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Tag Archives: belgium

EA Teases Command & Conquer Remasters | Ubergizmo – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo EA Teases Command & Conquer Remasters | Ubergizmo Ubergizmo RTS games these days aren't quite as common as back in the day, when titles like Age of Empires, StarCraft, Red Alert, and Command & Conquer were some of ... Command & Conquer remasters could be tank-rushing their way onto the PC TechRadar C&C Update from EA : commandandconquer - Reddit Reddit OpenRA - A Special Announcement from EA OpenRA all 87 news articles »

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New Relic acquires Belgium’s CoScale to expand its monitoring of Kubernetes containers and microservices

New Relic , a provider of analytics and monitoring around a company’s internal and external facing apps and services to help optimise their performance, is making an acquisition today as it continues to expand a newer area of its business, containers and microservices. The company has announced that it has purchased CoScale , a provider of monitoring for containers and microservices, with a specific focus on Kubernetes. Terms of the deal — which will include the team and technology — are not being disclosed, as it will not have a material impact on New Relic’s earnings. The larger company is traded on the NYSE (ticker: NEWR) and has been a strong upswing in the last two years, and its current market cap its around $4.6 billion. Originally founded in Belgium, CoScale had raised $6.4 million and was last valued at $7.9 million, according to PitchBook . Investors included Microsoft (via its ScaleUp accelerator), PMV and the Qbic Fund, two Belgian investors. “ We are thrilled to bring CoScale’s knowledge and deeply technical team into the New Relic fold,” noted Ramon Guiu, senior director of product management at New Relic. “The CoScale team members joining New Relic will focus on incorporating CoScale’s capabilities and experience into continuing innovations for the New Relic platform.” The deal underscores how New Relic has had to shift in the last couple of years: when the company was founded years ago, application monitoring was a relatively easy task, with the web and a specified number of services the limit of what needed attention. But services, apps and functions have become increasingly complex and now tap data stored across a range of locations and devices, and processing everything generates a lot of computing demand. New Relic first added container and microservices monitoring to its stack in 2016 .

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Shadow announces a new box for its cloud gaming service

French startup Blade, the company behind Shadow , is updating its physical box that lets you connect to your cloud computer instance. Shadow Ghost is a tiny device that provides all the ports and wireless technologies that you need to plug to a TV or a monitor and start playing. Shadow has been building a cloud computing service for gamers. For $35 per month, you get a gaming PC in a data center near you. Shadow gives you 8 threads on an Intel Xeon 2620 processor, an Nvidia Quadro P5000 GPU that performs more or less as well as an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080, 12GB of RAM and 256GB of storage. It’s a full Windows 10 instance and you can do whatever you want with it. The company started with a dedicated box from day one. The first Shadow box was an oddly-shaped black box with a few USB ports and DisplayPorts. This way, you could replace your PC at home with this box and use the same peripherals. When you turn it on, it feels like you’re booting up your gaming PC, but you’re actually just starting a computer with a low-powered CPU that connects to your gaming PC in the cloud. Over the past few months, Shadow has slowly decorrelated the service from the physical device in your home. When you subscribe, you don’t get a box by default

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3D printed guns are now legal… What’s next?

Jon Stokes Contributor Jon Stokes is one of the founders of Ars Technica , an author , and a former Wired editor. He currently hacks ruby at Collective Idea , and runs AllOutdoor.com . More posts by this contributor How President Trump could abuse big data and the surveillance state How Intel missed the iPhone revolution On Tuesday, July 10, the DOJ announced a landmark settlement with Austin-based Defense Distributed , a controversial startup led by a young, charismatic anarchist whom Wired once named one of the 15 most dangerous people in the world. Hyper-loquacious and media-savvy, Cody Wilson is fond of telling any reporter who’ll listen that Defense Distributed’s main product, a gun fabricator called the Ghost Gunner, represents the endgame for gun control, not just in the US but everywhere in the world. With nothing but the Ghost Gunner, an internet connection, and some raw materials, anyone, anywhere can make an unmarked, untraceable gun in their home or garage. Even if Wilson is wrong that the gun control wars are effectively over (and I believe he is), Tuesday’s ruling has fundamentally changed them. At about the time the settlement announcement was going out over the wires, I was pulling into the parking lot of LMT Defense in Milan, IL. LMT Defense, formerly known as Lewis Machine & Tool, is as much the opposite of Defense Distributed as its quiet, publicity-shy founder, Karl Lewis, is the opposite of Cody Wilson. But LMT Defense’s story can be usefully placed alongside that of Defense Distributed, because together they can reveal much about the past, present, and future of the tools and technologies that we humans use for the age-old practice of making war. The legacy machine Karl Lewis got started in gunmaking back in the 1970’s at Springfield Armory in Geneseo, IL, just a few exits up I-80 from the current LMT Defense headquarters. Lewis, who has a high school education but who now knows as much about the engineering behind firearms manufacturing as almost anyone alive, was working on the Springfield Armory shop floor when he hit upon a better way to make a critical and failure-prone part of the AR-15, the bolt. He first took his idea to Springfield Armory management, but they took a pass, so he rented out a small corner in a local auto repair ship in Milan, bought some equipment, and began making the bolts, himself. Lewis worked in his rented space on nights and weekends, bringing the newly fabricated bolts home for heat treatment in his kitchen oven. Not long after he made his first batch, he landed a small contract with the US military to supply some of the bolts for the M4 carbine. On the back of this initial success with M4 bolts, Lewis Machine & Tool expanded its offerings to include complete guns

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