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Tag Archives: brides-cond

Chipworks: Both Samsung and TSMC are making the A9 chip for Apple (Andrew Cunningham/Ars Technica)

Enlarge / Chipworks confirms that both Samsung and TSMC are manufacturing subtly different A9 processors for Apple. Further Reading The only thing that most people will need to know about Apple's A9 is that it's a whole lot faster than last year's A8. But for those of you who are more interested in chip design, Chipworks has unearthed an interesting tidbit : there are two different versions of the A9 chip, one manufactured by Samsung and another by Taiwan Semiconductor (TSMC). Most interestingly, Samsung's version (the APL0898) has a slightly smaller footprint than the TSMC version (APL1022). There have long been  rumors  that Apple was dual-sourcing the A8 from Samsung and TSMC, but this is the first visual proof that we've seen of the practice. iPhone and iPad processors up to and including the A7 were all made by Samsung. Apple buys other parts from multiple sources including NAND flash and RAM, but the SoC is a major component with bigger implications for performance and power. Chipworks promises a more in-depth look at how the two processors are different, but for now, all we know is that they differ in size. We have no way to confirm whether the chips in our review samples  were made by Samsung or TSMC. iFixit's teardowns found the Samsung version of the A9 in the iPhone 6S and TSMC's version in the iPhone 6S Plus, which makes sense—a larger phone has more room to spare for a larger chip—but that doesn't necessarily mean that all of the phones are being put together this way. In our testing, both the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus benchmarked nearly identically, and both behaved well during Geekbench's thermal throttling test. For more information, our full review of the new iPhones is here

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iOS 9’s space-saving "app slicing" disabled for now, will return in future update (Andrew Cunningham/Ars Technica)

Enlarge / Apple's sample universal binary here is just 60 percent of its original size when downloaded to an iPad or iPhone. Andrew Cunningham Further Reading Back in June, we wrote a bit about App Thinning , a collection of iOS 9 features that are supposed to make iOS 9 apps take up less space on iDevices. Apple has just announced to developers that one of those features, "app slicing," is not available in current iOS 9 versions due to an iCloud bug. It will be re-enabled in a future iOS update after the bug has been resolved. App slicing ensures that your iDevice only downloads the app assets it needs to work. In older versions of iOS, all devices downloaded "universal" versions of apps that included all of the assets those apps needed to work on each and every targeted iDevice. If you downloaded an app to your iPhone 5, for example, it could include larger image assets made for the larger-screened iPhones 6 and 6 Plus, 64-bit code that its 32-bit processor couldn't use, and Metal graphics code that its GPU didn't support. That's all wasted space, a problem app slicing was designed to resolve. Apple says the iCloud bug affects users who are restoring backups to new devices—if you moved from that iPhone 5 to a new iPhone 6S, for example, iCloud would restore iPhone 5-compatible versions of some apps without the assets required by the newer, larger device. For now, Apple says that devices running iOS 9 will continue to download the universal versions of apps along with all their assets, whether they're needed by your specific device or not.  TestFlight , the beta app distribution service that Apple purchased in 2014, will continue to distribute software tailored for specific devices, but regular users will need to wait for that iOS update before they begin to see the feature's benefits.

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Minecraft Windows 10 edition will launch on Oculus Rift in 2016 (Sam Machkovech/Ars Technica)

The second day of this year's Oculus Connect conference for virtual reality developers kicked off with an announcement-rich keynote presentation. While the event was short on new game announcements, one big one got the crowd's attention: Minecraft . A brief video confirmed that the hit game's Windows 10 edition will launch on the Oculus Rift "next year," and it will allow players to navigate their blocky worlds in VR with the Xbox One controller. Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe confirmed that the Oculus Touch handheld controller system will launch in the "second quarter next year," which is a firmer confirmation than a previous "first half of 2016" estimate . After showing off that system's impressive "toybox" demo, Iribe confirmed that the Touch controllers will require a second motion sensor "for improved sensing," so be ready to make room in your home's potential VR room should you want to try the tech out. The Touch sizzle reel confirmed that a few previously SteamVR exclusive games would now also launch for Oculus Touch, including Job Simulator and The Gallery: Six Elements . It also had Oculus' own answer to SteamVR's Tilt Brush, a "digital clay molding" art app called Medium . "Every great platform has to have a paint app, and this is our paint app," Iribe told the Oculus Connect crowd. Epic Games' Bullet Train. Additionally, Epic Games' Tim Sweeney took the stage to show off  Bullet Train , an upcoming VR action game for Oculus Touch that includes  a warping mechanic much like SteamVR's The Gallery: Six Elements , meaning characters may potentially be able to move around the world without experiencing VR nausea. Since virtual reality gaming on PCs demands incredibly powerful performance —particularly to support a 90 frames-per-second visual refresh, in order to reduce nausea and discomfort—Oculus announced a new "Oculus Ready" initiative through which computer manufacturers can slap a sticker on a PC that meets Oculus Rift's performance minimums. Announced partners for the program include Asus, Dell, and Alienware (itself a wholly owned Dell subsidiary). Oculus wanted the crowd to know that there's no shortage of interested Oculus developers, so they took the opportunity to announce that "over 200,000" developers had registered to create games for the new VR platform

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Active malware campaign has hijacked thousands of WordPress sites in just 15 days, has spiked to over 5K new infections daily (Dan Goodin/Ars…

This is what happens at the network level when a browser visits an infected site. Malwarebytes Attackers have hijacked thousands of websites running the WordPress content management system and are using them to infect unsuspecting visitors with potent malware exploits, researchers said Thursday. The campaign began 15 days ago, but over the past 48 hours the number of compromised sites has spiked, from about 1,000 per day on Tuesday to close to 6,000 on Thursday, Daniel Cid, CTO of security firm Sucuri, said in a blog post . The hijacked sites are being used to redirect visitors to a server hosting attack code made available through the Nuclear exploit kit , which is sold on the black market. The server tries a variety of different exploits depending on the operating system and available apps used by the visitor. "If you think about it, the compromised websites are just means for the criminals to get access to as many endpoint desktops as they can," Cid wrote. "What’s the easiest way to reach out to endpoints? Websites, of course." On Thursday, Sucuri detected thousands of compromised sites, 95 percent of which are running on WordPress. Company researchers have not yet determined how the sites are being hacked, but they suspect it involves vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins. Already, 17 percent of the hacked sites have been blacklisted by a Google service that warns users before they visit booby-trapped properties.

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Malicious Cisco router backdoor found on 79 more devices, 25 in the US (Dan Goodin/Ars Technica)

The highly clandestine attacks hitting Cisco Systems routers are much more active than previously reported. Infections have hit at least 79 devices in 19 countries, including an ISP in the US that's hosting 25 boxes running the malicious backdoor. That discovery comes from a team of computer scientists who probed the entire IPv4 address space for infected devices. As Ars reported Tuesday, the so-called SYNful Knock router implant is activated after receiving an unusual series of non-compliant network packets followed by a hardcoded password. By sending only the out-of-sequence TCP packets but not the password to every Internet address and then monitoring the response, the researchers were able to detect which ones were infected by the backdoor. Further Reading Security firm FireEye surprised the security world on Tuesday when it first reported the active outbreak of SYNful Knock. The implant is precisely the same size as the legitimate Cisco router image, and it's loaded each time the router is restarted. It supports up to 100 modules that attackers can tailor to the specific target. FireEye found it on 14 servers in India, Mexico, the Philippines, and Ukraine. The finding was significant, because it showed an attack that had long been theorized was in fact being actively used. The new research shows it's being used much more widely, and it's been found in countries including the US, Canada, the UK, Germany, and China

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Google OnHub teardown shows large speaker, huge heatsink, lots of antennas, and a light sensor that doesn’t yet work (Ron Amadeo/Ars Technica)

The Google OnHub, in pieces. Even after our review of Google's OnHub router , the device is still a mystery. Today Google is selling a $200 Wi-Fi router with an abundance of processing power that promises to some day be a smart home device. We're guessing it will power the "Google On" smart home ecosystem, but Google isn't talking about any details today. Further Reading Perhaps the mad scientists over at iFixit can shed some light on the device. They recently ripped open the Google OnHub, displaying its internals for all the world to see. They found lots and lots of antennas, a huge heatsink, and it was mostly held together with clips. The big surprise is the sizable speaker that sits at the top of the device. During setup, the speaker emits a loud ringtone-like sound that pairs the OnHub with a phone, but the OnHub speaker is much larger than what you would find in a smartphone. It's still a far cry from Amazon's woofer/tweeter combo in the Echo, though. iFixit was able to confirm that the odd little "plug" in the speaker grill is really an ambient light sensor, which Google told us doesn't work yet. There's also a Silicon Labs EM3581 SOC network co-processor for ZigBee and Skyworks 66109 2.4 GHz ZigBee/Smart Energy front-end module, which are also dormant.

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Comcast tests letting Florida customers pay an extra $30 per month to avoid 300GB data cap (Jon Brodkin/Ars Technica)

Comcast has unveiled a new $30 charge that will let customers in Florida escape the company's 300GB monthly usage limit. Further Reading The nation's largest cable company has been trialling data caps in nine states, with slightly different policies in each one. Generally, customers who exceed a monthly limit pay an extra $10 for each additional 50GB, though customers are allowed to exceed the caps for three months before getting penalized. But customers in Fort Lauderdale, the Keys, and Miami, Florida, can now purchase unlimited data for an extra $30 per month. Paying this additional $30 eliminates the 300GB monthly cap, but customers have to pay the extra amount each month even if they use less than 300GB. "The Unlimited Data Option costs the current additional fee of $30 per calendar month, regardless of actual data usage," Comcast said in an FAQ updated today . (Thanks to  DSLReports for noticing the change .) Customers who use more than 450GB per month may come out ahead by purchasing the unlimited data option. "For example, if you enroll in the Unlimited Data Option and use 530GB in a given month, you will only be charged $30 for choosing to enroll in the Unlimited Data Option," Comcast says. "If you do not enroll in the Unlimited Data Option, you would be on the 300GB plan and therefore would be charged $50 for the additional 250GB (five blocks of additional 50GB) provided on top of the 300GB plan. Note that customers enrolled in the Unlimited Data Option who use less than 300GB in a given month will still be charged $30 for that month." The unlimited data option hasn't been made available to the other eight states  where Comcast is imposing usage limits. Those are Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, Tennessee, and South Carolina. Within the trial areas, customers who buy the pricey 505Mbps or 2Gbps plans don't face data limits . Customers who live outside the data cap trial states don't face any limits or overage charges regardless of what plan they buy, but Comcast may impose limits throughout its territory within a few years . If you're wondering how Comcast settled on a 300GB data cap, a company VP recently said  that it's a business decision rather than one driven by technical necessity.

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Pwn2Own loses HP as its sponsor amid concerns of compliance with the Wassenaar Arrangement, an international treaty that has rules governing software…

The next scheduled Pwn2Own hacking competition has lost Hewlett-Packard as its longstanding sponsor out of legal concerns that the company could run afoul of recent changes to an international treaty that governs software exploits. Dragos Raiu, organizer of both Pwn2Own and the PacSec West security conference in Japan, said HP lawyers spent more than $1 million researching the recent changes to the so-called Wassenaar Arrangement. He said they ultimately concluded that the legal uncertainty and compliance hurdles were too high for them to move forward. "I am left being kind of grumpy now that HP is not involved," Raiu told Ars. He said that he plans to organize a scaled-down hacking competition to fill the void at this year's conference, which is scheduled for November 11 and 12. Pwn2Own has become one of the more closely followed events among security professionals. The hacking competition offers hundreds of thousands of dollars for exploits that target software vulnerabilities found in Windows, OS X, iOS, and Android. Besides highlighting the relative ease of exploiting bugs, the contest allows HP's Tipping Point division to update its intrusion prevention software with definitions that detect and block such attacks. Raiu said HP pulled out this year following changes made earlier this year to the Wassenaar arrangement . It added specific curbs around the exports of "intrusion malware" and "intrusion exploits." Raiu said Japan's implementation of Wassenaar is so vague and cumbersome that they expose researchers and organizers to a high amount of legal uncertainty. What, for instance, is the status of thumbdrives containing exploit software that was debugged at the last minute in Japan and is then brought back to the US, where Tipping Point is headquartered. By contrast, Raiu said Canada's implementation of Wassenaar was much more clear and simpler to comply with. That likely explains why HP sponsored the Pwn2Own competition in March at the CanSecWest conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. HP released a statement that read: Due to the complexity of obtaining real-time import/export licenses in countries that participate in the Wassenaar Arrangement, the ZDI has notified conference organizer, Dragos Ruiu, that it will not be holding the Pwn2Own contest at PacSecWest in November.

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Improved Simplocker Android malware disguises as an NSA app, has infected tens of thousands of devices using XMPP (Sean Gallagher/Ars Technica)

Apparently, NSA only takes payment via PayPal for penalties for bad app downloads? That doesn't seem right... A new variant of mobile ransomware that encrypts the content of Android smartphones is putting a new spin on both how it communicates with its masters and how it spurs its victims into action. The updated version of Simplocker masquerades on app stores and download pages as a legitimate application, and uses an open instant messaging protocol to connect to command and control servers. The malware requests administrative permissions to sink its hooks deep into Android. Once it's installed, it announces itself to some victims by telling them it was planted by the NSA—and to get their files back, they'll have to pay a "fine." Ofer Caspi of Check Point's malware research team wrote in a report posted this week that the team has "evidence that users have already paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to get their files "unencrypted" by this new variant. He estimates that the number of infected devices so far numbers in the tens of thousands, but may be much higher. Because the software can't easily be removed once it is installed, and because the files it encrypts can't be recovered without it, victims have no choice but to either pay $500 to get their files decrypted or  wipe the device and start from scratch. While posing as a legal or governmental authority to intimidate the victim into paying up is not new, the use of Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP), the instant messaging protocol used by Jabber and previously by GTalk, is a shift in tactics to evade detection by anti-malware tools. XMPP communication makes it more difficult for security and anti-malware tools to catch the ransomware before it can communicate with its command and control network because it conceals the communication in a form that looks like normal instant message communications. Most previous ransomware packages have communicated with a website over HTTPS to obtain encryption keys; those websites can generally be identified by their URLs, IP addresses, or the signature of their Web requests and then blocked. An application making a secure HTTP request to a suspicious destination would be a good sign that something bad was afoot. But the XMPP communications channel used by the new Simplocker variant uses an external Android library to communicate with the command and control network through a legitimate messaging relay server.

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Journalists arrested on terrorism charges in Turkey for using crypto software (Glyn Moody/Ars Technica)

Three journalists working with Vice News have been charged with "engaging in terrorist activity" on behalf of ISIL (ISIS), because one of them used encryption software. A Turkish official told Al Jazeera : "The main issue seems to be that the journalists' fixer uses a complex encryption system on his personal computer that a lot of ISIL militants also utilise for strategic communications." There are no details as to what that "complex encryption system" might be, but it seems likely that it is nothing more than the PGP email encryption software, or perhaps the The Onion Router (TOR) system, both of which are very widely used, and not just by ISIL. The correspondent and cameraman for Vice News, who are both British, and their fixer , who is Iraqi but Turkey-based, were arrested last Thursday in Diyarbakir, located in south-eastern Turkey, and an important centre for the country's Kurdish population. According to The Guardian , the Vice News journalists were covering "recent clashes between Turkish security forces and the Patriotic Revolutionary Youth Movement, the youth wing of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)." Further Reading Exposing those tensions would not have endeared them to the Turkish authorities, and the real reason for their arrest may be to stop them reporting on this sensitive issue. What is particularly troubling, however, is that it seems the mere use of encryption software is enough for three journalists to be arrested on terrorism charges. As Ars has reported, this demonisation of crypto is not confined to foreign lands. The UK prime minister, David Cameron, has said he does not intend to "leave a safe space—a new means of communication—for terrorists to communicate with each other," whatever that means in practice. Similarly, law enforcement officials on both sides of the Atlantic have warned of things " going dark " because of the growing use of encryption by criminals. The latest move by the Turkish authorities is simply one more attempt to paint crypto as inherently suspicious, perhaps with a view to making its use explicitly illegal at some point. This post originated on Ars Technica UK

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PhantomAlert files suit against Waze, claims Waze copied its database, incorporated it into its own application before sale to Google (Cyrus…

Further Reading PhantomAlert , a company that makes a Waze-like traffic smartphone app, has now sued its better-known rival for copyright infringement. The Washington DC-based company argues in a Tuesday filing that after a failed data-sharing deal between itself and Waze collapsed in 2010, within two years, Waze apparently stole PhantomAlert’s "points of interest" database. As the civil complaint states : Among other methods, PhantomAlert determined that Waze had copied its Points of Interest database by observing the presence of fictitious Points of Interest in the Waze application, which PhantomAlert had seeded into its own database for the purpose of detecting copying. On information and belief, Waze copied the PhantomAlert database on multiple occasions after late 2012, re-incorporated the copied data into the Waze application, and continued to display the Points of Interest data to the users of the Waze application. Then, as the case alleges, when Waze was sold to Google in June 2013, the company profited handsomely from this theft. "Waze needed to grow its database to increase its value and become more attractive to potential acquirers," Karl Kronenberger, PhantomAlert’s attorney, said in a statement . "Our complaint alleges that Waze stole PhantomAlert’s database when Waze could not get it legally, and then sold itself to Google for over $1 billion." The lawsuit asks the court to shut down Waze entirely, and to order Google to pay unspecified damages. “I started PhantomAlert seven years ago as an entrepreneur with a dream, and now that dream has been crushed by companies that are profiting from the years of blood, sweat and tears our team put into our product," Joseph Scott Seyoum, PhantomAlert's CEO, said in the same statement. Kronenberger did not respond to Ars’ request for comment as to how exactly this database was stolen. Google also did not immediately respond to Ars’ request for comment.

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Snapdragon 820’s custom CPU is twice as fast, efficient as disappointing 810 (Andrew Cunningham/Ars Technica)

Qualcomm Further Reading Qualcomm's new Snapdragon 820 flagship won't actually ship in any phones before early 2016, but the company continues to dole out bits of information ahead of the launch . Today it's talking in very broad terms about the CPU, which is based on a brand-new custom 64-bit architecture called Kryo. Kryo is Qualcomm's official successor to Krait, the CPU architecture used in a wide range of Snapdragon chips from the S4 all the way up to the 805. The toasty Snapdragon 810 used a mix of off-the-shelf ARM Cortex A57 and A53 CPU cores to bring 64-bit ARMv8 compatibility to high-end phones while Qualcomm finished its own architecture. Kryo, which will initially run at clock speeds up to 2.2GHz, promises to be twice as fast as the 810 while also being twice as power efficient. Some of this is no doubt due to architectural improvements, but it will help that the 820 will be built on a 14nm FinFET manufacturing process—Qualcomm doesn't name its manufacturing partner, but Samsung is the most likely candidate. The Kryo CPU cores in the 820 will be accompanied by a new Adreno 530 GPU , the first in the Adreno 500-series of products. The GPU will support the latest OpenGL ES, OpenCL, and Vulkan APIs, and Qualcomm says that it will be 40 percent faster and 40 percent more power efficient than the Adreno 430 in the 810. Phones and tablets are such tightly integrated devices that we'll need to see shipping hardware before we can really say how well the Snapdragon 820 performs, but Qualcomm's early numbers all paint an optimistic picture. © 2015 Condé Nast. All rights reserved Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (effective 1/2/14) and Privacy Policy (effective 1/2/14), and Ars Technica Addendum (effective 5/17/2012) Your California Privacy Rights The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices

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Popcorn Time lawsuits continue as 16 are sued for watching Survivor (Joe Mullin/Ars Technica)

Plaintiffs included a screenshot from the Popcorn Time app, with their movie circled in red. The "Popcorn Time" app was launched in 2014 as a kind of "BitTorrent for dummies" with a simple Netflix-style interface for viewing movies. But now with a second lawsuit filed against users of the app, it looks like 16 as-yet-anonymous watchers may soon need a primer on "mass copyright suits for dummies." The lawsuit (PDF) , entitled  Survivor Productions Inc. v. Anonymous Users of Popcorn Time (Does 1-16) , targets 16 Comcast subscribers who allegedly used the app to watch Survivor— not the reality series, but a thriller starring Pierce Brosnan released earlier this year. Lawsuits over BitTorrent piracy of non-pornographic content are rare to begin with. Survivor Productions now joins Voltage Pictures in being one of just a few movie studios willing to pursue individual downloaders over copyright claims. "The fight against counterfeiting and piracy are critical issues of importance to the both the United States of America and the State of Oregon," states the complaint. "Popcorn Time exists for one purpose and one purpose only: to steal copyrighted content." The complaint includes warnings from the Popcorn Time software as exhibits, and it notes that the movie Survivor was promoted to users of the app. The Survivor Productions lawsuit is nearly identical to another lawsuit against Popcorn Time users filed four days earlier over the Adam Sandler movie The Cobbler . Both were filed by the same attorney, Oregon-based practitioner Carl Crowell. In an earlier e-mail interview with Ars, Crowell said his client does not seek more than the statutory minimum for damages, which is $750. "The goal is to deter infringement," he said. In addition to the Popcorn Time lawsuit, Survivor Productions filed 12 lawsuits against individual users who allegedly used standard BitTorrent technology to get their copies. The suits were filed between July 13 and August 21

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Former Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges pleads guilty to theft of $820K in bitcoin during Silk Road investigation (Joe Mullin/Ars Technica)

SAN FRANCISCO—Shaun Bridges, a former Secret Service agent who was investigating the Silk Road drug trafficking website, pled guilty today to charges of money laundering and obstruction of justice. Bridges' scheme was straightforward and very profitable. After Silk Road admin Curtis Green was arrested in January 2013, he debriefed agents in Baltimore. Bridges took his admin credentials, logged in, and started locking Silk Road drug dealers out of their accounts. He then looted the accounts, grabbing about 20,000 Bitcoins, and put them into his own account. US District Judge Richard Seeborg read out each of the government accusations against Bridges in court today, and the man responded "yes sir," acknowledging he had committed each of the acts. Shaun Bridges Bridges moved the Bitcoins into his Mt. Gox account. They were worth more than $300,000 at the time of the theft. Bridges moved the money into a Fideltity account called Quantum International Investments LLC between March and May of that year. By then, the bitcoins were worth about $820,000. Bridges also pled guilty to obstructing the Baltimore investigation of Silk Road and later to the internal investigation of his own behavior. At one point, he talked to a colleague who was being interviewed and agreed "to tell a consistent story" about his unauthorized use of a FINCEN database. The plea agreement includes sentencing recommendations, but it isn't known what those are at this time. "You understand these are simply recommendations, and it will be for me to decide what the appropriate sentence is?" Seeborg asked. "I do," said Bridges

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Former FireEye intern pleads guilty to developing Dendroid spyware for Android; sentencing scheduled for Dec. 2 (Dan Goodin/Ars Technica)

A former intern at security firm FireEye has admitted in federal court that he designed a malicious software tool that allowed attackers to take control of other Android phones so they could spy on their owners. Morgan Culbertson, 20, pleaded guilty to federal charges involving Dendroid, a software tool that provided everything needed to develop highly stealthy apps that among other things took pictures using the phone's camera, recorded audio and video, downloaded photos, and recorded calls. According to this 2014 blog post from Android security firm Lookout, at least one app built with Dendroid found its way into the official Google Play market, in part thanks to code that helped it evade detection by Bouncer, Google’s anti-malware screening system. Culbertson, who last month was one of 70 people arrested in an international law enforcement sting targeting the Darkode online crime forum , said in a LinkedIn profile that he spent four months at FireEye. While there, he said, he "improved Android malware detection by discovering new malicious malware families and using a multitude of different tools." He was also a student at Carnegie Mellon University. According to The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette , Culbertson on Tuesday pleaded guilty to developing and selling the malicious tool kit . Culbertson advertised the malware on Darkode for $300, and he also offered to sell the source code, presumably for a much higher price, that would allow buyers to create their own version of Dendroid. He faces a maximum 10 years in prison and $250,000 in fines at sentencing, which is scheduled for December 2. Culbertson said he had spent more than a year designing Dendroid, a timeline that means he worked on the remote access toolkit during or shortly after his four-month tenure at FireEye. FireEye told Forbes that   Culbertson has been suspended from any future work at the company.

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