Home / Tech News / Google modifies First Click Free policy, lowers access from five to three free articles per day from Google Search and Google News (John…

Google modifies First Click Free policy, lowers access from five to three free articles per day from Google Search and Google News (John…

Around ten years ago when we introduced a policy called “First Click Free,” it was hard to imagine that the always-on, multi-screen, multiple device world we now live in would change content consumption so much and so fast. The spirit of the First Click Free effort was – and still is – to help users get access to high quality news with a minimum of effort, while also ensuring that publishers with a paid subscription model get discovered in Google Search and via Google News. In 2009, we updated the FCF policy to allow a limit of five articles per day, in order to protect publishers who felt some users were abusing the spirit of this policy. Recently we have heard from publishers about the need to revisit these policies to reflect the mobile, multiple device world. Today we are announcing a change to the FCF limit to allow a limit of three articles a day . This change will be valid on both Google Search and Google News. Google wants to play its part in connecting users to quality news and in connecting publishers to users. We believe the FCF is important in helping achieve that goal, and we will periodically review and update these policies as needed so they continue to benefit users and publishers alike. We are listening and always welcome feedback. Questions and answers about First Click Free Q: Do the rest of the old guidelines still apply? A: Yes, please check the guidelines for Google News as well as the guidelines for Web Search and the associated blog post for more information. Q: Can I apply First Click Free to only a section of my site / only for Google News (or only for Web Search)? A: Sure! Just make sure that both Googlebot and users from the appropriate search results can view the content as required

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Google modifies First Click Free policy, lowers access from five to three free articles per day from Google Search and Google News (John…

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