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ISPs and Ajit Pai are really sad about Senate’s vote for net neutrality

Enlarge / MAY 16, 2018: Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) at a press conference after a Senate vote to maintain net neutrality rules. (credit: Getty Images | Congressional Quarterly) Broadband lobby groups and FCC Chairman Ajit Pai are upset about yesterday's US Senate vote to restore net neutrality rules and are calling on Republican lawmakers to kill the effort in the House. Yesterday's Senate vote "throws into reverse our shared goal of maintaining an open, thriving Internet," said  USTelecom, which represents AT&T, Verizon, CenturyLink, and other telcos. USTelecom claimed to speak on behalf of Internet users, saying that "Consumers want permanent, comprehensive online protections, not half measures or election year posturing from our representatives in Congress." Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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After Senate victory, House announces plans to force its own vote on net neutrality

Hot on the heels of a surprising 52-47 Senate disapproval of the FCC’s new, weaker net neutrality rules, the House of Representatives will soon attempt to force a similar vote under the Congressional Review Act. Representative Mike Doyle (D-PA) announced in a statement and at a press conference following the Senate vote that he will begin the process first thing tomorrow morning. “I have introduced a companion CRA in the house,” Rep. Doyle said, “but I’m also going to begin a discharge petition which we will have open for signature tomorrow morning. And I urge every member who’s uproots a free and open internet to join me and sign this petition so we can bring this legislation to the floor.” The CRA requires Senate and House to submit the resolution itself, in the former’s case Joint Resolution 52 , after which a certain number of people to sign off on what’s called a discharge petition, actually forces a vote. Senate votes to reverse FCC order and restore net neutrality In the Senate this number is only 30, which makes it a useful tool for the minority party, which can easily gather that many votes if it’s an important issue (a full majority is still required to pass the resolution). But in the House a majority is required, 218 at present. That’s a more difficult ask, since Democrats only hold 193 seats there. They’d need two dozen Republicans to switch sides, and while it’s clear from the defection of three Senators from the party line that such bipartisan support is possible, it’s far from a done deal. Today’s success may help move the needle, though. Should the required votes be gathered, which could happen tomorrow, or take much longer, the vote will then be scheduled, though a Congressional aide I talked to was unsure how quickly it would follow. It only took a week in the Senate to go from petition to floor vote, but that period could be longer in the House depending on how the schedule works out.

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After Senate victory, House announces plans to force its own vote on net neutrality

Hot on the heels of a surprising 52-47 Senate disapproval of the FCC’s new, weaker net neutrality rules, the House of Representatives will soon attempt to force a similar vote under the Congressional Review Act. Representative Mike Doyle (D-PA) announced in a statement and at a press conference following the Senate vote that he will begin the process first thing tomorrow morning. “I have introduced a companion CRA in the house,” Rep. Doyle said, “but I’m also going to begin a discharge petition which we will have open for signature tomorrow morning. And I urge every member who’s uproots a free and open internet to join me and sign this petition so we can bring this legislation to the floor.” The CRA requires Senate and House to submit the resolution itself, in the former’s case Joint Resolution 52 , after which a certain number of people to sign off on what’s called a discharge petition, actually forces a vote. Senate votes to reverse FCC order and restore net neutrality In the Senate this number is only 30, which makes it a useful tool for the minority party, which can easily gather that many votes if it’s an important issue (a full majority is still required to pass the resolution). But in the House a majority is required, 218 at present. That’s a more difficult ask, since Democrats only hold 193 seats there. They’d need two dozen Republicans to switch sides, and while it’s clear from the defection of three Senators from the party line that such bipartisan support is possible, it’s far from a done deal. Today’s success may help move the needle, though. Should the required votes be gathered, which could happen tomorrow, or take much longer, the vote will then be scheduled, though a Congressional aide I talked to was unsure how quickly it would follow. It only took a week in the Senate to go from petition to floor vote, but that period could be longer in the House depending on how the schedule works out.

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“Dig Once” rule requiring fiber deployment is finally set to become US law

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | tiero) A simple policy that could speed up fiber Internet deployment throughout the US is finally on track to become US law. A "Dig Once" measure that requires fiber conduit installation during many federally funded road projects was passed yesterday by the US House of Representatives and is expected to pass the Senate. US Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) first submitted Dig Once legislation in 2009 and has periodically resubmitted the legislation in the years since, she said during yesterday's floor debate . The Dig Once policy "mandates the inclusion of broadband conduit—plastic pipes which house fiber-optic communications cable—during the construction of any road receiving federal funding," an announcement from Eshoo said. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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