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Windows 10 File Explorer Gets Dark Mode – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Windows 10 File Explorer Gets Dark Mode Ubergizmo If you've ever wanted File Explorer on Windows 10 to get a dark mode rejoice because Microsoft will soon make your wish come true. It has finally added a dark mode to File Explorer on Windows 10. It has only been released as part of the latest Insider ... and more »

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Amazon just launched a mobile browser because its quest for world domination isn’t yet complete – Mashable

Mashable Amazon just launched a mobile browser because its quest for world domination isn't yet complete Mashable Amazon just launched a mobile browser because its quest for world domination isn't yet complete. Share on Facebook Share Tweet on Twitter Share Share. What's This? One service provider to rule them all. Image: VICKY LETA/ MASHABLE . 2017%2f09%2f18%2f2b ... and more »

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Google Chrome may now support Oculus Rift

An eagle-eyed Redditor may have just discovered that Oculus Rift is now supported in the latest stable version of Google Chrome. You'll have to do a little menu legwork to set it up by tracking down a setting in Chrome's flags, but the browser can su...

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Ad-blocking browser Brave signs up Dow Jones as a partner

It looks like at least one major news publisher is on-board with Brave , the ad-blocking web browser founded by former Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich . Brave Software and Dow Jones Media Group announced today  they will be partnering in a deal that will bring Dow Jones content (specifically, full access to Barrons.com or a premium MarketWatch newsletter) to “a limited number of users who download the Brave browser on a first-come, first-serve basis.” In addition, Barron’s and MarketWatch are becoming verified publishers on Brave’s Basic Attention Token (BAT) platform, a blockchain-based system that will allow consumers and eventually advertisers to pay publishers. ( Brave had a hugely successful initial coin offering last year.) And the companies said they will be working together to experiment with different ways to use blockchain technology in media and advertising. “As global digital publishers, we believe it is important to continually explore new and emerging technologies that can be used to build quality customer experiences,” said Barron’s Senior Vice President Daniel Bernard in the announcement. The language that the companies are using, as well as the absence of publisher’s flagship newspaper The Wall Street Journal from the deal, suggests that Dow Jones isn’t going all-in on this experiment yet. But it’s certainly a dramatic change in tone from the way most publishers talk about ad-blockers. In fact, a group of newspapers (including the Journal)  published a letter  two years stating that Brave’s business model was “indistinguishable from a plan to steal our content to publish on your own website.” Brave recently announced the launch of a referral program that rewards creators with BAT when they convince their fans to switch over to the browser. The company also said it has 2 million monthly active users.

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Microsoft Translator Updated With Offline AI Translations | Ubergizmo – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Microsoft Translator Updated With Offline AI Translations | Ubergizmo Ubergizmo Translation apps come in handy when traveling to a country where you don't speak the language. Sometimes, you even need to memorize some basic phrases just to ensure that you get connectivity in order to use a translator. Microsoft wants to make that ... Microsoft brings AI-powered translation to end users and developers, whether you're online or offline – Translator MSDN Blogs - Microsoft Amazon.com: Microsoft Translator: Appstore for Android Amazon.com Microsoft Translator on the App Store - iTunes - Apple iTunes - Apple all 29 news articles »

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Chrome now mutes auto-playing videos by default

Chrome will block autoplaying videos and ads with sound by default. Like VentureBeat notes, this was originally supposed to be added to Chrome 64 back in January, but it got delayed a few months. This should be enough to keep most sites quiet for you...

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Coinbase buys Earn.com and makes CEO Balaji Srinivasan its first CTO

Coinbase, the prominent cryptocurrency exchange, has announced its most significant piece of M&A to date after it agreed to buy Earn.com , the U.S. startup that uses the blockchain for its paid-email service, in a deal worth more than $120 million. In addition, Coinbase has appointed Earn.com co-founder and CEO Balaji Srinivasan as its first CTO, while the rest of the team will transition over, too. The deal doesn’t come as a complete surprise as  Coindesk reported  last month that Coinbase and Earn.com were in talks over a deal. This is Coinbase’s fifth acquisition to date — its most recent was a deal to buy Cipher Browser last week  — and its largest outlay so far. Neither party is saying exactly how much Coinbase is paying, but Srinivasan told TechCrunch in an interview that the deal represents a positive return on investment for those who backed Earn.com, which was formerly known as 21. The company had raised more than $120 million from investors, according to Crunchbase data , which gives some idea of the total deal package. All of Coinbase’s previous acquisitions have centered around talent; for example, last week’s Cipher deal saw highly rated developer Peter Kim join the Coinbase ranks. That seems to be a major motivator for landing Earn.com, despite a high price and a product that both Srinivasan and Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong intend to “double down” on post-acquisition. A Stanford graduate who holds a BS, MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering, Srinivasan is highly prized in Silicon Valley. He sits on the board at power investor firm Andreessen Horowitz and is known for being an early evangelist of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology. (He once told me that he tipped Uber drivers in bitcoin in its early days, going so far as to set up Coinbase wallets for them while in their back of their car as they took him to his destination.) It’s not a secret that Coinbase has struggled to fill its vacancies with talent, and that has extended to the CTO role. Bringing in a name as big as Srinivasan is a major coup for the company and, with the startup said to be paying some of its talent more than $1 million per year in salary, it doesn’t make you wonder how big a factor landing Srinivasan is in making this deal happen. More importantly for Andreessen Horowitz, Qualcomm Ventures,  Khosla Ventures and other backers of Earn.com, this deal with Coinbase — which includes cash, stock and crypto — represents a turnaround in fortunes for the startup.

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Coinbase acquires decentralized app browser/wallet Cipher Browser

Coinbase announced today that it has acquired Cipher Browser , a decentralized app browser and wallet for the Ethereum blockchain that it will be using to bolster its own similar product. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. We're excited to welcome @CipherBrowser to Coinbase! https://t.co/CIqK0EtDbb — Coinbase (@coinbase) April 13, 2018 Coinbase operates a decentralized mobile browser of its own, which it introduced last year, called Toshi . Users could utilize Toshi as a wallet for Ethereum and also browse Ethereum apps and send secure messages just like they can on Cipher Browser. Coinbase will be combining the Toshi and Cipher Browser teams. It won’t be too crazy of a restructuring, given that Cipher was actually just created by a single person. That single person,  Pete Kim , will become the head of engineering at Toshi as the company looks to integrate certain features from Kim’s product into the Toshi browser. Kim will work with Sid Coelho-Prabhu, Coinbase’s product lead for Toshi. One of the first of these new features coming to the browser will be Testnets, which allow developers to test and experiment with their apps without having to use real cryptocurrency.

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Firefox updates its iOS web browser to turn Tracking Protection on by default

At a time when web users are becoming more concerned about their online privacy and personal data, Mozilla today is launching a new version of its Firefox for iOS web browser that includes Tracking Protection turned on by default. That means when you use the browser, websites won’t be able to track your activity and capture your personal information, unless you explicitly allow a given site to have that ability. The feature was previously available in Firefox for iOS, but users would have to turn it on for themselves. Now, it’s on by default, Mozilla says, whether the browser is used in Regular mode or set to Private Browsing mode. The latter is the even more private mode which includes both automatic ad and content blocking, and doesn’t keep a history of visited sites. Firefox’s Tracking Protection is based on the same technology that blocks ads, analytics and social media tracking that’s also used by th  Firefox Focus  content blocker on Android and iOS, as well as in Firefox for Desktop and Firefox for Android. And its rules about trackers are based on the  Disconnect blocklist,  which has a specific definition of tracking that’s aimed at protecting individual users’ data from being collection across multiple websites and then retained. Mozilla says it made the decision to make Tracking Protection the default in response to users’ increased concerns over data privacy. “At Mozilla we’ve always believed it’s important to respect people’s’ privacy and give them the control to decide which information they want to share, and what information they don’t. Now more than ever consumers are demanding this from the companies with whom they share their data,” says Mozilla, in its announcement about the launch. Of course, turning on Tracking Protection has another benefit, too. When websites aren’t bogged down with tracking scripts, they tend to load faster. And with better-performing, faster-loading websites, users will also save on mobile data and not drain their battery as quickly. The change to Tracking Protection is the most notable feature arriving in the latest version of Firefox for iOS, but it’s not the only one. The browser will now also allow iPad users to re-order their tabs, introduces more keyboard shortcuts , and supports drag-and-drop of links between Firefox and other apps

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Google is about to launch a Gmail web redesign

Google sent an email to G Suite customers to tell them that the company has been working on a brand new version of Gmail for the web. In addition to a fresh design, the company also listed some of the new features. You can expect to be able to access Google Calendar from the Gmail interface directly. Outlook customers are probably going to love this. You’ll be able to snooze emails so that they reappear in your inbox hours or days later. This is a good way to clean your inbox if you can’t reply to a specific email just yet. If you use Gmail on your iPhone or Android phone, you may already be using smart replies . These algorithmically-generated replies will also be available on Gmail.com. Finally, Google is working on a new way to store your emails on your computer for offline access. As the company is slowly phasing out Chrome Apps, Google will now be using standard web technologies to let your browser store your data. Google has yet to share screenshots of the new design. Gmail’s web interface hasn’t changed in years — you can probably expect a new interface that follows Google’s Material design language . Update: Sahil Bhutani contacted me after reading this article because he saw a Google employee playing with the new design on public transport.

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How to keep your ISP’s nose out of your browser history with encrypted DNS

Encrypting DNS traffic between your device and a "privacy-focused" provider can keep someone from spying on where your browser is pointed or using DNS attacks to send you somewhere else. (credit: Westend61 / Getty Images ) The death of network neutrality and the loosening of regulations on how Internet providers handle customers' network traffic have raised many concerns over privacy. Internet providers (and others watching traffic as it passes over the Internet) have long had a tool that allows them to monitor individuals' Internet habits with ease: their Domain Name System (DNS) servers. And if they haven't been cashing in on that data already (or using it to change how you see the Internet), they likely soon will. DNS services are the phone books of the Internet, providing the actual Internet Protocol (IP) network address associated with websites' and other Internet services' host and domain names. They turn arstechnica.com into 50.31.169.131, for example. Your Internet provider offers up DNS as part of your service, but your provider could also log your DNS traffic—in essence, recording your entire browsing history. "Open" DNS services provide a way of bypassing ISPs' services for reasons of privacy and security—and in some places, evading content filtering, surveillance, and censorship. And on April 1 (not a joke), Cloudflare launched its own new, free high-performance authoritative DNS service designed to enhance users' privacy on the Internet. This new offering also promised a way to hide DNS traffic completely from view—encryption. Read 56 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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YouTube TV Can Now Be Streamed On Firefox – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo YouTube TV Can Now Be Streamed On Firefox Ubergizmo Given how Google and YouTube are under the same umbrella, it makes sense that YouTube's services and features are designed and probably optimized for Google products like its Chrome browser. This is why it wasn't surprising that YouTube TV supported ... and more »

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