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Ripple’s Brad Garlinghouse and Michael Arrington to talk cryptocurrency at Disrupt SF

Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse and Arrington XRP Capital founder (and TechCrunch founder) Michael Arrington will be joining us at T echCrunch Disrupt SF in September to talk money. Garlinghouse has had a long and storied career in the tech industry, serving as a Senior Vice President at Yahoo!, President of Consumer Applications at AOL, and CEO of the file collaboration service Hightail. But in 2016, Garlinghouse was promoted from COO to CEO at payment services company Ripple . Ripple’s goal is to try to make it as easy as possible to transfer money between two stores of value. Right now, that process is incredibly tedious, with no unifying structure to send money overseas or to underbanked communities. The notion of a unifying ledger is not a new one, but it’s one that’s transformed Ripple into a full-fledged company. But Ripple also created the world’s third-largest digital token, XRP. The token has a current total market cap around $30 billion, and the company is working to expand the use cases for XRP , which has primarily been marketed as a tool for banks but has only attracted cross-border payment services. As cryptocurrencies continue to evolve and gain mainstream attention, questions continue to mount around how these tokens will revolutionize the economy and gain utility. TechCrunch founder and former Editor-In-Chief Michael Arrington will join Garlinghouse on stage to discuss the evolution of cryptocurrencies. Arrington left TechCrunch in 2011 and went on to start CrunchFund, which has invested in big name startups such as Uber, Airbnb, and Yammer. In 2016, Arrington reduced his role at CrunchFund and has since started Arrington XRP Capital , a $100 million digital asset management firm in blockchain-based capital markets. Ripple is one of the first portfolio companies for Arrington XRP Capital. This comes at a time when the SEC is doing everything it can to learn more about cryptocurrencies, sending out subpoenas to crypto funds far and wide, including Arrington XRP Capital . This conversation is sure to be an interesting one, and one you won’t want to miss

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Ripple’s Brad Garlinghouse and Michael Arrington to talk cryptocurrency at Disrupt SF

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New hacks siphon private cryptocurrency keys from airgapped wallets

Enlarge / Simplified figurative process of a Cryptocurrency transaction. (credit: Mikael Häggström / Wikimedia ) Researchers have defeated a key protection against cryptocurrency theft with a series of attacks that transmit private keys out of digital wallets that are physically separated from the Internet and other networks. Like most of the other attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University professor Mordechai Guri and his colleagues, the currency wallet exploits start with the already significant assumption that a device has already been thoroughly compromised by malware. Still, the research is significant because it shows that even when devices are airgapped—meaning they aren't connected to any other devices to prevent the leaking of highly sensitive data—attackers may still successfully exfiltrate the information. Past papers have defeated airgaps using a wide array of techniques, including electromagnetic emissions from USB devices , radio signals from a computer's video card , infrared capabilities in surveillance cameras , and sounds produced by hard drives . On Monday, Guri published a new paper that applies the same exfiltration techniques to "cold wallets," which are not stored on devices connected to the Internet. The most effective techniques take only seconds to siphon a 256-bit Bitcoin key from a wallet running on an infected computer, even though the computer isn't connected to any network. Guri said the possibility of stealing keys that protect millions or billions of dollars is likely to take the covert exfiltration techniques out of the nation-state hacking realm they currently inhabit and possibly bring them into the mainstream. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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