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Tag Archives: wearable-technology

CES 2018 Opening Day with Katie Linendoll

CES 2018 Opening Day with Katie Linendoll

**Sponsored Content** The latest in consumer electronics and technology are unveiled every year in early January from CES in Las Vegas! This year’s show begins Tuesday, January 9, 2018. Owned and produced by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA), CES 2018 is the world’s largest annual innovation event and draws more than 150,000 …

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Apple details the technology and functionality behind Apple Watch’s heart rate monitor (Sarah Guarino/9to5Mac)

Ahead of the Apple Watch making its way onto the wrists of consumers, Apple has published a new support page detailing the device’s heart rate monitor. As we know, the Apple Watch includes a heart rate reader to measure a person’s intensity during workouts. With knowledge of this intensity data, the Watch is able to more accurately measure the amount of calories a person burns per day. Additionally, a user can check their heart rate at any time using a feature known as the Heart Rate Glance. But beyond these two user functions, this new support document details the technologies behind the hardware as well as some little known software features. According to the document, the Apple Watch will silently measure your heart rate every 10 minutes. This data will be stored in the iOS 8 Health application for later viewing and integration with third-party health tracking applications and hardware. Beyond software, Apple says that the Apple Watch uses fascinating mechanics to actually get the heart rate reading: The heart rate sensor in Apple Watch uses what is known as photoplethysmography. This technology, while difficult to pronounce, is based on a very simple fact: Blood is red because it reflects red light and absorbs green light. Apple Watch uses green LED lights paired with light‑sensitive photodiodes to detect the amount of blood flowing through your wrist at any given moment. When your heart beats, the blood flow in your wrist — and the green light absorption — is greater

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