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Tag Archives: programming

Tech-support scammers revive bug that sends Chrome users into a panic

Enlarge (credit: Malwarebytes ) Con artists pushing tech-support scams are once again exploiting a Chrome bug that can give users the false impression they’re experiencing a serious operating-system error that requires the urgent help of a paid professional, according to a Google developer forum. A Mozilla developer forum indicates a similar bug may also be present in Firefox. The scam technique, which came to light in February , works by abusing the programming interface known as the window.navigator.msSaveOrOpenBlob . By combining the API with other functions, the scammers force the browser to save a file to disk, over and over, at intervals so fast it's impossible for normal users to see what's happening. Within five to 10 seconds, the browser becomes completely unresponsive. Users are left viewing pages that look like the one above or on the left side of the image, below, both of which were provided in February by antivirus provider Malwarebytes: The technique effectively freezes a browser immediately after it displays a fake error message reporting some sort of security breach or serious technical mishap. Given the appearance of a serious crash that can't be fixed simply by exiting the site, end users are more likely to be worked into a panic and call a phone number included in the warning. Once called, the scammers—posing as representatives from Microsoft or another legitimate company—then coax the caller into providing a credit card number in return for tech support to fix the non-existent security problem. The scams are often transmitted through malicious advertisements or legitimate sites that have been hacked. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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News 2 App of the Day – WKRN News 2

WKRN News 2 News 2 App of the Day WKRN News 2 News 2 is partnering with two organizations to make it easier for kids to get books this summer. Read More ». prev. next. Latest News - Local. Nashville prepares for biggest 4th of July celebration yet · Chattanooga woman killed after boat explosion in ...

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Catch these biotech investors speaking at Disrupt SF (Sept. 5-7)

TechCrunch’s Disrupt SF (Sept. 5-7) will be one for the record books, with twice the attendees and twice the programming sessions compared to past Disrupts, which means we can tackle emerging, super exciting categories like biotech with both great speakers and a section of Start Up Alley devoted to biotech startups. (Pssst biotech founders…there is still time to win a free TC Top Picks exhibition spot in Startup Alley complete with three Founder Passes to take in all of Disrupt SF .   Apply here .) Today we’re delighted to announce a panel of three top biotech investors , who will share their perspectives on key in key trends biotech and where they are looking to make their next investments. Laura Deming is the founder and partner in the $26 million Longevity Fund,  a venture capital firm focused on biological research to reduce or reverse the effects of aging. Deming was accepted to MIT at age 14, but later dropped out to accept the $100,000 Thiel Fellowship and start a venture capital firm. Deming believes that before long we’ll retire the idea of growing old.  So far, Deming has backed  Unity Biotechnology ,  Precision Biosciences ,  Metacrine ,  Navitor , and  Alexo Therapeutics .  Nina Kjellson  is a general partner at Canaan Partners, where she  invests in biopharma and digital health companies that serve unmet needs. Kjellson serves as a mentor to Blueprint Health and Springboard Life Sciences and on the boards of Essential Access Health, and the Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Center. She holds a B.A. in human biology from Stanford University, and her recent investments  Annum Health , Dauntless , PACT Pharma , Tizona Therapeutics ,  and  Vineti.  Arvind Gupta is a general partner at  SOSV,  a $150 million early stage venture capital fund, where he founded IndieBio, a biotech accelerator based in San Francisco. IndieBio focuses on startups that will either touch a billion people or create a billion in value. Arvind received his B.S. in Genetic Engineering from UCSB and has invested in  like Memphis Meats, Synthex, Medel.AI and Catalog.  And that’s not all – we have a lot more coming in health and biotech, plus 23andMe’s Ann Wojcicki , whom we have already announced. Get your passes now !

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CloudNC scores £9M Series A led by Atomico to bring AI to manufacturing

CloudNC , the U.K. startup and Entrepreneur First alumni that is developing AI software to automate part of the manufacturing process, has quietly raised £9 million in Series A funding, TechCrunch has learned. According to sources — and since confirmed by the company — Atomico, the European VC firm founded by Skype’s Niklas Zennström, has led the round. A number of existing investors, including Episode 1 and Entrepreneur First, also participated. We first heard a term sheet had been put on the table as far back as March, and last week the investment finally closed. With the broader aim of using AI to dramatically reduce the time and costs associated with manufacturing, CloudNC is developing software and a cloud computing service that hopes to automate the programming of CNC milling machines. These machines work by carving blocks of solid metal into useful shapes, where a useful shape could be anything from a Macbook body, to bits of a car, to jet engine turbine blades. Unlike 3D printing, this happens in a ‘subtractive’ way; metal is cut out until what is left is the resulting component. The problem is that to instruct a CNC machine to turn a 3D design into a finished part requires it to be fed pre-programmed sequences of machine control commands, which currently is a highly skilled and manual process. You have to instruct the machine not just precisely where and how to cut, but also which of its hundreds of tools to use. Programming a CNC machine can also be time-consuming, taking up to 100 hours for more complicated parts. Related to this manual labour, there’s a second problem CloudNC thinks it can solve, which is the speed of manufacturing itself. That’s because, the startup claims, a human can’t possibly calculate the most efficient way to cut out a block of metal for each bespoke part being manufactured, even though it is currently extremely well-educated guess-work. However, in theory, AI combined with ‘super computing’ in the cloud, can. The result: halving the time needed to manufacture parts and therefore halving the costs (minus the raw material costs, of course)

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App Store hits 20M registered developers and $100B in revenues, 500M visitors per week

Microsoft may have just acquired developers’ favorite code repository GitHub, but it is Apple where many of them are making a lot of money at the moment. Today at WWDC, Apple’s CEO Tim Cook announced that there are now 20 million registered developers on iOS, and collectively they have made about $100 billion in revenues, with the App Store bringing in some 500 million visitors per week. “We’re also happy to announce that this week we’re going to achieve another huge milestone,” Cook said in his presentation. “The money that developers have earned through the App Store will top $100 billion.” The figures underscore how Apple’s attention has continued to swing more firmly into its developer ecosystem and app marketplace, which is becoming a stronger engine of revenue generation as overall smartphone purchasing slows down in more saturated markets. He also said that Swift, the programming language Apple developed and uses for its apps, is also picking up some strong momentum. “It’s the fastest growing programming language out there,” he said. “Apple developers are using it in huge numbers, in fact over 350,000 apps have been written in Swift in the app store. We believe that coding is an essential skill and believe it should be offered by every school in the world. Learning to code has so many benefits, it developers problem solving, critical thinking skills.”

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First speaker announcements for The Next Stage at Disrupt SF (Sept. 5-7)

One of the many new features at TechCrunch Disrupt SF (September 5-7) is the addition of another stage, which we’re calling The Next Stage. The goal of The Next Stage is to deliver more insights and wisdom to Disrupt SF attendees, especially founders, to help them navigate the startup odyssey better and faster. The Next Stage is also where much of the programming for the 13 tracks at Disrupt SF will take place. We’re delighted to announce our first sessions on The Next Stage Consumer brands take forever to earn consumer confidence, unless you happen to be brands like Casper, AllBirds, Birchbox, Rent-the-Runway and Brandless, which became powerful brand names almost overnight. What those brands have in common is Red Antler, a Brooklyn-based creative agency that has attained “brand whisperer” status according to Fast Company for its success standing up startup consumer brands. As a part of our New Retail track, Red Antler  co-founder and chief strategist Emily Heyward will join founders Tina Sharkey ( Brandless ) and Philip Krim ( Casper ) to discuss the promise and perils of early branding efforts. This session is part of the New Retail track at Disrupt, which includes speakers on both stages, as well as early-stage exhibiting startups in the New Retail section of Startup Alley. Founders who would like to be a part of the New Retail exhibit area can apply to the TC Top Picks program to win one of five completely free exhibit spots for New Retail startups. The editors pick the five top startups for each category, which get the exhibition space with special “ TC Top Picks ” signage, three free Founder Passes plus a three-minute interview on our Showcase Stage. Click here  to fill out the application, which should take about five minutes. (Note we have also launched an  updated application app , which allows founders to create a single application and use it across all of TechCrunch’s programs — including  Startup Battlefield . TechCrunch will notify the TC Top Picks winners by July 20, but applications close June 29 — so don’t lose any time,  apply today . The biggest “track” of all at Disrupt SF is How Startups Succeed , and two experts will join us on The Next Stage to connect the dots.  Eric Ries is author of the 2011 best seller, The Lean Startup , which has sold more than a million copies and remains a must-read for aspiring founders who hope to keep the burn to a minimum. The Lean Startup helped familiarize the world with “pivots” and other features of early-stage startup life, which in turn also helped investors place investments earlier than ever.  Few understand that better than August Capital  general partner David Hornik , who has 20 years of venture investing experience, launched the first blog about venture capital, (aptly named Ventureblog) and teaches the Startup Garage class at Stanford Business School (which uses the lean startup methodology).

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AT&T’s New Live TV Streaming Service Will Cost $15 – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo AT&T's New Live TV Streaming Service Will Cost $15 Ubergizmo Many companies have launched their own online TV streaming services over the past couple of years and AT&T is one of them. It launched DirecTV Now back in 2016 but if it feels a bit too expensive for your taste, you will be interested in knowing that ... and more »

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Grasshopper, a learn-to-code app from Google’s Area 120 incubator, goes live

Google’s internal incubator, Area 120, is today releasing its next creation: a learn-to-code mobile app for beginners called Grasshopper . At launch, the app teaches would-be coders how to write JavaScript, via short lessons on their iPhone or Android device. The goal is to get coders proficient in the basics and core concepts, so they can take the next steps in their coding education – whether that’s taking online classes, attending a bootcamp, or playing around in Grasshopper’s own online playground where they can create interactive animations. Like other Area 120 projects, Grasshopper was built by a small team of Googlers , who had a personal interest in working on the project. “Coding is becoming such an essential skill, and we want to make it possible for everyone to learn even when life gets busy,” the app’s About Us page explains. “We made Grasshopper to help folks like you get into coding in a fun and easy way.” Area 120 has now been around for just over two years, but Google’s hadn’t heavily publicized its efforts until last year, when it launched a dedicated website for the incubator. To date, Area 120 has released things like Advr, an advertising format for VR ; personal stylist  Tailor ; emoji messenger  Supersonic ; a job-matching service in Bangladesh, a booking tool called Appointments ; and the YouTube co-watching app UpTime . The incubator’s goal – beyond potentially finding Google’s next breakthrough product – is to retain talented engineers who may have otherwise left the company to work on their own passion projects or startups. Grasshopper – whose name is a tribute to early programming pioneer Grace Hopper – was already known to be one of the projects in the works at Area 120. However, it hadn’t launched to the public until today. The app itself offers a series of courses, beginning with “The Fundamentals,” where users learn how code works, along with various terminology like functions, variables, strings, for loops, arrays, conditionals, operators, and objects

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Popular YouTube Music Videos Defaced In Hack – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Popular YouTube Music Videos Defaced In Hack Ubergizmo Some of the most popular music videos on YouTube appear to have fallen victim to a hack today. Vevo's YouTube account was likely hacked which resulted in music videos such as Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee's “Despacito,” which also happens to be the most ... and more »

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Why 2018 will be the year apps go to the edge

If you’re running a software company today, it’s almost a foregone conclusion that most or all of your apps will run in the cloud. Likely Amazon or Google’s. It’s hard to imagine that this wasn’t always the case, but there are still some late adopters migrating their own physical data centers into managed ones. And, as with all trends in technology, this too shall pass. Just when you were getting comfortable with containers and auto-scaling, a new architecture emerges, swinging the pendulum back to a truly distributed world. What’s wrong with the cloud? A typical self-driving car generates up to 100MB of data per second from a combination of cameras, LIDARs, accelerometers and on-board computers. That data needs to be processed nearly instantly to keep the car on the road. With so much data to sift through, the current generation of cellular networks can’t keep up. By the time data arrives in the cloud, it will be too late. Instead, data needs to be processed as close to the sensors as possible, directly at the edge of networks, on the cars themselves. Most of us aren’t building or riding in self-driving cars (yet), but there’s a good chance we’re already interacting with edge computing every day. Neural networks in smart speakers in almost  40 million American homes are listening for words like “Alexa,” “Siri” or “Google” and, according to Statista, 3 billion Snapchats are scanned for faces each day in order to add the addicting face filters.

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