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Bloomberg $20K+/year terminals have a classifieds section called POSH (Sapna Maheshwari/BuzzFeed)

There's A Little-Known Craigslist Just For Rich People This BuzzFeed homepage is tailored for our readers in the USA. Make it your default. This BuzzFeed homepage is tailored for our readers in the USA. Switch to US Have you seen BuzzFeed English? Come check it out!   CHOOSE YOUR BUZZ WORK PLAY Your Post Has Been Launched! Fabulous! Don't forget to share with your friends on Twitter and Facebook. 1. The Bloomberg terminal is an expensive Wall Street trading and research machine with lots of financial data. It has its own version of Craigslist, called POSH. Brendan Mcdermid / Reuters / Reuters 2. Prices tend to be higher than what you’d find in typical classifieds sections, with goods such as vast estates, boats, Rolexes, diamond rings, and expensive cars. Bloomberg terminal screen grab They’re mostly listed by bankers, hedge fund managers, private-equity types, and their friends. 3

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Adobe Partners With Google To Release Open-Source Font For Chinese, Japanese And Korean Languages (Frederic Lardinois/TechCrunch)

Adobe and Google today announced the launch of a new open-source font for Chinese, Japanese and Korean (CJK) languages that covers 65,535 glyphs, making it one — if not the — largest font to cover these languages. The font, which was optimized for both print and screen, is now available for free through Google Fonts and through Adobe’s Typekit, where it is included in the free tier. For reasons surely only the respective companies’ marketing departments understand, Adobe will call the font Source Han Sans while Google will release its own version of the font under the name Noto Sans CJK . It will also be available through Adobe’s SourceForge and GitHub repositories and the company will make subsets of the font available to those who only need support for a specific language. By default, the font supports Japanese, Traditional Chinese (including Taiwan and Hong Kong SAR), Simplified Chinese and Korean (with hangul syllables), as well as Greek, Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. Having Adobe and Google work together on an open-source font may seem somewhat unusual. Adobe’s principal product manager for type Caleb Belohlavek told me last week that the two companies actually started talking about this project about four years ago. Building a pan-CJK font was something Adobe had been wanting to do for a while and something Google thought would be useful for its own products and its developer community. For Google, this had to be an open-source project, and while that wasn’t always in the nature of Adobe, the company had already started working on its open source font at the time. Eventually, the two companies decided to pool their resources to get this project off the ground. Belohlavek tells me that once the project got off the ground, Adobe’s Tokyo-based Senior Designer Ryoko Nishizuka started working on the overall design of the font, which Belohlavek described to me as “simple in style will retain the elegance of a traditional sans design for Asian characters.” This, apparently, was quite a daunting task, given that many of these glyphs may have up to four different regional variations. Adobe tells me that the other issues the designers faced was to ensure that the font will harmonize well with Google’s existing Roboto and Noto Sans families and Adobe’s own Source Sans Latin glyphs. Adobe handled most of the initial design, and Google contributed to the project’s direction and provided the funding for much of the second part of the project, which involved shipping the initial design to partners in Japan, China and Korea to finalize the fonts. While each of these languages is based on historical Chinese forms, they have all morphed into different systems over time, with additional (often subtle) regional variants, all of which have to be accounted for in a font like this

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Chinese Hackers Extend Reach to Smaller U.S. Agencies, Officials Say (Michael S. Schmidt/New York Times)

HTTP/1.1 302 Found Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 03:27:48 GMT Server: Apache Set-Cookie: NYT-S=deleted; expires=Thu, 01-Jan-1970 00:00:01 GMT; path=/; domain=www.stg.nytimes.com Set-Cookie: NYT-S=0MGKsjKbloUCjDXrmvxADeHAKZ60BLDlzldeFz9JchiAIUFL2BEX5FWcV.Ynx4rkFI; expires=Fri, 15-Aug-2014 03:27:48 GMT; path=/; domain=.nytimes.com Location: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/16/world/asia/chinese-hackers-extend-reach-in-us-government.html?_r=0 Content-Length: 0 nnCoection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 HTTP/1.1 200 OK Server: Apache Cache-Control: no-cache Channels: NytNow Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8 Content-Length: 63399 Accept-Ranges: bytes Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 03:27:48 GMT X-Varnish: 1489018491 Age: 0 Via: 1.1 varnish X-Cache: MISS X-API-Version: 5-5 X-PageType: article Connection: close Sections Home Search Skip to content Skip to navigation View mobile version Asia Pacific | Chinese Hackers Extending Reach to Smaller U.S. Agencies, Officials Say http://nyti.ms/W7f5lO See next articles See previous articles Asia Pacific | ​ ​NYT Now Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story Share This Page Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story WASHINGTON — After years of cyberattacks on the networks of high-profile government targets like the Pentagon, Chinese hackers appear to have turned their attention to far more obscure federal agencies. Law enforcement and cybersecurity analysts in March detected intrusions on the computer networks of the Government Printing Office and the Government Accountability Office, senior American officials said this week. The printing office catalogs and publishes information for the White House, Congress and many federal departments and agencies. It also prints passports for the State Department. The accountability office, known as the congressional watchdog, investigates federal spending and the effectiveness of government programs. Continue reading the main story Related Coverage U.S. Case Offers Glimpse Into China’s Hacker Army MAY 22, 2014 5 in China Army Face U.S. Charges of Cyberattacks MAY 19, 2014 The attacks occurred around the same time Chinese hackers breached the networks of the Office of Personnel Management , which houses the personal information of all federal employees and more detailed information on tens of thousands of employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances. Some of those networks were so out of date that the hackers seemed confused about how to navigate them, officials said. But the intrusions puzzled American officials because hackers have usually targeted offices that have far more classified information. It is not clear whether the hackers were operating on behalf of the Chinese government. But the sophisticated nature of the attacks has led some American officials to believe that the government, which often conducts cyberattacks through the military or proxies, played a role

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Samsung In Talks To Scoop Up SmartThings For Around $200 Million (Alexia Tsotsis/TechCrunch)

Google has Nest, Apple has HomeKit and Samsung has… SmartThings , we’re hearing. The deal was completed for around $200 million dollars, though it might have been less according to one source. (Update: The deal is not done yet, says another.) SmartThings is in the home automation space , and allows you to connect devices like lights and doorlocks to a system controlled by your mobile phone. It has raised over $15 million from investors including Greylock, Highland Capital, First Round Capital, SV Angel, Lerer Ventures, Yuri Milner’s Start Fund, David Tisch, A-Grade Investments, CrunchFund* and Box Group. Samsung most likely bought the startup to get out ahead of Google’s Nest efforts. With this buy, Samsung obtains a mature home automation platform that just needs some marketing help. And Samsung has a hefty marketing budget . The larger arena at work here is the millions of connected devices that will populate our world — commonly referred to as the internet of things. In a nearly inevitable future where every device in our home has a live connection to the web, and can be controlled by our devices, device manufacturers are the ones most uniquely poised to offer holistic solutions to consumers. At least, that’s the marketing line. In reality, this is a sort of protocol pissing contest, with all of the majors duking it out to be the first to own your home and data. What they do with that data will depend on the player. Google might enhance its services (and web advertising); Amazon will try to sell you more stuff , more accurately; Apple will likely continue to utilize privacy as a differentiation, pointing out that it has no interest in your information as long as you keep buying its hardware.

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VentureBeat raises $2.6 million to launch ‘App Store’ for research (Cromwell Schubarth/Silicon Valley …)

Jul 14, 2014, 12:11pm PDT Updated: Jul 14, 2014, 3:46pm PDT Enlarge Photo Tech news site VentureBeat disclosed that it has raised $2.6 million in new funding. Cromwell Schubarth Senior Technology Reporter- Silicon Valley Business Journal Email  |  Twitter  |  Google+ VentureBeat, the Silicon Valley technology news site, has raised $2.6 million to fund an "App Store"-style marketplace for industry research. The San Francisco-based media company said it will launch VB Insight in three to five weeks. A preview site shows reports for sale from analysts on marketing automation, mobile developers and digital advertising. The prices range from about $200 to about $2,500. Content providers will get 70 percent of the revenue from sales of their reports and VentureBeat will get 30 percent, according to John Koetsier , product vice president at VentureBeat. "We have wanted to do a research product for a long time," he told me on Monday. "If you are an online content site and rely only on advertising, it has its challenges. You are at the mercy of the page view. Events like the conferences we do are one way to diversify, and this is another." People who buy reports will be able to rate and comment on them, much as buyers of iTunes or Google Play apps can comment on that content. All research providers will be vetted before they can sell on VB Insight and all material will be edited and curated, Koetsier said. "We are going to be more like Apple than Google in that sense." Content providers will also be given the opportunity to provide free streams of research and information on the site

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Sling’s ‘M1’ streaming box brings built-in WiFi at a lower price (Dana Wollman/Engadget)

It's been nearly two years since Sling unveiled new placeshifting boxes, so it's high time the company brought its products into the year 2014. The firm just announced two refreshes, including the entry-level M1, which has a smaller footprint and comes with built-in WiFi so that you don't need to park the thing near an Ethernet cable to stream live and DVR'd TV to your mobile devices. Additionally, it can now be configured using the Android/iOS app, though unfortunately, you need to use old-school component cables (maybe in the year 2016 they'll add HDMI). On the software side, meanwhile, Sling is bringing back its Mac and PC desktop apps, since users seemed to miss it. Most importantly, it's cheaper: The M1 costs $150, compared with $180 for the Slingbox 350 it's replacing. Meanwhile, the Slingbox 500 has been renamed the "SlingTV," though the design and price ($300) remain unchanged. But while the hardware is the same, the UI has gotten a major overhaul, with a new gallery view that's a little prettier (and potentially easier to navigate) than your typical TV grid. In particular, the new software now shows live sports scores and stats, courtesy of Thuuz . (Gotta hand it to Sling for knowing its audience: men who love sports and are away from home a lot.) The downside to this new look, though, is that Sling has to start all over again in getting developers to make apps for the Slingbox. Indeed, at launch there will only be two channels, including Blockbuster on Demand. So, here's hoping Sling can work with the Netflixes of the world to build custom apps, and soon. Speaking of apps, Sling also made some updates to its various mobile applications, which you can use to either stream content from your Sling box, or send it to a set-top box like a Roku or Apple TV. For starters, the iPad app can now send video Roku to players; previously, only the iPhone and Android apps could do this. Also, regardless of which platform you use, the apps are now capable of what's known as a "full handoff," which is to say you can safely exit the app once you've sent the video to an Apple TV or Roku box.

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House Votes To Make ISP Tax Moratorium Permanent (Multichannel News)

  The House Tuesday passed a bill that would make permanent the ban on taxing Internet access. A temporary ban has been regularly renewed since it was first adopted in 1998, but this bill would make that ban permanent. As currently constituted, it would also remove the grandfathering of ISP taxes on a handful of states, though that could change in a Senate version or conference between the two bills. The passage of H.R. 3086, the Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA), came on a voice vote without the reps. having to record their votes. But that easy passage belied some of the strong opposition to the bill in floor speeches before the vote, particularly from representatives of grandfathered states. Arguments for the permanent moratorium included that it was saving consumers from discriminatory taxes that could disproportionately affect the poor and discourage broadband use. Arguments against included that it was preempting states' rights to determine the best way to raise money and to "fill the potholes and clean the streets." The Internet Tax Freedom Act has been extended three times since 1998. It is currently scheduled to expire Nov.

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