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Tag Archives: programming

AT&T’s New Live TV Streaming Service Will Cost $15 – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo AT&T's New Live TV Streaming Service Will Cost $15 Ubergizmo Many companies have launched their own online TV streaming services over the past couple of years and AT&T is one of them. It launched DirecTV Now back in 2016 but if it feels a bit too expensive for your taste, you will be interested in knowing that ... and more »

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Grasshopper, a learn-to-code app from Google’s Area 120 incubator, goes live

Google’s internal incubator, Area 120, is today releasing its next creation: a learn-to-code mobile app for beginners called Grasshopper . At launch, the app teaches would-be coders how to write JavaScript, via short lessons on their iPhone or Android device. The goal is to get coders proficient in the basics and core concepts, so they can take the next steps in their coding education – whether that’s taking online classes, attending a bootcamp, or playing around in Grasshopper’s own online playground where they can create interactive animations. Like other Area 120 projects, Grasshopper was built by a small team of Googlers , who had a personal interest in working on the project. “Coding is becoming such an essential skill, and we want to make it possible for everyone to learn even when life gets busy,” the app’s About Us page explains. “We made Grasshopper to help folks like you get into coding in a fun and easy way.” Area 120 has now been around for just over two years, but Google’s hadn’t heavily publicized its efforts until last year, when it launched a dedicated website for the incubator. To date, Area 120 has released things like Advr, an advertising format for VR ; personal stylist  Tailor ; emoji messenger  Supersonic ; a job-matching service in Bangladesh, a booking tool called Appointments ; and the YouTube co-watching app UpTime . The incubator’s goal – beyond potentially finding Google’s next breakthrough product – is to retain talented engineers who may have otherwise left the company to work on their own passion projects or startups. Grasshopper – whose name is a tribute to early programming pioneer Grace Hopper – was already known to be one of the projects in the works at Area 120. However, it hadn’t launched to the public until today. The app itself offers a series of courses, beginning with “The Fundamentals,” where users learn how code works, along with various terminology like functions, variables, strings, for loops, arrays, conditionals, operators, and objects

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Popular YouTube Music Videos Defaced In Hack – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Popular YouTube Music Videos Defaced In Hack Ubergizmo Some of the most popular music videos on YouTube appear to have fallen victim to a hack today. Vevo's YouTube account was likely hacked which resulted in music videos such as Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee's “Despacito,” which also happens to be the most ... and more »

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Why 2018 will be the year apps go to the edge

If you’re running a software company today, it’s almost a foregone conclusion that most or all of your apps will run in the cloud. Likely Amazon or Google’s. It’s hard to imagine that this wasn’t always the case, but there are still some late adopters migrating their own physical data centers into managed ones. And, as with all trends in technology, this too shall pass. Just when you were getting comfortable with containers and auto-scaling, a new architecture emerges, swinging the pendulum back to a truly distributed world. What’s wrong with the cloud? A typical self-driving car generates up to 100MB of data per second from a combination of cameras, LIDARs, accelerometers and on-board computers. That data needs to be processed nearly instantly to keep the car on the road. With so much data to sift through, the current generation of cellular networks can’t keep up. By the time data arrives in the cloud, it will be too late. Instead, data needs to be processed as close to the sensors as possible, directly at the edge of networks, on the cars themselves. Most of us aren’t building or riding in self-driving cars (yet), but there’s a good chance we’re already interacting with edge computing every day. Neural networks in smart speakers in almost  40 million American homes are listening for words like “Alexa,” “Siri” or “Google” and, according to Statista, 3 billion Snapchats are scanned for faces each day in order to add the addicting face filters.

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23andMe’s Anne Wojcicki and Unity’s John Riccitello to join us at Disrupt SF 2018

Disrupt SF might feel familiar to many of you, but I encourage you to be prepared for a surprise. The world’s most impactful tech startup conference is about to get bigger and better than ever. We’re moving to Moscone West , doubling attendance capacity, and tripling our programming with a total of four stages across three days. Which means we need the greatest minds in the biz to grace our stage. That said, I’m pleased to announce that 23andMe’s Anne Wojcicki and Unity’s John Riccitello will be joining us on stage! Anne Wojcicki After a decade investing in healthcare, Anne Wojcicki co-founded 23andMe in 2006. The company launched with a primary focus of giving consumers access to their own genetic information, disrupting an industry that Ancestry.com (founded in 1983) had been dominating. But it wasn’t always smooth sailing for the company. In 2013, the FDA started to intervene with 23andMe after growing concerned that the company might be giving consumers possibly inaccurate information about their genetic health risk. This led to the FDA halting the marketing and sale of 23andMe’s personal genome service. Regulatory approval, especially from the FDA, is a nightmare for many startups just getting their footing. But Wojcicki made the best of a tough situation and pivoted the company towards drug research and development , while simultaneously working on FDA approval. Later that year, the company got the green-light to offer 10 carrier tests, including one for Parkinson’s and one for late-onset Alzheimer’s. Since then, the company has partnered with Pfizer to help with drug research using 23andMe’s genetic data, introduced a therapeutics division, and hired top talent including Genentech’s Richard Sheller. In 2017, 23andMe raised $250 million led by Sequoia, bringing total funding to $491 million to date. At the time, Wojcicki said that they had only begun to scratch the surface of direct-to-consumer genetics.

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Nokia 8110’s slider ‘Matrix’ feature phone returns with 4G and a €79 price tag

 Nokia’s 8110 — the distinctive ‘candy bar’ feature phone with a slider opening — was once the phone that everyone wanted but no one could afford, made popular through the Matrix film franchise. Now HMD, the company that has the license to make Nokia phones, is hoping for a hit by bringing it back. Today, at MWC in Barcelona, Nokia officially took the wraps off the… Read More

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The three key CTO skills

 I’ve been CTO of HappyFunCorp since last year, and it has been a deeply edifying experience. Everything people told me was mostly true: I write less code; I go to more meetings, and turn up in more conference calls; I think more strategically, and less tactically; my time is spent in a more fragmented and kaleidoscopic manner. Oh, yeah — and I’m a lot more involved in bizdev… Read More

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Huawei launches its new MediaPad M5 tablets

 Tablets may not be the most exciting product category these days, but they also aren’t quite as dead as some pundits would like you to believe — and for Huawei, they are actually a growing business. Indeed, the company argues that it’s now the third largest tablet maker in the world. It’s no surprise then that the company today unveiled two (or three, depending on how… Read More

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Watch Samsung’s MWC conference live right here

 Samsung’s press conference at MWC in Barcelona is happening today. The conference starts at 6 PM CET (5 PM GMT, 12 PM EST, 9 AM PST). You can also check out our liveblog to get our commentary on Samsung’s news. And of course, everybody is waiting for the Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9+. Details about the company’s new flagship devices already leaked, but we don’t know much… Read More

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LG turns to EyeEm to add AI to its cameras

 LG today announced an updated version of the V30 smartphone and it comes with a supercharged camera powered by a third-party AI system. LG turned to EyeEm to add new features to the camera. Now, thanks to the EyeEm platform, the LG V30S ThinQ and soon the original V30 can automatically detect the subject of the picture — being a hamburger or dachshund — the camera will adjust… Read More

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The Rite Press takes low-tech coffee making to high-tech highs

 If coffee be the food of innovation, pour on. Give me excess of it that, surfeiting, the appetite may sicken, and so die. And if you wish to pour me coffee, do so from the Rite Press, a clever hack on the traditional French press that adds a few features that even high-end models don’t have. The press – which costs $35 for a half-liter model and $40 for the liter model – has… Read More

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