Tag Archives: artist

Tidal launches desktop app and announces student discount – Mashable

Mashable Tidal launches desktop app and announces student discount Mashable ... for Mac and Windows users starting on Wednesday, Tidal confirmed to Mashable . The desktop app is a beta version. Previously, Tidal subscribers could access the service via the web and a mobile app. Unlike rival Spotify, Tidal doesn't offer a free ... and more »

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The Wapping Project Bankside at Photo London

The Wapping Project Bankside has announced its participation in Photo London, a unique photography event that will feature a major international photography fair for up to 70 of the world’s leading photography galleries. Read more and comment »

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Me You Us

A unique exhibition of photographs taken by ordinary Londoners opens 17th April in East London, providing a colourful and personal insight into the lives of 15 families. Read more and comment »

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Work, Rest and Play

The Work, Rest and Play: British Photography from the 1960s to Today exhibition presents a survey of over fifty years of British documentary, fashion and fine art photography. Read more and comment »

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All the Ways a New Apple TV Could Dominate Your Living Room – Wired

Wired All the Ways a New Apple TV Could Dominate Your Living Room Wired Imagine using your iPhone or iPad as a Wii U-style second-screen controller. Or an Apple Watch as a wrist-worn motion controller for games. OK, it appears that last one will have to wait. According to Cult of Mac and Mashable , the WatchKit SDK doesn't ... and more »

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Osmo Masterpiece is an iPad app aimed at kids that uses the front-facing camera, a proprietary mirror, and AI to train people how to draw (Dean…

Gaming execs:   Join 180 select leaders from King, Glu, Rovio, Unity, Facebook, and more to plan your path to global domination in 2015.  GamesBeat Summit is invite-only -- apply here . Ticket prices increase on April 3rd! Osmo is turning out to be wonderfully creative at making apps for children that redefine the meaning of games and play. After a big debut last year, today the Silicon Valley startup is proving that again with Osmo Masterpiece , an app that enables kids and adults to become digital artists and regain confidence in their ability to draw. If you’ve ever been afraid to show somebody something you’ve drawn, you know what I mean. At a time when standardized testing is taking over classrooms, it’s nice to see an invention that gives children the skills to express themselves creatively. With Osmo Masterpiece, the child can snap a picture of anything or anyone. Then you attach Osmo’s reflective mirror to the iPad and activate an app that taps into Osmo’s artificial intelligence technology. The app uses computer vision to analyze the scene and produce a rough sketch of the object you have photographed. It lays out the important lines that you could use to create a drawing of that image. Then the kid can set a piece of paper in front of the iPad and trace the lines that Osmo suggests on the image on the iPad screen. The mirror enables the iPad’s camera to capture the movement of the child’s writing instrument and translate it into the image so you can see lines being drawn on the screen. Those lines are guided by the child’s own hand movements.

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Valve to show SteamVR hardware, final version of Steam Controller, and new Steam devices at GDC (Christian Nutt/Gamasutra)

Today Valve announced that it plans to showcase previously-unannounced SteamVR hardware at GDC next week, alongside new iterations of the long-awaited Steam Machines hardware and the final version of the Steam Control ler. Valve has plans to showcase a  "family" of both Steam Machines and "new living room devices" at the show, it says. So the focus will not be solely on the PC-like Steam Machines  announced in 2013  (which were last showcased  over a year ago .) The company had  already promised  that Steam Machines would be "front and center" at next week's show.  As for virtual reality, Valve had already added a SteamVR section to its popular download service, but this is the first confirmation that it plans to launch its own hardware device. VR R&D had long been ongoing at the Valve, but several high-profile departures, including Michael Abrash , left us wondering about the state of its efforts. The Steam Controller has also been in development for a long time, albeit more publicly. Valve last talked about the device in May 2014, promising its release for 2015 .  Developers and publishers who wish to schedule an appointment to see the company's new offerings can do so via this link . 

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Study finds music labels take 73.1% of profits from streaming services; artists get 10.9% (Mike Masnick/Techdirt)

A small group of very vocal musicians has decided that the new target of their anger, after attacking cyberlockers, search engines and torrent sites, should be legal, authorized streaming services. They've decided that the payouts from these services are simply too low , even though almost none of these services are anywhere close to profitable, and most are handing out the vast majority of their revenue to copyright holders. The complaints are often nonsensical. Way back in 2012, we noted that the target of these musicians' anger appeared to be misplaced, as the CEO of Merlin (which represents a ton of indie labels) admitted that the real problem was that Spotify paid lots of money to labels and it was the labels not giving that money to the artists . Yet, rather than blaming their own labels (or their own contracts), these artists lashed out at Spotify and other streaming services. Just a few months ago, we covered this issue again , with even Bono admitting that the real problem was the lack of transparency from the labels. And, it appears, there's a decent reason why those labels haven't been eager to be transparent: because they're keeping most of the money . The Music Business Worldwide site has the details on a new report put together by Ernst & Young with the French record label trade group SNEP, concerning where the money from streaming services Deezer and Spotify ends up. Spoiler alert: it's not with the artists. Here's the overall share of the 9.99 Euros that people pay for a premium account on these services: As you can see, the labels get the lion's share, with songwriters/publishers splitting 10% and the performers getting less than 7%. And, if you look at the specifics of the actual post-tax payout, you can see the contrast more starkly: The labels end up with nearly 75% of the total payout, with actual artists and songwriters left with the scraps. Of course, since this project was paid for by SNEP, which represents the major labels, it then tries to spin this as being not only perfectly fair, but a good thing for the artists themselves.

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