Home / Tech News / Fitbit says Charge skin irritation issues aren’t caused by the device’s materials (Billy Steele/Engadget)

Fitbit says Charge skin irritation issues aren’t caused by the device’s materials (Billy Steele/Engadget)

Fitbit is no stranger to customer complaints, especially when it comes to skin issues . After dealing with a wave of criticism, and subsequent recall, of its Force activity tracker last year, the company recently introduced a trio of new gadgets . Well, early adopters are already crying foul with reports of irritation after using the Fitbit Charge. The company offered an explanation, maintaining that it remedied the issue that plagued the Force by using new materials to construct the products. “We have conducted extensive testing with laboratories and consulted with top dermatologists to develop stringent standards so that users can safely wear and enjoy Charge,” says CEO and co-founder James Park. So what’s the cause of the issue this time? It turns out that it boils down to good habits and proper hygiene. If you’ll recall, a dermatologist we spoke with last year cited skin irritation due to the build up of moisture (water, sweat, etc.) and the resulting bacterial growth as a common issue with watchbands, rings and the like. “The reactions we are seeing with Charge are not uncommon with jewelry or wearable devices that stay in contact with the skin for extended periods,” Park explains. Fitbit says that it received only a handful of complaints from the “over hundred thousand” devices sold so far. The company recommends that you keep the Charge (and any wearable, really) clean and dry, wearing it loosely on your wrist and giving your skin a break from time to time. Of course, gadgets that feature heart-rate tracking need to fit snug, so you’ll want to loosen those after a workout.

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Fitbit says Charge skin irritation issues aren’t caused by the device’s materials (Billy Steele/Engadget)

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