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Tag Archives: chrome

Google appears to be developing a teleconferencing tool called GMeet (Chance Miller/9to5Google)

First noticed by Florian Kiersch on Google+ , Google appears to be testing a new meetings service. Google Meetings, also referred to as GMeet, appears to allow users to schedule and join teleconference calls with one click. Instead of having to dial into a teleconference call, one user could create a meeting topic in GMeet, then invite everyone else to the call. People who received an invite would be able to then join the call with a single click. More than likely, GMeet uses Google Hangouts as a base for its functionality with additional features added for enterprise customers. Presumably GMeet will be catered towards users of Google Apps for Work and offer an enterprise-friendly interface. The leaked screenshots show an Android app, although Kiersch also claims that Google has a Chrome Extension for GMeet in development. Currently, GMeet is in testing and only available to people that work at Google, although it appears that it will eventually rollout to more users. Phandroid points out that GMeet and Google Meeting searches return code strings from as far back as 2011. “Most of the code references things we already have access to in the latest rendition of Hangouts, such as whiteboards, screen sharing, and integration with Google Calendar,” the website reports. This supports the belief that Google Meetings is powered by Hangouts, with only a different interface and a few adjusted features added.

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Audit of Truecrypt software finds minor issues, no deliberate backdoors or severe design flaws (Matthew Green/A Few Thoughts …)

A few weeks back I wrote an update on the Truecrypt audit  promising that we'd have some concrete results to show you soon. Thanks to some hard work by the NCC Crypto Services group, soon is now. We're grateful to Alex, Sean and Tom, and to Kenn White at OCAP for making this all happen. You can find the full report over at the Open Crypto Audit Project website . Those who want to read it themselves should do so. This post will only give a brief summary. The TL;DR is that based on this audit, Truecrypt appears to be a relatively well-designed piece of crypto software. The NCC audit found no evidence of deliberate backdoors, or any severe design flaws that will make the software insecure in most instances. That doesn't mean Truecrypt is perfect. The auditors did find a few glitches and some incautious programming -- leading to a couple of issues that could, in the right circumstances, cause Truecrypt to give less assurance than we'd like it to. For example: the most significant issue in the Truecrypt report is a finding related to the Windows version of Truecrypt's random number generator (RNG), which is responsible for generating the keys that encrypt Truecrypt volumes. This is an important piece of code, since a predictable RNG can spell disaster for the security of everything else in the system. The Truecrypt developers implemented their RNG based on a 1998 design  by Peter Guttman that uses an entropy pool to collect 'unpredictable' values from various sources in the system, including the Windows Crypto API itself

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Apple’s Trade-in Program: Now in Android Flavor – Bitbag

Apple's Trade-in Program: Now in Android Flavor Bitbag From the Mashable article, Apple has announced that Android-users will now be able to trade-in their phones for a new iPhone 6 via the iPhone Reuse and Recycle program. This isn't exclusively for iPhone users, though; Blackberry and Windows phones ... and more »

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Acer is launching an all-in-one Chromebase desktop with a touchscreen this summer (Nathan Ingraham/The Verge)

While Google's Chromebooks are finding a measure of success in certain markets, Chrome OS hasn't exactly found much traction in other form factors, like the Mac mini-esque Chromebox or all-in-one Chromebase. That's not stopping Acer from offering up its own take on the all-in-one desktop — the company just announced its own Chromebase. Unlike the Chromebase that LG  first introduced in late 2013 , this one has a new hardware trick — its 21.5-inch, 1080p display is a giant touchscreen. Chrome OS form factors beyond the laptop haven't really caught on yet The utility of such a screen remains a bit in question, however. Unlike Windows, Chrome OS isn't exactly designed with touch in mind — but that's slowly starting to change. Google  announced a touchscreen Chromebook from Asus that can be used in tablet mode yesterday, and alongside it will be a few tweaks to Chrome OS that'll make it a bit more touch-friendly. When you consider the fact that Android apps will soon be coming to Chrome OS as well, those touchscreens make a lot more sense than they did a year ago. Unfortunately, Acer is keeping mum about the rest of the hardware inside its new Chromebase — all we know right now is that it runs on Nvidia's Tegra K1 processor. Given the size of the screen, though, we're hoping this machine has 4GB of RAM onboard. We expect storage will be the typically minimum amount included in a Chrome OS machine, but Acer is including 100GB of Google Drive storage for two years. There's no pricing info yet, either — we've reached out to Acer to try and find more details. If this kind of machine fits your needs, Acer will sell you one sometime during Q2.

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Google says 5% of its visitors have ad injectors installed, disables 192 deceptive Chrome extensions (Frederic Lardinois/TechCrunch)

According to a study Google conducted with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, 5 percent of people visiting Google’s sites and services now have at least one ad injector installed. When it comes to malware, ad injectors may seem relatively benevolent at first. They put an ad on your Google Search page that didn’t belong there, for example. That’s annoying, but doesn’t seem dangerous. But ad injection was pretty much what Lenovo’s Superfish was doing and that created plenty of security issues for users. Indeed, the research, which is based on the analysis of 100 million pageviews across Google’s sites from Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer, classified about a third of these injectors as “outright malware.” Given that these kinds of ad injectors are often bundles with legitimate software — and desktop developers and download sites often see them as a relatively easy way to make a bit of extra money with their installers and download wrappers  — it’s easy enough to install one of them inadvertently. Google and the Berkeley researchers found that ad injectors are now available on all major platforms and browsers. Out of those 5 percent of users that have at least one installed, one-third actually had four of them running simultaneously and half were running two. Clearly, there is a group of users that is a bit more prone to catching one of these than others. Google says it is publishing these numbers (and a more detailed research report on May 1) to raise awareness about ad injectors. “Unwanted ad injectors aren’t part of a healthy ads ecosystem,” Google Safe Browsing engineer Nav Jagpal writes in today’s announcement. “They’re part of an environment where bad practices hurt users, advertisers and publishers alike. ” Given that these programs inject themselves between the browser and the website, and change the website’s code, browsers have a hard time figuring out which ads are legitimate and which ones are not. “In broader terms, the question of just who ultimately controls the information presented to users is of great and increasing importance – it’s one of the most vital issues the digital world faces,” UC Berkeley EECS professor Vern Paxson noted in a statement today.

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Meet the Asus Chromebook Flip, a $249 Chrome OS tablet with a 360-degree hinge (Melissa Riofrio/PC World)

Image: Melissa Riofrio On Tuesday, Google announced the $249 Asus Chromebook Flip. As the first mainstream Chrome device to offer a 360-degree hinge, the Flip can function as a tablet as well as a laptop. (Lenovo was first to offer a Chrome OS convertible with its ThinkPad Yoga 11e last year, but that model was meant primarily for education, and was chunkier and pricier that most people would like.) By the time the Chromebook Flip ships—in six to eight weeks, Google says—Google will also release version 42 of Chrome OS, with updates to improve the touch experience. Google says highlights will include the ability to flip the display image, an onscreen keyboard, handwriting recognition, and “full offline capabilities.” What this means for you: The Asus Chromebook Flip marks a big evolutionary step for an ecosystem that’s already on a roll. In the past two years, Chromebook manufacturers have branched out from their primitive, plasticky beginnings, introducing models with bigger displays, touchscreens, and faster chips. Google manufacturers its own stunning flagship, the  Chromebook Pixel , now in its second generation. But until the Flip, there’s never been a mainstream convertible that’s designed for express use as a tablet. As the Chrome OS platform receives better app support as well, users have fewer and fewer reasons to care whether a system is based on Windows, Mac, or Chrome.  Image: Melissa Riofrio The Asus Chromebook Flip, shown here in tablet mode, offers two USB 3.0 ports, a mini-HDMI port, and an SD card slot, plus an audio jack.  The Chromebook Flip, with its 10.1-inch display, is smaller than most Chromebooks, which have displays measuring 11.6 inches and up. You might forgive the loss of real estate given that the display uses the superior IPS technology, and its resolution is full HD (1366x768 pixels). An all-metal chassis gives the Chromebook Flip the promise of durability, and yet the device is light—less than 2 pounds, Google says. Image: Melissa Riofrio The slender Asus Chromebook Flip has DC, volume control, and power buttons on one side.  The Chromebook Flip squeezed an adequate supply of connectivity into its slender profile. On one side, you’ll see two USB 2.0 ports, an SD card slot, HDMI, and an audio jack

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Google Drive for Work and Google for Education get new security features including admin alerts, ability to set sharing settings by department (Scott…

Posted by: Scott Johnston, Director of Product Management, Google Drive Since we launched Drive for Work 9 months ago, we've watched as more and more businesses moved to the cloud — and seen that they prioritize data security as much as we do. Security ranks at the top of the list of concerns that companies have about moving to the cloud, which is why we’ve  put security front and center in our products from the beginning. And to keep your company’s data even more secure in Drive, we’re launching new sharing controls, alerts and audit events to Google Drive for Work and Google for Education over the next several weeks. For Google Drive for Work customers: Set sharing settings by department Sometimes different file settings make sense. You might, for example, have a research department that needs to keep information confidential and a sales team that needs to share presentations with their clients. To help manage these different sharing needs, now when you make selections in Drive settings from the Admin console, you can turn off sharing outside the domain for one organizational unit , while still allowing others to work and share files with anyone they need to. Create custom Drive alerts and track more events with Drive audit To keep track of when specific actions are taken in Drive, you can set up custom Drive alerts . So if you want to know when a file containing the word “confidential” in the title is shared outside the company, now you’ll know. And there are more events coming to Drive audit, including download, print and preview. For all Google Apps for Work customers: Set up custom admin alerts to find out when things change There are lots of moving parts to running a company, and now it’s easier for IT to find out about the things they care about with  custom alerts  — like when a new app is installed or a shared calendar is deleted — and get those right in their inbox.

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Indian government mandates that all systems used by its public sector are deployed on open source software (Eileen Yu/ZDNet)

Summary: Country's Ministry of Communication and Information Technology releases new policy that makes it mandatory for all e-government systems to be deployed on open source software. The Indian government has decreed the use of open source software across all systems used by the public sector, mandating that all Request for Proposals (RFPs) to instruct suppliers to consider the use of such applications. Latest news on Asia China claims it is a cyber victim as GitHub DDoS rolls on ​ZDNet readers' favorite operating systems: Windows, iOS, and Android Wireless chargers for the Samsung Galaxy S6/S6 Edge Dual-tone HTC One E9+ with quad HD display appears on HTC China site Galaxy S6: Most of the bloatware can be removed In its policy unveiled this week, the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology said open source adoption was necessary to support the government's goal to transform India into a "digitally empowered society and a knowledge economy". It added that the country had always advocated the use of open standards and open source technologies in the public sector to tap the touted economic benefits of doing so. "The government of India shall endeavor to adopt open source software in all e-government systems implemented by various government organizations, as a preferred option in comparison to closed source software," the ministry wrote. The policy states that all open source software deployed must be built on source codes that are available for the community and implementer to study, modify, and redistribute in copies of the original or modified software. Its source codes also must be free from any forms of royalty. The policy applies to both central and state governments in India, and must be observed for all new e-government applications and systems as well as new versions of legacy and existing systems. RFPs must include a specific requirement for all suppliers to consider open source software, along with closed source software, when they submit their bids for the project. Should they choose to exclude open source, suppliers are to provide justification for doing so in their bids.

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