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Tag Archives: emoji

Twitter replaces its gun emoji with a water gun

Twitter has now followed Apple’s lead in changing its pistol emoji to a harmless, bright green water gun. And in doing so, the company that has struggled to handle the abuse, hate speech and harassment taking place across its platform, has removed one of the means for online abusers to troll their victims. The change is one of several rolling out now in Twitter’s emoji update, Twemoji 2.6 , which impacts Twitter users on the web, mobile web, and on Tweetdeck. Below: Apple’s water gun Below: Twitter’s water gun The decision to replace an emoji of a weapon to a child’s toy was seen as a political statement  when Apple in 2016 rolled out its own water gun emoji  in iOS 10.  The company had also argued against the addition of a rifle emoji, ultimately leading to the Unicode’s decision to remove the gun from its list of new emoji candidates that same year. With these moves, Apple was effectively telling people that a gun didn’t have a place in the pictorial language people commonly use when messaging on mobile devices. These sorts of changes matter because of emoji’s ability to influence culture and its function as a globally understood form of communication. That’s why so much attention is given to those emoji updates that go beyond the cosmetic – like updates that offer better representations of human skin tones, show different types of family groupings or relationships, or those give various professions – like a police officer or a scientist – both male and female versions, for example. In the case of the water pistol, Apple set a certain standard that others in the industry have since followed. Samsung also later replaced its gun with a water gun , as did WhatsApp . Google, meanwhile, didn’t follow Apple’s lead saying that  it believed in cross-platform communication

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Twitter replaces its gun emoji with a water gun

Twitter has now followed Apple’s lead in changing its pistol emoji to a harmless, bright green water gun. And in doing so, the company that has struggled to handle the abuse, hate speech and harassment taking place across its platform, has removed one of the means for online abusers to troll their victims. The change is one of several rolling out now in Twitter’s emoji update, Twemoji 2.6 , which impacts Twitter users on the web, mobile web, and on Tweetdeck. Below: Apple’s water gun Below: Twitter’s water gun The decision to replace an emoji of a weapon to a child’s toy was seen as a political statement  when Apple in 2016 rolled out its own water gun emoji  in iOS 10.  The company had also argued against the addition of a rifle emoji, ultimately leading to the Unicode’s decision to remove the gun from its list of new emoji candidates that same year. With these moves, Apple was effectively telling people that a gun didn’t have a place in the pictorial language people commonly use when messaging on mobile devices. These sorts of changes matter because of emoji’s ability to influence culture and its function as a globally understood form of communication. That’s why so much attention is given to those emoji updates that go beyond the cosmetic – like updates that offer better representations of human skin tones, show different types of family groupings or relationships, or those give various professions – like a police officer or a scientist – both male and female versions, for example. In the case of the water pistol, Apple set a certain standard that others in the industry have since followed. Samsung also later replaced its gun with a water gun , as did WhatsApp . Google, meanwhile, didn’t follow Apple’s lead saying that  it believed in cross-platform communication . Many others left their realistic gun emojis alone, too, including Microsoft. “The main problem with the different appearances of the pistol emoji has been the potential for confusion when one platform displays this as an innocuous toy, and another shows the same emoji as a weapon.

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Apple proposes new emojis to represent people with disabilities

Apple has proposed a number of emojis to the Unicode Consortium, the emoji gatekeeper of sorts, to better represent people with disabilities and depict accessibility-related tools like hearing aids, guide dogs and prosthetic limbs. That’s because Apple is unable to include these emojis in iOS and Mac OS until the Consortium adopts them. The proposed emojis depict people who experience blindness or low-vision, those who experience deafness or have trouble hearing, those with physical disabilities, as well as those with hidden disabilities like Autism, anxiety and PTSD. Here are the proposed emojis: gallery ids="1611289,1611290,1611291,1611292,1611293,1611294,1611295,1611296,1611297,1611298,1611299,1611300,1611301" “At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs,” the company wrote in a proposal to the Unicode Consortium. “Adding emoji emblematic to users’ life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability. Emoji are a universal language and a powerful tool for communication, as well as a form of self-expression, and can be used not only to represent one’s own personal experience, but also to show support for a loved one.” In order to develop these proposed emojis, Apple worked with the American Council of the Blind, Cerebral Palsy Foundation and National Association for the Deaf. What Apple put forward is not a comprehensive list of all the possible depictions of people with disabilities, the company noted in its proposal, but it could serve as a starting point. The next step is for the Unicode Technical Committee to meet up and vote on whether to approve these new emojis. That meeting happens next month. If approved, those characters would get shortlisted for Emoji 12.0, which is scheduled for a March 2019 release. If you want to hear more about what goes into emoji approval, be sure to check out this interview with Jeremy Burge, vice-chair of the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee

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Emoji authorities get rid of the sad poop face

It's been a while since the Unicode Emoji Consortium released its sixth set of proposed emojis last June, with a follow up in August (which offered up a drunken face and unhappy poo, oddly enough). Now the consortium has given developers the first Em...

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