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Tag Archives: cloud-native

Decipher Technology Studios Announces Silver Membership with the Cloud…

Decipher Technology Studios, the leader in cognitive service mesh operations for the enterprise, announced it is now a silver member of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), a sub-foundation... (PRWeb February 09, 2019) Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/decipher_technology_studios_announces_silver_membership_with_the_cloud_native_computing_foundation_cncf/prweb16089629.htm

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Prometheus monitoring tool joins Kubernetes as CNCF’s latest ‘graduated’ project

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) may not be a household name, but it houses some important open source projects including Kubernetes , the fast-growing container orchestration tool . Today, CNCF announced that the Prometheus monitoring and alerting tool had joined Kubernetes as the second “graduated” project in the organization’s history. The announcement was made at PromCon , the project’s dedicated conference being held in Munich this week. According to Chris Aniszczyk, CTO and COO at CNCF, a graduated project reflects the overall maturity where it has reached a tipping point in terms of diversity of contribution, community and adoption. For Prometheus that means 20 active maintainers, more than 1,000 contributors and more than 13,000 commits. Its contributors include the likes of DigitalOcean, Weaveworks, ShowMax and Uber. CNCF projects start in the sandbox, move onto incubation and finally to graduation. To achieve graduation level, they need to adopt the CNCF Code of Conduct, have passed an independent security audit and defined a community governance structure. Finally it needs to show an “ongoing commitment to code quality and security best practices,” according to the organization. Aniszczyk says the tool consists of a time series database combined with a query language that lets developers search for issues or anomalies in their system and get analytics back based on their queries. Not surprisingly, it is especially well suited to containers . Like Kubernetes, the project that became Prometheus has its roots inside Google . Google was one of the first companies to work with containers and developed Borg (the Kubernetes predecessor) and Borgmon (the Prometheus predecessor). While Borg’s job was to manage container orchestration, Borgmon’s job was to monitor the process and give engineers feedback and insight into what was happening to the containers as they moved through their lifecycle.

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Four years after its release, Kubernetes has come a long way

On June 6th, 2014 Kubernetes was released for the first time. At the time, nobody could have predicted that 4 years later that the project would become a de facto standard for container orchestration or that the biggest tech companies in the world would be backing it. That would come later. If you think back to June 2014, containerization was just beginning to take off thanks to Docker, which was popularizing the concept with developers, but being so early there was no standard way to manage those containers. Google had been using containers as a way to deliver applications for years and ran a tool called Borg to handle orchestration. It’s called an orchestrator because much like a conductor of an orchestra, it decides when a container is launched and when it shuts down once it’s completed its job. At the time, two Google engineers, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, who would later go on to start Heptio , were looking at developing an orchestration tool like Borg for companies that might not have the depth of engineering talent of Google to make it work. They wanted to spread this idea of how they develop distributed applications to other developers. Hello world Before that first version hit the streets, what would become Kubernetes developed out of a need for an orchestration layer that Beda and McLuckie had been considering for a long time. They were both involved in bringing Google Compute Engine, Google’s Infrastructure as a Service offering, to market, but they felt like there was something missing in the tooling that would fill in the gaps between infrastructure and platform service offerings. “We had long thought about trying to find a way to bring a sort of a more progressive orchestrated way of running applications in production. Just based on our own experiences with Google Compute Engine, we got to see firsthand some of the challenges that the enterprise faced in moving workloads to the cloud,” McLuckie explained. He said that they also understood some of the limitations associated with virtual machine-based workloads and they were thinking about tooling to help with all of that. “And so we came up the idea to start a new project, which ultimately became Kubernetes.” Let’s open source it When Google began developing Kubernetes in March 2014, it wanted nothing less than to bring container orchestration to the masses

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Helm moves out of Kubernetes’ shadow to become stand-alone project

Helm is an open source project that enables developers to create packages of containerized apps to make installation much simpler. Up until now, it was a sub-project of Kubernetes , the popular container orchestration tool , but as of today it is a stand-alone project. Both Kubernetes and Helm are projects managed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee approved the project earlier this week. Dan Kohn, executive director at the CNCF says the two projects are closely aligned so it made sense for Helm to be a sub-project up until now. “What’s nice about Helm is that it’s just an application on top of Kubernetes. Kubernetes is an API and Helm accesses that API. If you want you to install this package, you access the Kubernetes API, and it pulls this many containers and pods and it handles all of the steps involved to do that,” Kohn explained. This ability to package up a set of requirements allows you to repeat the installation process in a consistent way. “Helm addresses a common user need of deploying applications to Kubernetes by making their configurations reusable,” Brian Grant, principal engineer at Google and Kubernetes (and a member of the TOC) explained in a statement. Packages are known as “charts,” which consist one or more containers. Kohn says for example, you might want to deploy a chart that includes WordPress and MariaDB in a single container.

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As Kubernetes grows, a startup ecosystem develops in its wake

Kubernetes , the open source container orchestration tool, came out of Google several years ago and has gained traction amazingly fast. With each step in its growth , it has created opportunities for companies to develop businesses on top of the open source project. The beauty of open source is that when it works, you build a base platform and an economic ecosystem follows in its wake. That’s because a project like Kubernetes (or any successful open source offering) generates new requirements as a natural extension of the growth and development of a project. Those requirements represent opportunities for new projects, of course, but also for startups looking at building companies adjacent that open source community. Before that can happen however, a couple of key pieces have to fall into place. Ingredients for success For starters you need the big corporates to get behind it. In the case of Kuberentes, in a 6 week period last year in quick succession between July and the beginning of September, we saw some of the best known enterprise technology companies including  AWS ,  Oracle ,  Microsoft ,  VMware and Pivotal  all join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the professional organization behind the open source project. This was a signal that Kubernetes was becoming a standard of sorts for container orchestration. Surely these big companies would have preferred (and tried) to control the orchestration layer themselves, but they soon found that their customers preferred to use Kubernetes and they had little choice, but to follow the clear trend that was developing around the project. Photo: Georgijevic on Getty Images The second piece that has to come together for an open source community to flourish is that a significant group of developers have to accept it and start building stuff on top of the platform — and Kubernetes got that too. Consider that according to CNCF, a total of 400 projects have been developed on the platform by 771 developers contributing over 19,000 commits since the launch of Kubernetes 1.0 in 2015 . Since last August, the last date for which the CNCF has numbers, developer contributions had increased by 385 percent.

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Microsoft’s Azure Container Instances are now generally available

If you wanted to play modern software development buzzword bingo, talking about Azure Container Instances (ACI) would surely help you tick a few boxes. The service, which made its debut last July and which is now generally available, gives developers a serverless way to run Linux and Windows containers that frees them from having to even think about Kubernetes clusters and the like. There are no virtual machines to manage and scaling is not an issue. At its core, ACI is all about simplicity and flexibility. Developers decide how much memory and compute cores they need and ACI handles the rest. As Microsoft’s director of Azure Compute Corey Sanders told me, in his view, serverless is all about invisible infrastructure, microbilling and an event-driven programming model. With serverless containers, you get the first two (with CPU and memory usage billed by the second), without being tied to the event-driven model. Sanders also stressed this service treats containers like a first-class citizen on the Azure platform. “ACI is like a VM — but a container,” he said. Another feature of ACI that Sanders highlighted was the built-in isolation, something you’d usually get by default with a virtual machine.

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