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Tag Archives: bbc

Whisk, the smart food platform that makes recipes shoppable, acquires competitor Avocando

Whisk , the U.K. startup that has built a B2B data platform to power various food apps, including making online recipes ‘shoppable’, has acquired Avocando, a competitor based in Germany. The exact financial terms of the deal remain undisclosed, although TechCrunch understands it was all-cash and that Whisk is acquiring the tech, customer base, integrations, and team. Related to this, Avocando’s founders are joining Whisk. “The team is joining Whisk to help scale a joint global vision to help leading businesses create integrated and meaningful digital food experiences using cutting-edge technology,” says Whisk in a statement. To that end, Whisk’s “smart food platform” enables app developers, publishers and online supermarkets/grocery stories to do a number of interesting things. The first relates to making recipes shoppable i.e. making it incredibly easy to order the ingredients needed to cook a recipe listed online or in an app. Specifically, Whisk’s platform parses ingredients in a recipe, and matches it to products at local grocery stores based on user preferences (e.g. “50g of butter, cubed” matched to “250g Tesco Salted Butter”). It then interfaces with the store to fill the users basket with the needed items. The second is recipe personalisation. Based on user preferences (e.g

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Netflix wins a BAFTA, but the BBC’s still king

Britain's Academy of Film and Television Arts held its annual celebration of the small screen, and Netflix was expected to win big. The streaming service was in line for six awards, with The Crown and Black Mirror both being nominated for three each....

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Univision plans Netflix-style streaming service

Univision's streaming ambitions are growing beyond live video. The Hispanic-American broadcaster has unveiled an on-demand service that gives you access to both its own shows as well as partners like the BBC and Viacom. Full access to live and on-d...

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The BBC will run its first podcast ads, powered by Acast

The BBC will start running ads in its podcasts, thanks to a partnership with podcast publishing and monetization company Acast . Acast CEO Ross Adams told me that ads will start running later this week, with the BBC including “bumpers” today announcing the imminent ad launch. “Podcasts are one way we’re reinventing BBC radio to engage younger audiences with our world class content,” said Bob Shennan, director of BBC Radio and Music, in the announcement. “We’re working with established and new talent to produce shows which are informative and entertaining as only the BBC can be. The BBC has been challenged to generate more commercial income to supplement the licence fee and this new deal will contribute to that.” To be clear, the BBC will remain ad-free in the United Kingdom, where it’s supported by the aforementioned license fee . Adams said one of the things Acast could offer was the ability to make sure ads were only served outside the U.K. (and to account for edge cases like U.K. military bases in other countries). Adams said Acast will also be providing the BBC with new data about how the podcasts are performing. “We give them the data and the dashboard to start really doubling down and focusing on podcasting as a medium,” he said. According the announcement, this will apply to all BBC podcasts outside the U.K. (subject to rights restrictions), including Global News, The Assassination, World Business Report and Radio 4’s In Our Time. Most podcasts will have a single 30-second ad at the beginning, then another at the end.

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Streaming sports service fuboTV raises $75 million from AMC and others

Days after Disney-owned ESPN launched its new streaming service, ESPN+ , a three-year old streaming TV service for sports fans, fuboTV , is announcing the close of $75 million in Series D funding. The round included new investor AMC Networks, and existing investors 21st Century Fox, Luminari Capital, Northzone, Sky, and the former Scripps Networks Interactive, which was recently acquired by Discovery, Inc. FuboTV has been working to carve out a niche for itself in the streaming TV market, where a number of competitors are delivering television programming to cord cutters by way of the internet. In terms of subscribers, that space today is led by Dish’s Sling TV and AT&T’s newer DirecTV Now. But the market has also seen a lot of newcomers over the past year or so, with launches from Hulu’s Live TV , YouTube TV , and Philo . PlayStation Vue is a competitor as well, while CBS runs its own over-the-top streaming TV service with just its content, CBS All Access. While many streaming TV services offer some sports content in their base packages, or sell additional access through add-ons, fuboTV’s core focus has been on serving the sports fan. The service provides access to live games from the NBA, NHL, UFC, and more soccer than other streaming providers – including matches from Bundesliga, EPL and La Liga to Liga MX, MLS, FIFA World Cup qualifiers, UEFA Champions League matches and more. That access doesn’t come cheap, however. FuboTV’s basic package with 70-plus channels, Fubo Premier, is $19.99 for the first month, which then becomes $44.99 per month after. Customers can then customize their package with other options, like a “Sports Plus,” “Adventure Plus,” or “International Sports Plus” upgrade; a DVR with 500 hours of storage instead of just 30; or the option to add a third stream. Even though the entry-level package is more than a full subscription to a mainstream service like Sling TV or YouTube TV, fuboTV managed to reach over 100,000 paid subscribers as of September 2017, and is continuing to see double-digit growth, it says. Since the last funding round ten months ago, the company has streamed its first MLB All Star Game, Playoffs and World Series; Tour de France; NFL regular season, playoffs and Super Bowl; college football; and the Winter Olympic Games.

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Australia latest to open probe into Facebook data scandal

Australia’s privacy watchdog has opened an investigation into Facebook in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica data misuse scandal. Yesterday Facebook revealed that more users than previously thought could have had their personal information passed to the company back in 2014 — saying as many as 87 million Facebook users  could have had their data “improperly shared”, thereby confirming the testimony of ex-Cambridge Analytica employee, Chris Wylie, who last month told a UK parliamentary committee he believed that  substantially more than 50M Facebook users had had their information swiped. And while most of these Facebook users are located in the US, multiple millions are not. The company confirmed the international split yesterday in a blog post  — including that 1 million+ of the total are UK users; more than 620k are Canadian; and more than 300k are Australian. Though in tiny grey lettering at the bottom of the graphic Facebook caveats that these figures are merely its “best estimates” of the maximum number of affected users. After the US, the largest proportion of Facebook users affected by the data leakage were in the Philippines and Indonesia. In a statement today the Australian watchdog (OAIC) said it has opened a formal investigation into Facebook. “The investigation will consider whether Facebook has breached the  Privacy Act 1988 (Privacy Act). Given the global nature of this matter, the OAIC will confer with regulatory authorities internationally,” it writes. “All organisations that are covered by the Privacy Act have obligations in relation to the personal information that they hold.

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More countries are probing Grab-Uber deal over anti-competition concerns

Singapore’s competition agency last week opened an investigation into Grab’s acquisition of Uber’s Southeast Asia , and now authorities in the Philippines and Malaysia are following suit by looking closely at the deal. From The Philippines Competition Commission : The Grab-Uber acquisition is likely to have a far reaching impact on the riding public and the transportation services. As such, the PCC is looking at the deal closely with the end view of potentially reviewing it for competition concerns, as a notified transaction, or by opening a  motu proprio  case. And Malaysia’s minister in charge of public transport licensing, speaking to Reuters : We won’t take it lightly. We will monitor this because it is still early days and we don’t know what will happen next. We have stressed that if there is any anti-competitive behavior, the Competition Act will come into force. We have spelt this out to them. Reuters reports that Indonesian authorities aren’t yet commenting on whether they will probe the tie-up. Announcing the deal last week, Grab said it planned to close the Uber app within two weeks — meaning by the end of this week at the time of writing — while Uber Eats will continue until the end of May before being folded into the Grab Food service. However, the Competition Commission of Singapore (CCS) requested that both companies maintain their products and pricing while it conducts an overview of how the transaction impacts the competitive landscape. The organization said it has “reasonable grounds” to suspect that the deal may fall foul of section 54 of Singapore’s Competition Act.

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Publishing blockchain startup, Po.et hires VP of engineering

Po.et a startup that wants to put publishing permissions on the blockchain and build a marketplace on top of it, announced today that it was bringing on Eric Elliott as the VP of engineering. Today’s announcement comes on the heels that the company had hired Jarrod Dicker as CEO  in February. Dicker was previously vice president of innovation and commercial strategy at  The   Washington Post. Elliott, who has written a book on Javascript , has a range of experience working for the likes of Adobe, Wall Street Journal and BBC. He also helped code BandPage, a startup that was sold to YouTube in 2016. He sees this company as a way to move publishing away from a traditional gatekeeper-driven system to one based on purely on value on the blockchain. “ Po.et represents the chance to liberate creatives from traditional gatekeepers: to more directly connect with revenue sources to enable them to earn money doing what they love to do. It also represents a chance to make it easier for companies to find the resources they’re looking for, and obtain legal license to use the content with the click of a button,” Elliott wrote in a blog post announcing his new position. Dicker says Elliott’s credentials speak for themselves. “Eric has scaled multiple engineering teams to tens of millions of users and helped build Adobe Creative Cloud, enabling the successful transition from boxed software to the SaaS model ,” he told TechCrunch. “The big thing about this announcement is that we’re growing our engineering core.

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Brits (still) can’t stream BBC iPlayer abroad

While the BBC charges £150 a year for a TV licence fee in the UK, the corporation won't offer streaming access to its iPlayer in mainland Europe. The paid-for competition, like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, now follow the EU's digital media p...

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BBC Claims Netflix & Amazon Are Squeezing Them Out – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo BBC Claims Netflix & Amazon Are Squeezing Them Out Ubergizmo Before video streaming platforms like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon became mainstream, it used to be a handful of channels that TV watchers could rely on, with BBC being one of them. However it appears that the company hasn't done enough to keep up with ... and more »

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