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Best Commands for Google Home: The Essential – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Best Commands for Google Home: The Essential Ubergizmo Google Home, powered by Google Assistant, is one of the most popular voice assistants, along with Amazon's Echo. Powered by Google Assistant, the device can make your life much easier by delivering tons information without a lot of effort from your end. and more »

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It’s official: Brexit campaign broke the law — with social media’s help

The UK’s Electoral Commission has published the results of a near nine-month-long investigation into Brexit referendum spending and has found that the official Vote Leave campaign broke the law by breaching election campaign spending limits. Vote Leave broke the law including by channeling money to a Canadian data firm, AggregateIQ, to use for targeting political advertising on Facebook’s platform, via undeclared joint working with another Brexit campaign, BeLeave, it found. Aggregate IQ remains the subject of a  separate joint investigation by privacy watchdogs in Canada and British Columbia. The Electoral Commission’s investigation found evidence that BeLeave spent more than £675,000 with AggregateIQ under a common arrangement with Vote Leave. Yet the two campaigns had failed to disclose on their referendum spending returns that they had a common plan. As the designated lead leave campaign, Vote Leave had a £7M spending limit under UK law. But via its joint spending with BeLeave the Commission determined it actually spent £7,449,079 — exceeding the legal spending limit by almost half a million pounds. The June 2016 referendum in the UK resulted in a narrow 52:48 majority for the UK to leave the European Union. Two years on from the vote, the government has yet to agree a coherent policy strategy to move forward in negotiations with the EU, leaving businesses to suck up ongoing uncertainty and society and citizens to remain riven and divided. Vote Leave cheated. The country was cheated.

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Long-hidden hackers unmasked by US special counsel – KFDX

Long-hidden hackers unmasked by US special counsel KFDX PARIS (AP) - On the morning of March 19, 2016, Den Katenberg ran a little test with big stakes. The previous week, Katenberg's hacking crew had been bombarding the Hillary Clinton campaign's email accounts with fake Google warnings, trying to get her ... and more »

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Coinbase teases new cryptocurrency assets for which it’s ‘exploring’ support

Coinbase is taking a look at some new cryptocurrencies to add to its exchange. The list is kind of a pre-announcement, with the startup saying that it’s “exploring” adding the assets and is working with local banks and regulators to make them happen. On the list are… Cardano (ADA) Basic Attention Token (BAT) Stellar Lumens (XLM) Zcash (ZEC) 0x (ZRX) Coinbase is one of the most popular exchange companies and holds quite a bit of sway in directing attention and enthusiasm within the broader blockchain/cryptocurrency space, so the exploration announcement is sure to bring some added interest to these particular assets. Last month, the site announced it was adding Ethereum Classic to the exchange, though in a blog post published today, Coinbase notes that while adding that asset was relatively straightforward, it’s going to take some regulatory work to add any of these new tokens, further noting that they “cannot guarantee they will be listed for trading.” Coinbase got some flack with the debacle surrounding the rollout of Bitcoin Cash after several users accused the site’s employees of profiting from advanced knowledge of the news after the token’s value swelled preceding the announcement. Announcing this might be a way for Coinbase to just hedge some of that by informing the whole community in an earlier stage of the process in which direction it is looking, even if every asset doesn’t necessarily end up landing on one of the startup’s exchanges.  It’s also a way to prevent speculation and frustration as APIs land on the site that are testing integrations — Coinbase probably doesn’t want people assuming these are guarantees of future support.        Note: We’re having some issues with our timestamp tool. This article was originally published at 1:44pm PT on July 13.

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s brutal education in net neutrality

DC Circuit Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh has been nominated for the position of Supreme Court Justice, and on this occasion I think it warranted that we revisit in detail the sound intellectual thrashing this man suffered at the hands of his colleagues just last year on the topic of the internet and net neutrality. Because Kavanaugh was very, very wrong then and gives every indication that he will take his ignorance unapologetically to the highest court in the land. To set the scene: In 2015 the United States Telecom Association sued the FCC, alleging the Open Internet Order that passed earlier that year, establishing net neutrality as we know it — or rather, knew it — was illegal. This highly watched case was heard late in 2015 and the decision was issued six months later, in June of 2016. DC Circuit Judges Srinivasan, Tatel and Williams ruled against the telecoms, essentially finding that the FCC was well within its jurisdiction in establishing net neutrality rules to begin with, and also that the rule as written was lawful. Unsatisfied with this ruling, the USTA petitioned to have the case reheard “en banc,” meaning with all active circuit judges present. This petition was denied, primarily because the Open Internet Order was by that point in peril of replacement, and new deliberations would as likely as not soon be rendered moot. But two judges had dissenting opinions to bruit, and so the court published them alongside the denial — though unfortunately for them Srinivasan used the same opportunity to demolish their arguments. It would have been better for them, in retrospect, if they had remained silent, rather than raising their profound ignorance like a dirty flag to be mocked and pointed at forever — as we do here today. I covered this disaster in less detail then , because it was only one case and news story among many having to do with net neutrality, and having no official consequences (the motion, after all, was denied) it was only worth touching on in brief. But now, with Kavanaugh ascendant, I feel it is important to resurface his late folly as evidence of his unsuitability for the position to which he has been nominated. His dissent deeply misinterprets multiple Supreme Court decisions, demonstrates a profound lack of understanding about how the industry works and produces absurd results if taken to its logical conclusions. I’ll present Kavanaugh’s arguments in good faith, since they were offered that way, and then summarize their point-by-point demolishment by Srinivasan, the FCC or common sense. Wrong on jurisdiction Kavanaugh’s first argument is that the FCC’s rule is illegal to begin with because it does not have authority to issue it.

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Valley of Genius book excerpt: an oral history of the early days at Google as told by its founders, early employees, advisers, and more (Adam…

Adam Fisher / Vanity Fair : Valley of Genius book excerpt: an oral history of the early days at Google as told by its founders, early employees, advisers, and more   —  A behind-the-scenes account of the most important company on the Internet, from grad-school all-nighters, space tethers, and Burning Man to the …

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Twitter’s CFO clarifies that its second-quarter user metrics won’t be affected by fake account purge

After a Washington Post report last week that Twitter’s fake account purge might affect its second-quarter user numbers, Twitter’s chief financial officer said on Monday that the clean-up will not affect its metrics. In a tweet, Ned Segal explained that most of the suspended accounts were less than 30 days old or caught at sign up and therefore never counted. Some clarifications: most accounts we remove are not included in our reported metrics as they have not been active on the platform for 30 days or more, or we catch them at sign up and they are never counted. https://t.co/nRIGE9EMcf — Ned Segal (@nedsegal) July 9, 2018 He added “If we removed 70M accounts from our reported metrics, you would hear directly from us. This article reflects us getting better at improving the health of the service.” On Friday, the Washington Post reported that Twitter has been suspending more than 1 million accounts a day in recent months, good news for people who have been calling on the platform to get serious about fake accounts that can potentially be used to spread misinformation. According to data reviewed by the newspaper, more than 70 million accounts were suspended in May and June, with that pace continuing in July. But the Washington Post also cited an anonymous source who said the clean up might “result in a rare decline in the number of monthly users” in the quarter that ended on June 30. Twitter’s stock price fell more than 9% to a low of $42.46 on Monday, but has been climbing back up after Segal’s clarification. The company’s next earnings report is scheduled for July 27.

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Facebook was never ephemeral, and now its Stories won’t have to be

Before Snapchat made social media about just today, Facebook made it about forever. The 2011 “Timeline” redesign of the profile and keyword search unlocked your past, encouraging you to curate colorful posts about your life’s top moments. That was actually an inspiration for Snapchat, as its CEO Evan Spiegel wrote in its IPO announcement that “We learned that creativity can be suppressed by the fear of permanence.” Now Facebook is finding a middle ground by optionally unlocking the history of your Stories that otherwise disappear after 24 hours. Facebook will soon begin testing Stories Highlights, the company confirmed to TechCrunch. Similar to Instagram Stories Highlights , it will let you pick your favorite expired photos and videos, compile them into themed collections with titles and cover images and display them on your profile. The change further differentiates Facebook Stories from the Snapchat Stories feature it copied. It’s smart for Facebook, because highly compelling content was disintegrating each day, dragging potential ad views to the grave with it. And for its 150 million daily users, it could make the time we spend obsessing over social media Stories a wiser investment. If you’re going to interrupt special moments to capture them with your phone, the best ones should still pay dividends of self-expression and community connection beyond a day later. Facebook Stories Highlights was first spotted by frequent TechCrunch tipster Jane Manchun Wong , who specializes in generating screenshots of unreleased features out of the APK files of Android apps. TechCrunch inquired about the feature, and a Facebook spokesperson provided this statement: “People have told us they want a way to highlight and save the Stories that matter most to them.

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China’s Xiaomi makes underwhelming public debut in Hong Kong IPO

China’s Xiaomi, the world’s fifth biggest seller of smartphones, made an underwhelming public debut after it hit the Hong Kong Stock Exchange amid concerns around an ongoing trade war between the U.S. and China. Media reports in the lead up to today’s bell ringing suggested that eight-year-old Xiaomi was shooting for a valuation of as much as $100 billion . In the end, it had to settle for a more modest $54 billion valuation as it raised $4.7 billion from the IPO. CEO Lei Jun acknowledged that “global capital markets are in constant flux” thanks to tensions between Beijing and the White House, which has seen trade tariffs levied on each side. However, Lei — one of China’s most successful technology entrepreneurs — said that the situation doesn’t diminish his belief in his business. “Although the macroeconomic conditions are far from ideal, we believe a great company can still rise to the challenge and distinguish itself,” he said in a speech at the listing ceremony. Xiaomi enjoyed an understated debut. The stock opened at HK$16.60, below the list price of HK$17, and it quickly fell to HK$16 before later recovering. Its closing share price for the first day of trading was HK$16.78. Data via Hong Kong Stock Exchange Aside from global market concerns, investors are said to have been unsure of Xiaomi’s ecosystem story. The company pitches itself as going beyond devices to offer internet services, such as video streaming, although it has yet to see significant revenue in the services category. Prior to listing, Xiaomi pledged to keep its gross margin to just five percent to ensure that its products are well priced for consumers, but that requires the company to find other ways to monetize and that’s where the services play is aimed. Xiaomi also offers a long-tail of products developed by third parties, such as tech like smart speakers and non-tech items that include bags and pens, which it sells directly to its consumer base using its e-commerce sites and ‘Mi’ brand

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CipherTrace: the amount of cryptocurrencies stolen from exchanges tripled to $761M in the first half of 2018 compared to all of 2017, may reach $1.5B…

Penny Crosman / American Banker : CipherTrace: the amount of cryptocurrencies stolen from exchanges tripled to $761M in the first half of 2018 compared to all of 2017, may reach $1.5B this year   —  Three times more cryptocurrency was stolen from exchanges in the first half of 2018 than all of 2017, with a corresponding boost …

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Sonos files for an IPO, with plans to raise $100M, and reports a net loss of $14.2M on revenue of $992.5M in the year ending September 30, 2017 (Tomi…

Tomi Kilgore / MarketWatch : Sonos files for an IPO, with plans to raise $100M, and reports a net loss of $14.2M on revenue of $992.5M in the year ending September 30, 2017   —  Sonos Inc., the smart home sound system company, filed Friday to go public.  The company has applied to be listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the ticker symbol “SONO.”

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