirms a second leaker (Spencer Ackerman/Guardian)

Edward Snowden in Moscow. Photograph: Alan Rusbridger/The Guardian Citizenfour must have been a maddening documentary to film. Its subject is pervasive global surveillance, an enveloping digital act that spreads without visibility, so its scenes unfold in courtrooms, hearing chambers and hotels. Yet the virtuosity of Laura Poitras, its director and architect, makes its 114 minutes crackle with the nervous energy of revelation. Poitras, the first journalist contacted by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden , mirrors her topic. She rarely appears on news programs or chat shows. She is a mysterious character in her own movie, heard more than she is seen. But surreptitiously, Poitras has been a commander of a stream of disclosures for 16 months that have forced the NSA into a new and infamous era. Citizenfour demonstrates to the public the prowess that those of us who have worked with her on the NSA stories encountered. Her movie, the culmination of a post-9/11 trilogy that spans a dark horizon from Iraq to Guantánamo, is a triumph of journalism and a triumph for journalism. At its heart, Citizenfour is the story of how Snowden’s disclosures unfolded through Poitras’ eyes, from the first communications Snowden sends Poitras, hinting at what is to come, until Snowden sees himself vindicated through emulation.

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New Images of iPad Air 2 Parts Show Touch ID Home Button Cable, Logic Board With A8X Chip, and More (Richard Padilla/MacRumors)

Apple.club.tw ( Google Translate ) has shared new images that appear to show a variety of components from the iPad Air 2 , which include pictures of the logic board, home button flex cable, front panel, and volume control flex cable. The home button flex cable appears to contain a space for a Touch ID home button, complete with the stainless steel ring. Previous reports claimed that Apple's forthcoming iPads would receive Touch ID functionality, and these newest pictures likely confirm that the feature will at least be on the iPad Air 2. Meanwhile, the logic board image also shows what may be Apple's A8 processor along with RAM chips and other components. Currently, it is unknown as to whether the A8 chip on the iPad Air 2 will be clocked at a higher speed than the A8 chips found on the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus . The logic board also appears to contain a noticeably different layout when compared to the board from last year's iPad Air . For instance, the SIM slot appears to be directly on iPad Air 2's logic board, while the component was located in a separate compartment for the iPad Air. The front panel of the iPad Air 2 contains a more prolonged connector on its side and contains cutouts for the Touch ID home button and FaceTime HD camera. While the panel doesn't appear to be notably different when compared to the front panel for the iPad Air, some reports have claimed that the iPad Air will have an integrated display to make way for a thinner profile. Lastly, the volume control flex cable shows the up and down volume buttons and what may be a microphone. With this layout, it is possible that Apple may be getting rid of the mute/screen rotation switch to further reduce the tablet's overall thickness. Apple is expected to unveil the iPad Air 2 alongside the next-generation Retina iPad mini at a media event in Cupertino, California next Thursday, October 16 .

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Netflix quietly raises its 4K Ultra HD subscription rate to $11.99 from $7.99 (HD Guru)

October 9th, 2014 · 3 Comments · 2160p , Connected TVs , Streaming Services Netflix, the leader in 4K Ultra High Definition streaming services, has raised their rates, while continuing to add more 4K content with the recent additions of The Blacklist and Smurfs 2 . We contacted Netflix today for the details. The Netflix spokesperson contacted via email confirmed that new subscribers, or current subscribers with newly purchased 4K UHD TVs, now will have to pay $11.99 to receive 4K streaming content. This is a $4 increase for HD users that signed on prior to May 9th, 2014. Current subscribers already paying for 4K content (prior to August 12th) will be grandfathered into the older $7.99 a month plan until August 12th, 2016 according to a Netflix customer service representative.  The new 4K plan also permits up to 4 devices to play simultaneously. Netflix raised  the price of its standard HD package from $7.99 to $8.99 for new subscribers on May 9th. Netflix has also solved the problems with Verizon FiOS, now allowing customers of both  broadband providers to consistently play in 3840 x 2160 resolution. TV and Audio Deals Today’s Amazon Deals Best Selling Soundbars and 5.1 Surround Systems Best Selling Blu-ray Players Best Buy’s Hottest Deals   Earlier this year, Netflix was forced to pay fees to Comcast and Verizon for peering agreements to permit their subscribers to be able to stream 4K at the higher speeds needed for viewing. This new price increase is not a surprise, as Netflix’s costs increased with the agreements. Comcast has around 20.6 million broadband subscribers (as of end of 2013 source: Leichtman Research) while Verizon FiOS has 6.2 million (as of Q1 2014 source: Multichannel News).

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How social media firms struggle to balance free speech and safety as women face threats and harassment online (The Atlantic Online)

Under the banner of free speech, companies like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube have been host to rape videos and revenge porn—which makes female users feel anything but free. Illustrations by Jackie Lay In December 2012, an Icelandic woman named Thorlaug Agustsdottir discovered a Facebook group called “Men are better than women.” One image she found there, Thorlaug wrote to us this summer in an email, “was of a young woman naked chained to pipes or an oven in what looked like a concrete basement, all bruised and bloody. She looked with a horrible broken look at whoever was taking the pic of her curled up naked.” Thorlaug wrote an outraged post about it on her own Facebook page. Before long, a user at “Men are better than women” posted an image of Thorlaug’s face, altered to appear bloody and bruised. Under the image, someone commented, “Women are like grass, they need to be beaten/cut regularly.” Another wrote: “You just need to be raped.” Thorlaug reported the image and comments to Facebook and requested that the site remove them. “We reviewed the photo you reported,” came Facebook’s auto reply, “but found it does not violate Facebook’s Community Standards on hate speech, which includes posts or photos that attack a person based on their race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or medical condition.” Instead, the Facebook screeners labeled the content “Controversial Humor.” Thorlaug saw nothing funny about it. She worried the threats were real. Related Story Confronting My Cyberbully, 13 Years Later Some 50 other users sent their own requests on her behalf. All received the same reply. Eventually, on New Year’s Eve, Thorlaug called the local press, and the story spread from there. Only then was the image removed. In January 2013, Wired published a critical account of Facebook’s response to these complaints

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Sprint to shutter WiMAX network around Nov. 6, 2015 (Phil Goldstein/FierceWireless)

Sprint ( NYSE:S ) confirmed it will shut off service on its mobile WIMAX network on or around Nov. 6, 2015, giving further clarity on its network evolution. Sprint spokeswoman Adrienne Norton confirmed the date to  FierceWireless . The date was first unearthed in an internal company email posted by the blog  Android Central . In April, Sprint said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing that it would "cease using WiMAX technology  by the end of 2015." As part of that effort, Sprint said it identified  approximately 6,000 "redundant sites that we expect to decommission and  terminate the underlying leases."  Norton said that dual-band phones with both WiMAX and 3G/CDMA capabilities will continue to work on Sprint's network as 3G-only devices after the WiMAX network is shut down. "Most WiMAX subscribers are upgrade eligible due to the age of their device," she said. "In addition, offers are being planned for targeted postpaid WiMAX subscribers prior to the WiMAX network shutdown." According to the email, Sprint has started notifying corporate-liable accounts about the shutdown and will notify individual-liable accounts and prepaid customers 180 days prior to the shutdown. The email says Sprint will not support any WiMAX service extensions past Nov. 6, 2015. Norton added that Sprint is "encouraging our MVNOs to proactively communicate with their customers about the WiMAX shutdown, notifying them of the impacts and their options. We've also created an online resource center to share ongoing updates, marketing ideas etc. with our MVNOs." One of Sprint's MVNOs, FreedomPop, told  Wireless Week  that it has had an LTE device swap program in place for the past year for customers looking to replace an older WiMAX device. FreedomPop said it currently conducts a few thousand WiMAX device swaps per month. The WiMAX network will be the second network Sprint plans to shut down in as many years. The carrier shut down its iDEN Nextel network last year.

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Kmart says hackers have obtained credit and debit card numbers of "potentially" all customers since September (Jim Dalrymple II/BuzzFeed)

2. Kmart says customer credit card numbers were exposed after criminals used malware to infiltrate the company’s data system. Sears, which owns Kmart, said Friday the data breach began in early September and involved “a form of malware” that current anti-virus systems couldn’t pick up. A separate note on Kmart’s website described the malware as “similar to a computer virus. Sears spokesman Howard Riefs told BuzzFeed News Friday that additional information about the malware is not yet available. The breach was detected by the company’s security team Thursday. The team removed the malware, but not before debit and credit card numbers were compromised. Riefs did not say how large the breach was, but when asked if it included everyone who shopped at Kmart between September and Thursday, he responded that it was “potentially those customers.” The company said the breach did not extend to PIN numbers, email addresses, social security numbers, or other personal information. Customers who shopped online at Kmart.com also weren’t impacted by the breach, the company said. Riefs said investigators are still trying to determine who was responsible for the breach. Sears is encouraging customers who shopped at Kmart during September and early October to reach out to their credit card company if they notice unusual charges. Kmart also is offering credit monitoring protection .

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Tinder Spammers Move To SMS After Improvements To Dating App’s Security (Sarah Perez/TechCrunch)

Dating app Tinder for a long time had been flooded with spam bots – fake accounts that flirt with users in order to redirect them to adult sites, and yes, take their money. This summer, security firm Symantec detailed the spam bot problem , and later, Tinder addressed the issue with a technical update. That update, it appears, was effective at cutting down the in-app spam. However, it didn’t necessarily address the spamming activities themselves. According to a new report, Tinder bot spammers just moved to a new channel: SMS. When Symantec’s report was released, Tinder users could block profiles, but couldn’t report spam. Now, that has changed. Plus, in July, the company rolled out what it described as a “major technical solution to our current spam issue, which should result in measurably less spam and bots than prior,” the company at the time told Mashable . However, a report out this week from Pindrop Security indicates that Tinder’s attempts at curtailing the spam activity on its service hasn’t actually slowed down the higher-level spam campaign, the firm says. The company, which monitors online phone spam complaints in order to identify and analyze new and popular scams, found in early August an emerging scam involving Tinder. Immediately after the Tinder technical update, phone spam complaints skyrocketed. Before August, the company’s Topic Modeler software hadn’t identified any Tinder-related complaints

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iRobot introduces new operating system enabling more autonomous robots for military use (Doug Cameron/Wall Street Journal)

Updated Oct. 9, 2014 12:05 a.m. ET IRobot’s machines, such as the 510 PackBot bomb-disposal robot, are being prepped to start thinking for themselves. iRobot IRobot Corp. IRBT +0.57% iRobot Corp. U.S.: Nasdaq $ 32.00 +0.18 +0.57% Oct. 10, 2014 4:00 pm Volume (Delayed 15m) : 891,055 AFTER HOURS $ 32.00 0.00 % Oct. 10, 2014 4:46 pm Volume (Delayed 15m) : 1,128 P/E Ratio 37.65 Market Cap $940.41 Million Dividend Yield N/A Rev. per Employee $956,157 10/09/14 IRobot Introduces System to He... 09/05/14 Robot Cleaners Enter Japanese ...

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HP to revoke a digital certificate mistakenly used to sign malicious software in May 2010 (Brian Krebs/Krebs on Security)

Computer and software industry maker HP  is in the process of notifying customers about a seemingly harmless security incident in 2010 that nevertheless could prove expensive for the company to fix and present unique support problems for users of its older products. Earlier this week, HP quietly produced several client advisories stating that on Oct. 21, 2014 it plans to revoke a digital certificate the company previously used to cryptographically sign software components that ship with many of its older products. HP said it was taking this step out of an abundance of caution because it discovered that the certificate had mistakenly been used to sign malicious software way back in May 2010. Code-signing is a practice intended to give computer users and network administrators additional confidence about the integrity and security of a file or program. Consequently, private digital certificates that major software vendors use to sign code are highly prized by attackers, because they allow those attackers to better disguise malware as legitimate software. For example, the infamous Stuxnet malware – apparently created as a state-sponsored project to delay Iran’s nuclear ambitions — contained several components that were digitally signed with certificates that had been stolen from well-known companies. In previous cases where a company’s private digital certificates have been used to sign malware, the incidents were preceded by highly targeted attacks aimed at stealing the certificates. In Feb. 2013, whitelisting software provider Bit9 discovered that digital certificates stolen from a developer’s system had been used to sign malware that was sent to several customers who used the company’s software. But according to HP’s Global Chief Information Security Officer Brett Wahlin , nothing quite so sexy or dramatic was involved in HP’s decision to revoke this particular certificate

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