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AT&T and Verizon investigated for possibly colluding to make your smartphone life worse – Mashable

Mashable AT&T and Verizon investigated for possibly colluding to make your smartphone life worse Mashable Notably, according to CNBC, it's not just AT&T and Verizon that are under the government's microscope. So too, reportedly, are T- Mobile and Sprint. A source told the publication that Apple filed the complaint. The Justice Department reportedly sent ... Department of Justice reportedly investigating AT&T and Verizon over collusion against eSIM technology The Verge US Investigating AT&T and Verizon Over Wireless Collusion Claim New York Times Verizon | Android and Me Android and Me all 106 news articles »

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Why Google needs to fix Android’s texting problem – Mashable

Mashable Why Google needs to fix Android's texting problem Mashable Google finally has a plan to fix Android's texting problem. This week, the company confirmed its long-rumored plan to improve messaging on Android and bring its features up to par with other popular messaging apps like Apple's iMessage. Google being ... and more »

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Google may finally have made a decent Android messaging app in Chat – Mashable

Mashable Google may finally have made a decent Android messaging app in Chat Mashable Unlike iMessage or Signal, Chat will not feature end-to-end encryption — leaving your message open to legal interception. Chat is the successor to the seemingly umpteen messaging solutions Google has cooked up for Android , including Google Plus ... Exclusive: Chat is Google's next big fix for Android's messaging mess The Verge Universal Profile - Future Networks - GSMA GSMA all 68 news articles »

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Chat is Google’s effort to make a decent Android competitor to iMessage – Mashable

Mashable Chat is Google's effort to make a decent Android competitor to iMessage Mashable Unlike iMessage or Signal, Chat will not feature end-to-end encryption — leaving your message open to legal interception. Chat is the successor to the seemingly umpteen messaging solutions Google has cooked up for Android , including Google Plus ... Exclusive: Chat is Google's next big fix for Android's messaging mess The Verge Universal Profile - Future Networks - GSMA GSMA all 134 news articles »

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Technique to beam HD video with 99 percent less power could sharpen the eyes of smart homes

Everyone seems to be insisting on installing cameras all over their homes these days, which seems incongruous with the ongoing privacy crisis — but that’s a post for another time. Today, we’re talking about enabling those cameras to send high-definition video signals wirelessly without killing their little batteries. A new technique makes beaming video out more than 99 percent more efficient, possibly making batteries unnecessary altogether. Cameras found in smart homes or wearables need to transmit HD video, but it takes a lot of power to process that video and then transmit the encoded data over wi-fi. Small devices leave little room for batteries, and they’ll have to be recharged frequently if they’re constantly streaming. Who’s got time for that? The idea behind this new system, created by a University of Washington team led by prolific researcher Shyam Gollakota, isn’t fundamentally different from some others that are out there right now. Devices with low data rates, like a digital thermometer or motion sensor, can something called backscatter to send a low-power signal consisting of a couple bytes. Backscatter is a way of sending a signal that requires very little power, because what’s actually transmitting the power is not the device that’s transmitting the data . A signal is sent out from one source, say a router or phone, and another antenna essentially reflects that signal, but modifies it. By having it blink on and off you could indicate 1s and 0s, for instance. UW’s system attaches the camera’s output directly to the output of the antenna, so the brightness of a pixel directly correlates to the length of the signal reflected. A short pulse means a dark pixel, a longer one is lighter, and the longest length indicates white. Some clever manipulation of the video data by the team reduced the number of pulses necessary to send a full video frame, from sharing some data between pixels to using a “zigzag” scan (left to right, then right to left) scan pattern. To get color, each pixel needs to have its color channels sent in succession, but this too can be optimized.

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