Home / Tag Archives: article

Tag Archives: article

Comcast is leaking the names and passwords of customers’ wireless routers

Comcast has just been caught in a major security snafu: revealing the passwords of its customers’ Xfinity-provided wireless routers in plaintext on the web. Anyone with a subscriber’s account number and street address number will be served up the Wi-Fi name and password via the company’s Xfinity internet activation service. Security researchers Karan Saini and Ryan Stevenson reported the issue to ZDnet . The site is meant to help people setting up their internet for the first time: ideally, you put in your data, and Comcast sends back the router credentials while activating the service. The problem is threefold: You can “activate” an account that’s already active The data required to do so is minimal and it is not verified via text or email The wireless name and password are sent on the web in plaintext This means that anyone with your account number and street address number (e.g. the 1425 in “1425 Alder Ave,” no street name, city, or apartment number needed), both of which can be found on your paper bill or in an email, will instantly be given your router’s SSID and password, allowing them to log in and use it however they like or monitor its traffic. They could also rename the router’s network or change its password, locking out subscribers. This only affects people who use a router provided by Xfinity/Comcast , which comes with its own name and password built in. Though it also returns custom SSIDs and passwords, since they’re synced with your account and can be changed via app and other methods. What can you do?

Read More »

Comcast is leaking the names and passwords of customers’ wireless routers

Comcast has just been caught in a major security snafu: revealing the passwords of its customers’ Xfinity-provided wireless routers in plaintext on the web. Anyone with a subscriber’s account number and street address number will be served up the Wi-Fi name and password via the company’s Xfinity internet activation service. Security researchers Karan Saini and Ryan Stevenson reported the issue to ZDnet . The site is meant to help people setting up their internet for the first time: ideally, you put in your data, and Comcast sends back the router credentials while activating the service. The problem is threefold: You can “activate” an account that’s already active The data required to do so is minimal and it is not verified via text or email The wireless name and password are sent on the web in plaintext This means that anyone with your account number and street address number (e.g. the 1425 in “1425 Alder Ave,” no street name, city, or apartment number needed), both of which can be found on your paper bill or in an email, will instantly be given your router’s SSID and password, allowing them to log in and use it however they like or monitor its traffic. They could also rename the router’s network or change its password, locking out subscribers. This only affects people who use a router provided by Xfinity/Comcast , which comes with its own name and password built in. Though it also returns custom SSIDs and passwords, since they’re synced with your account and can be changed via app and other methods. What can you do? While this problem is at large, it’s no good changing your password — Comcast will just provide any malicious actor the new one.

Read More »

Google declines to provide the names of hair salon and restaurant used in controversial Google Duplex demo, or say whether the calls were edited (Dan…

Dan Primack / Axios : Google declines to provide the names of hair salon and restaurant used in controversial Google Duplex demo, or say whether the calls were edited   —  Google made headlines by demonstrating an AI-powered voice assistant that made haircut and restaurant reservations, without betraying that it isn't human.

Read More »

eBay launches Interests, personalized product recommendations that cut across shopping categories, using big data and a questionnaire (Yasmin…

Yasmin Gagne / Fast Company : eBay launches Interests, personalized product recommendations that cut across shopping categories, using big data and a questionnaire   —  eBay, says Bradford Shellhamer, the company's head of engagement, wants to be the “heavy metal-loving, yogi, OSU fan's favorite store.”  It also wants to be yours.

Read More »

Facebook faces fresh criticism over ad targeting of sensitive interests

Is Facebook trampling over laws that regulate the processing of sensitive categories of personal data by failing to ask people for their explicit consent before it makes sensitive inferences about their sex life, religion or political beliefs? Or is the company merely treading uncomfortably and unethically close to the line of the law? An investigation by the Guardian and the Danish Broadcasting Corporation has found that Facebook’s platform allows advertisers to target users based on interests related to political beliefs, sexuality and religion — all categories that are marked out as sensitive information under current European data protection law. And indeed under the incoming GDPR , which will apply across the bloc from May 25. The joint investigation found Facebook’s platform had made sensitive inferences about users — allowing advertisers to target people based on inferred interests including communism, social democrats, Hinduism and Christianity. All of which would be classed as sensitive personal data under EU rules. And while the platform offers some constraints on how advertisers can target people against sensitive interests — not allowing advertisers to exclude users based on a specific sensitive interest, for example (Facebook having previously run into trouble in the US for enabling discrimination via ethnic affinity-based targeting ) — such controls are beside the point if you take the view that Facebook is legally required to ask for a user’s explicit consent to processing this kind of sensitive data up front, before making any inferences about a person. Indeed, it’s very unlikely that any ad platform can put people into buckets with sensitive labels like ‘interested in social democrat issues’ or ‘likes communist pages’ or ‘attends gay events’ without asking them to let it do so first. And Facebook is not asking first. This is going to be a big battleground. We talk about inferred special category data in the context of the Article 29 Working Party guidelines on profiling here > https://t.co/TjCHqOvcBA (open access) https://t.co/XZB5ypjELs — Michael Veale (@mikarv) May 16, 2018 Facebook argues otherwise, of course — claiming that the information it gathers about people’s affinities/interests, even when they entail sensitive categories of information such as sexuality and religion, is not personal data.

Read More »

Society needs the Artificial Intelligence Data Protection Act now

On December 31, 2015, I published my original call to arms for society’s rational regulation of artificial intelligence before it is too late. I explained certain reasons why someone who is against solving problems through regulation would propose precisely that mechanism to help hedge the threats created by AI, and announced my proposed legislation: The Artificial Intelligence Data Protection Act (AIDPA). Since 2015, we have witnessed AI’s rapidly evolving national and international growth and adoption that will soon impact every phase of mankind’s life, from birth to death, sex to religion, politics to war, education to emotion, jobs to unemployment. Three of many recent developments confirm why now is the time for the AIDPA: (1) a McKinsey study from late 2017 determined that up to 800 million workers worldwide may lose their jobs to AI by 2030, half of contemporary work functions could be automated by 2055 and other recent studies suggest as many as 47 percent of U.S. jobs could be threatened by automation or AI over the next few decades; (2) AI has now created IP with little or no human involvement and continues to be programmed, tested and used to do so; see   my Twitter  for a library of media reports on AI-created IP; (3) tech giants and regulators are starting to acknowledge that industries that create and use AI should be at least partially responsible for minimizing the impact of AI-displaced workers. Now – and not later — society must address AI’s legal, economic and social implications with regard to IP and employment. Current legislation does not adequately account for the new challenges, threats and needs presented by the impact of AI. The question is not “if” but “when” society will regulate AI. Rather than leave the job solely to politicians, industry should lead the way through the AIDPA. The urgency to finalize and enact the AIDPA cannot be understated. This article addresses the AIDPA’s twin focuses (AI’s threats to intellectual property rights and the labor force) and presents a proposed framework to address them. The AIDPA is intended to provide industry with a voice in regulating AI while promoting its safe, secure and ethical use. The United States must lead the way in regulating AI, and leaders in industry, technology and ethics should join together to finalize and enact the AIDPA — the first and most important legislation of its kind. Intellectual property considerations The AIDPA’s focuses on ownership of IP and the security risks resulting from machine learning that exceeds its initial programming and/or that by virtue of its programming becomes capable of autonomous human-like reasoning. For a host of legal and technical reasons, current IP laws cannot adequately account for IP created by AI working independent of human involvement or oversight (music, art, medical techniques, processes to communicate, processes to kill, etc.) or that exceeds its initial programming

Read More »

Subscriptions for the 1%

We are in a subscription hell . Paywalls are going up across the internet, at aggregated prices few but Jeff Bezos can afford. The software I used to pay for once now requires an annual tax, because … “updates.” We are getting less every day, and paying more for it, all the while the core openness that made the world wide web such a dynamic and interesting place is rapidly disappearing. I’m not a subscription hater. Far from it: subscriptions are vital, because they provide sustainability to the content and software I care about. Regular, recurring income helps make the business of creation more predictable, ensuring that creators can do what they do best — create — rather than stress about whether the next book or app is going to generate their yearly earnings. Greed, though, has managed to make subscriptions deeply unpalatable. Sustainability has become usurious, with news subscriptions jumping in price and app developers suddenly demanding a fee where none existed before . This avarice for our wallets though is not misdirected. Ultimately, one group of people is to blame for this situation, and it isn’t the bean counters in the accounting department. It’s us.

Read More »

‘Black dot of death’ bug hits iPhones – here’s how to fix it – wtkr.com

wtkr.com 'Black dot of death' bug hits iPhones – here's how to fix it wtkr.com There's a new iPhone bug floating around out there, one that will completely freeze a user's Messages app — and not even a reboot can fix it. It's called by at least one tech website the “black dot of death,” Mashable reports. And it's similar to a ... The Black Dot of Death Crashes iPhones! Beware YouTube 'Black dot' bug is the latest Unicode text handling flaw to crash iPhone and iPads, works on iOS 11.3 and iOS 11.4 9to5Mac WhatsApp is working on a chat filter feature | WABetaInfo WABetaInfo PocketNow  - Macworld all 130 news articles »

Read More »

Meet the dominatrix living inside an Echo Dot

NSFW: This article contains links to and descriptions of explicit sexual acts including BDSM play that some may find uncomfortable. The individuals included in this report are consenting adults who observe proper safety procedures in their play. A...

Read More »

How hypnosis app Mindset used the power of social media to attract 12000 users in two months – SmartCompany.com.au

SmartCompany.com.au How hypnosis app Mindset used the power of social media to attract 12000 users in two months SmartCompany.com.au Australian hypnosis app Mindset has reached a milestone 12,000 users in just over two months, attributing its growth to a strong social presence and a commitment to getting to know its users. Founded by Chris Naoumidis and his brother Alex Naoumidis ...

Read More »