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Want to fool a computer vision system? Just tweak some colors

Research into machine learning and the interesting AI models created as a consequence are popular topics these days. But there’s a sort of shadow world of scientists working to undermine these systems — not to show they’re worthless but to shore up their weaknesses. A new paper demonstrates this by showing how vulnerable image recognition models are to the simplest color manipulations of the pictures they’re meant to identify. It’s not some deep indictment of computer vision — techniques to “beat” image recognition systems might just as easily be characterized as situations in which they perform particularly poorly. Sometimes this is something surprisingly simple: rotating an image, for example, or adding a crazy sticker . Unless a system has been trained specifically on a given manipulation or has orders to check common variations like that, it’s pretty much just going to fail. In this case it’s research from the University of Washington led by grad student Hossein Hosseini. Their “adversarial” imagery was similarly simple: switch up the colors. Probably many of you have tried something similar to this when fiddling around in an image manipulation program: by changing the “hue” and “saturation” values on a picture, you can make someone have green skin, a banana appear blue, and so on. That’s exactly what the researchers did: twiddled the knobs so a dog looked a bit yellow, a deer looked purplish, etc. The original images are at left; color-shifted versions and the systems’ best guesses at right.

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Want to fool a computer vision system? Just tweak some colors

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