Home / Gadgets / CES 2018 Honda

CES 2018 Honda

Honda 3E Robotics Concept

Honda the power of dreams

Honda introduced its 3E (Empower, Experience, Empathy) Robotics Concept at CES 2018, demonstrating a range of experimental technologies engineered to understand people’s needs and make their lives better. “Empower” represents Honda’s concept that robotics and people can work together while leveraging each other’s strengths. The 3E-D18 is an autonomous off-road workhorse device utilizing AI to support people in a broad range of activities. Designed by Honda R&D Americas, 3E-D18 can be outfitted with an electric-powered drivetrain and can accommodate a multitude of attachments, bringing efficiencies and increasing safety for public, commercial, and consumer enterprises.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/Honda
Twitter: www.twitter.com/Honda

*Content Provided and Sponsored by Honda.

About kanmg

Check Also

Hackers infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

Enlarge / A Linksys WRVS4400N, one of more than a dozen network devices targeted by VPNFilter. (credit: Linksys ) Hackers, possibly working for an advanced nation, have infected more than 500,000 home and small-office routers around the world with malware that can be used to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command, researchers at Cisco warned Wednesday. VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory . It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed. Expansive platform serving multiple needs “We assess with high confidence that this malware is used to create an expansive, hard-to-attribute infrastructure that can be used to serve multiple operational needs of the threat actor,” Cisco researcher William Largent wrote. “Since the affected devices are legitimately owned by businesses or individuals, malicious activity conducted from infected devices could be mistakenly attributed to those who were actually victims of the actor. The capabilities built into the various stages and plugins of the malware are extremely versatile and would enable the actor to take advantage of devices in multiple ways.” Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *