Home / Tag Archives: health

Tag Archives: health

Announcing the latest additions to the agenda for Disrupt SF (Sept. 5-7)

TechCrunch Disrupt SF (September 5-7) , we said from the start, was going to be the most ambitious ever, and when it comes to programming, there’s no question the Disrupt SF agenda eclipses anything we’ve done in the past. There are two BIG stages, plus two speaker Q&A stages, workshops and a Startup Showcase stage, where the top exhibiting startups will tell their stories. We published the agenda back in early July, but we’ve also added dozens of sessions since then for a total of 77 on the Disrupt stages. You can always check out the complete and up-to-date agenda.  Here is a sampling of what you might have missed since we originally posted the agenda. On the Disrupt stages: Alex Stamos , former head of security at Facebook and Yahoo, on security in an insecure world Aileen Lee (Cowboy Ventures), Megan Quinn (Spark Capital) and Sarah Tavel (Benchmark) on the state of venture Dario Gill (IBM) and Chad Rigetti (Rigetti Computing) on quantum computing Laurie Yoler (Zoox), Reilly Brennan (Trucks VC) and  Chris Urmson (Aurora) on all things autonomous Jason Robbins (DraftKings) on the changing worlds of online fantasy and gambling Hans Tung (GGV) and Ti Wang (Liulishuo) on the Chinese startup road to U.S. markets Rachel Haurwitz (Caribou Biosciences) and  Trevor Martin (Mammoth Biosciences) on CRIPSR Rich Mahoney (Seismic) on wearable (and fashionable) robotics Rob Coneybeer (Shasta Ventures), Tess Hatch (Bessemer) and  Matt Ocko (Data Collective) on investing in space Robin Berzin (Parsley Health) and  Aaron Patzer (Vital Software) on the future of health Colin Angle (iRobot) on the next generation of home robotics Brian Brackeen (Kairos), Patrick Ball and Kristian Lum (HRDAG) on data and human rights In the 30 audience-driven Q&A sessions with speakers, including.. Building on DLT: Mance Harmon (Hedera) and Brian Behlendorf (Hyperledger) From Funding to Fintech: Nikolay Storonsky (Revolut) Inside the Blockchain:  Joe Lubin, Amanda Gutterman and Sam Cassatt (ConsenSys) Building Brands: Emily Heyward (Red Antler), Philip Krim (Casper) and Tina Sharkey (Brandless) Gaming’s Culture: Jason Citron (Discord) and Delane Parnell (PlayVS) Healthtech on the Horizon : Robin Berzin (Parsley Health) and Aaron Patzer (Vital Software) In the workshops : All Raise ‘s Women Founders Roundtable and AMA Verizon 5G: The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Sponsored by Verizon) Bringing NASA Technology Down to Earth (Sponsored by NASA) Hacking Human Performance (Sponsored by Red Bull ) Running a Node on a Distributed Ledger: Live Demo (Sponsored by Constellations Labs ) This is just a fraction of what you’ll be able to experience at Disrupt SF . There’s still time for you to grab your pass and save up top $500 — get yours here  today.

Read More »

One Medical may be in talks to raise more than $200 million

One Medical, the company hoping to disrupt the doctor’s office with concierge services, virtual visits and same-day appointments, is rumored to be in late-stage talks with the Carlyle Group for $200 million in funding, according to CNBC . The firm is also looking to buy an additional $100 million worth of shares from existing investors, according to the report. We’ve reached out to the Carlyle Group and One Medical for more information. One Medical has so far raised over $180 million, including from Alphabet’s venture arm GV and Benchmark Capital, to bring its idea of accessible healthcare to areas covering San Francisco, NYC, Seattle and several other cities across the country. The latest calculation put the company at just over $1 billion in valuation. This new cash infusion would more than double its coffers, bringing the total raised to more than $380 million.

Read More »

NYU and Facebook team up to supercharge MRI scans with AI

Magnetic resonance imaging is an invaluable tool in the medical field, but it’s also a slow and cumbersome process. It may take fifteen minutes or an hour to complete a scan, during which time the patient, perhaps a child or someone in serious pain, must sit perfectly still. NYU has been working on a way to accelerate this process, and is now collaborating with Facebook with the goal of cutting down MRI durations by 90 percent by applying AI-based imaging tools. It’s important at the outset to distinguish this effort from other common uses of AI in the medical imaging field. An X-ray, or indeed an MRI scan, once completed, could be inspected by an object recognition system watching for abnormalities, saving time for doctors and maybe even catching something they might have missed. This project isn’t about analyzing imagery that’s already been created, but rather expediting its creation in the first place. The reason MRIs take so long is because the machine must create a series of 2D images or slices, many of which must be stacked up to make a 3D image. Sometimes only a handful are needed, but for full fidelity and depth — for something like a scan for a brain tumor — lots of slices are required. The FastMRI project, begun in 2015 by NYU researchers, investigates the possibility of creating imagery of a similar quality to a traditional scan, but by collecting only a fraction of the data normally needed. Think of it like scanning an ordinary photo. You could scan the whole thing… but if you only scanned every other line (this is called “undersampling”) and then intelligently filled in the missing pixels, it would take half as long. And machine learning systems are getting quite good at tasks like that

Read More »

NYU and Facebook team up to supercharge MRI scans with AI

Magnetic resonance imaging is an invaluable tool in the medical field, but it’s also a slow and cumbersome process. It may take fifteen minutes or an hour to complete a scan, during which time the patient, perhaps a child or someone in serious pain, must sit perfectly still. NYU has been working on a way to accelerate this process, and is now collaborating with Facebook with the goal of cutting down MRI durations by 90 percent by applying AI-based imaging tools. It’s important at the outset to distinguish this effort from other common uses of AI in the medical imaging field. An X-ray, or indeed an MRI scan, once completed, could be inspected by an object recognition system watching for abnormalities, saving time for doctors and maybe even catching something they might have missed. This project isn’t about analyzing imagery that’s already been created, but rather expediting its creation in the first place. The reason MRIs take so long is because the machine must create a series of 2D images or slices, many of which must be stacked up to make a 3D image. Sometimes only a handful are needed, but for full fidelity and depth — for something like a scan for a brain tumor — lots of slices are required. The FastMRI project, begun in 2015 by NYU researchers, investigates the possibility of creating imagery of a similar quality to a traditional scan, but by collecting only a fraction of the data normally needed. Think of it like scanning an ordinary photo. You could scan the whole thing… but if you only scanned every other line (this is called “undersampling”) and then intelligently filled in the missing pixels, it would take half as long. And machine learning systems are getting quite good at tasks like that. Our own brains do it all the time: you have blind spots with stuff in them right now that you don’t notice because your vision system is filling in the gaps — intelligently. The data collected at left could be “undersampled” as at right, with the missing data filled in later If an AI system could be trained to fill in the gaps from MRI scans where only the most critical data is collected, the actual time during which a patient would have to sit in the imaging tube could be reduced considerably. It’s easier on the patient, and one machine could handle far more people than it does doing a full scan every time, making scans cheaper and more easily obtainable.

Read More »

Sailthru Named to Gartner’s 2018 Magic Quadrant for Mobile Marketing Platforms – PR Newswire (press release)

Sailthru Named to Gartner's 2018 Magic Quadrant for Mobile Marketing Platforms PR Newswire (press release) 20, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Sailthru, the leading personalized marketing automation technology provider for retail and publishing, today announces it has been named to Gartner's inaugural July 2018 Magic Quadrant for Mobile Marketing Platforms as a Niche ... and more »

Read More »

Google Firebase adds in-app messaging, JIRA integration, new reports and more

Firebase is now Google’s default platform for app developers, and over the course of the last four years since it was acquired, the service has greatly expanded its feature set and integrations with Google services. Today, it’s rolling out yet another batch of updates that bring new features, deeper integrations and a few design updates to the service. The highlight of this release is the launch of in-app messaging, which will allow developers to send targeted and contextual messages to users as they use the app. Developers can customize the look and feel of these in-app notifications, which are rolling out today, but what’s maybe even more important is that this feature is integrated with Firebase Predictions and Google Analytics for Firebase so that developers can just react to current behavior but also Firebase’s predictions of how likely a user is to spend some additional money or stop using the app. Developers who use Atlassian’s JIRA will also be happy to hear that Firebase is launching an integration with this tool. Firebase users can now create JIRA issues based on crash reports in Firebase. This integration will roll out in the next few weeks. Another new integration is a deeper connection to Crashlytics , which Google acquired from Twitter in 2017 (together with Fabric). Firebase will now let you export this data to BigQuery to analyze it — and then visualize it in Google’s Data Studio. And once it’s in BigQuery, it’s your data, so you’re not dependent on Firebase’s retention and deletion defaults. Talking about reports, Firebase Cloud Messaging is getting a new reporting dashboard and the Firebase Console’s Project Overview page has received a full design overhaul that’ll allow you to see the health and status of your apps on a single page. The Latest Release section now also features live data. These features will start rolling out today and should become available to everybody in the next few weeks.

Read More »

Motorola phone ‘brazen copy’ of iPhone X – BBC News

BBC News Motorola phone 'brazen copy' of iPhone X BBC News However, reviewers said the new Motorola P30 was a "brazen" and "egregious" rip-off of Apple's flagship device. Lenovo, which owns the Motorola brand, has not yet responded to the criticism. Motorola was a pioneer in the mobile phone industry, but its ... Motorola copied iPhone X for its new P30? So have other Android phones Hindustan Times all 163 news articles »

Read More »

Your Call Recording App Isn’t Going to Work With Android Pie – Gizmodo UK

Gizmodo UK Your Call Recording App Isn't Going to Work With Android Pie Gizmodo UK ... the change is an intentional blanket ban on recording calls, or whether Google may reintroduce the feature at a later date. There's been no word from the company itself, so we'll just have to see what happens in the near future. [Piunika Web via ... Exclusive: Google is developing a wearable health and fitness assistant called 'Google Coach' - Android Police Android Police Android Developers Blog: Updating Wear OS Google Play Store policy to increase app quality Android Developers Blog all 250 news articles »

Read More »

VR optics could help old folks keep the world in focus

The complex optics involved with putting a screen an inch away from the eye in VR headsets could make for smartglasses that correct for vision problems. These prototype “autofocals” from Stanford researchers use depth sensing and gaze tracking to bring the world into focus when someone lacks the ability to do it on their own. I talked with lead researcher Nitish Padmanaban at SIGGRAPH in Vancouver, where he and the others on his team were showing off the latest version of the system. It’s meant, he explained, to be a better solution to the problem of presbyopia, which is basically when your eyes refuse to focus on close-up objects. It happens to millions of people as they age, even people with otherwise excellent vision. There are, of course, bifocals and progressive lenses that bend light in such a way as to bring such objects into focus — purely optical solutions, and cheap as well, but inflexible, and they only provide a small “viewport” through which to view the world. And there are adjustable-lens glasses as well, but must be adjusted slowly and manually with a dial on the side. What if you could make the whole lens change shape automatically, depending on the user’s need, in real time? That’s what Padmanaban and colleagues Robert Konrad and Gordon Wetzstein are working on , and although the current prototype is obviously far too bulky and limited for actual deployment, the concept seems totally sound. Padmanaban previously worked in VR, and mentioned what’s called the convergence-accommodation problem. Basically, the way that we see changes in real life when we move and refocus our eyes from far to near doesn’t happen properly (if at all) in VR, and that can produce pain and nausea. Having lenses that automatically adjust based on where you’re looking would be useful there — and indeed some VR developers were showing off just that only 10 feet away. But it could also apply to people who are unable to focus on nearby objects in the real world, Padmanaban thought. This is an old prototype, but you get the idea. It works like this

Read More »

Femtech hardware startup Elvie inks strategic partnership with UK’s NHS

Elvie , a femtech hardware startup whose first product is a sleek  smart pelvic floor exerciser , has inked a strategic partnership with the UK’s National Health Service that will make the device available nationwide through the country’s free-at-the-point-of-use healthcare service so at no direct cost to the patient. It’s a major win for the startup that was co-founded in 2013 by CEO  Tania Boler and Jawbone founder, Alexander Asseily, with the aim of building smart technology that focuses on women’s issues — an overlooked and underserved category in the gadget space. Boler’s background before starting Elvie (née Chiaro) including working for the U.N. on global sex education curriculums. But her interest in pelvic floor health, and the inspiration for starting Elvie, began after she had a baby herself and found there was more support for women in France than the U.K. when it came to taking care of their bodies after giving birth. With the NHS partnership, which is the startup’s first national reimbursement partnership (and therefore, as a spokeswoman puts it, has “the potential to be transformative” for the still young company), Elvie is emphasizing the opportunity for its connected tech to help reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence, including those suffered by new mums or in cases of stress-related urinary incontinence. The Elvie kegel trainer is designed to make pelvic floor exercising fun and easy for women, with real-time feedback delivered via an app that also gamifies the activity, guiding users through exercises intended to strengthen their pelvic floor and thus help reduce urinary incontinence symptoms. The device can also alert users when they are contracting incorrectly. Elvie cites research suggesting the NHS spends £233M annually on incontinence, claiming also that around a third of women and up to 70% of expectant and new mums currently suffer from urinary incontinence. In 70 per cent of stress urinary incontinence cases it suggests symptoms can be reduced or eliminated via pelvic floor muscle training.

Read More »

The healthcare industry is in a world of cybersecurity hurt

Bob Ackerman Jr. Contributor Robert Ackerman Jr. is the founder and a managing director of Allegis Capital , an early-stage cybersecurity venture firm, and a founder of DataTribe , a startup “studio” for fledgling cyber startups staffed by former government technology innovators and cybersecurity professionals. More posts by this contributor Can data science save social media? The Trump team has failed to address the nation’s mounting cybersecurity threats As a relentless swarm of successful cyber attacks severely disrupt companies in every industry and require enormous expenditures to repair the damage, what typically gets lost in the shuffle is that some industries are victimized more than others — sometimes far more. The corporate victim that almost always grabs this dubious spotlight is the healthcare industry — the second-largest industry in the U.S. and one in which hacker meddling of operations not only costs lots of time, money and operational downtime, but threatens lives. The healthcare industry itself is partly responsible. In a seemingly admirable quest to maximize the quality of patient care, tunnel vision gives short shrift to other priorities, specifically cybersecurity. In aggregate, healthcare organizations on average spend only half as much on cybersecurity as other industries. For this and other reasons, such as the unusually high value of stolen patient records on the black market, attracting extra-large flocks of hackers, hospitals especially find themselves in a never-ending cyber war zone. FortiGuard Labs, a major security protection firm, reports that in 2017, healthcare saw an average of almost 32,000 intrusion attacks per day per organization as compared to more than 14,300 per organization in other industries. Some attacks are outright deadly. For example, MedStar Health , a huge, Maryland-based healthcare system, was severely incapacitated by a ransomware attack that made national headlines when, among other things, it threatened lives.

Read More »

Trustwave releases Social Mapper, an open source tool using facial recognition to find people’s social profiles at scale, says it will help ethical…

Melanie Ehrenkranz / Gizmodo : Trustwave releases Social Mapper, an open source tool using facial recognition to find people's social profiles at scale, says it will help ethical hackers   —  Security researchers released a tool this week that lets you collect social media profiles of a massive amount of people using face recognition.

Read More »