Tag Archives: digest-golf

AT&T launches gigabit fiber in parts of Cupertino, with prices from $110/month, $40 more than it charges in cities where it competes with Google Fiber…

AT&T AT&T today launched its gigabit fiber Internet service in parts of Cupertino, California, but the price isn't as good as it is in cities where AT&T faces competition from Google Fiber. Google Fiber and AT&T's U-verse with GigaPower compete head-to-head in Kansas City and Austin. In those cities, AT&T matches Google's $70-per-month price for gigabit service, as long as you opt into a program that lets AT&T watch your Web browsing and serve up personalized ads . Further Reading But AT&T charges more when it doesn't have to compete against Google. In Cupertino, AT&T said today  it will offer "Internet speeds up to 1Gbps starting as low as $110 a month, or speeds at 300Mbps as low as $80 a month, with a one-year price guarantee." Despite being $40 more than AT&T's price for the same gigabit service in Kansas City and Austin, the Cupertino offer still requires opting in to the Internet usage monitoring. Google has tentative plans for fiber service in nearby San Jose but hasn't announced a decision yet. In Dallas, another city where AT&T doesn't have to compete against Google, it charges $120 a month for gigabit service. In North Carolina, AT&T reportedly dropped pricing from $120 to $70 after Google announced plans to expand into that state. AT&T's GigaPower is now available  in seven metro areas nationwide; AT&T says it plans to bring the fiber service to another 10 metro areas and is exploring an additional eight for possible deployments. AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson last year claimed the company would "pause" its fiber investments because of the Federal Communications Commission decision to regulate broadband service more forcefully. AT&T quickly backtracked  and today said  it is still "considering expanding its all-fiber network to up to 100 cities and municipalities across 25 markets." AT&T also  claims  it needs federal approval of its purchase of DirecTV to further expand its fiber plans. CenturyLink is expanding its gigabit fiber deployments with new plans for 505 multi-unit housing developments in Utah. Meanwhile, Google announced last week that it will bring its fiber service to Salt Lake City. Google Fiber also just filed a business registration in Colorado , though the company says it has no concrete plans for that state. Verizon has more extensive fiber deployments than Google, AT&T, or CenturyLink, but is done expanding .

Read More »

Valve to offer HTC Vive Developer Edition for free initially; sign-ups begin as soon as next week with kits shipping later in spring (Kyle Orland/Ars…

Our own Sebastian Anthony reacts to the price of the HTC Vive Developer Edition. Sebastian Anthony With its Rift development kit program , Oculus has charged $300 to $350 to tens of thousands of developers (and doubtless some ultra-early-adopting consumers) who wanted to get their hands on early versions of the headset. Valve is going in a different direction with the Vive VR headset it's developing in conjunction with HTC, offering an early Developer Edition for free to qualified developers. So far, Valve and HTC have seeded kits to a handful of specially chosen developers, including Owlchemy Labs ( Aaaaaa! For The Awesome ), Bossa Studios ( Surgeon Simulator, I Am Bread ), Fireproof Games ( The Room ), and Cloudhead Games ( The Gallery ). Others will have to wait; "more info and 'sign up' forms will be available to all interested developers, big or small, via a new site coming soon," Valve spokesperson Doug Lombardi told Ars Technica. The current hope is to get the sign-up site up and running next week, Lombardi says. Approved developers will get a Developer Edition kit that "will be free, at least initially," Lombardi said. Those kits will start shipping later in the spring as part of an "ongoing effort" to get the development hardware out widely ahead of a planned 2014 consumer launch. The decision to release it for free is interesting given that HTC Connected Products Marketing Executive Director Jeff Gattis recently said consumers should expect "a slightly higher price point" for the final version of the hardware. Further Reading Demand for what's sure to be a limited number of free development kits is likely to be extremely high, but Lombardi hasn't addressed how developers will be prioritized to receive the hardware. While developers "big and small" will be welcome to apply for consideration, it's unclear what kind of mix will be chosen to get access to the first available Developer Edition units. It's also unclear just how many development kits will be available in the initial batch of spring shipments. HTC notes on its developer page that the Vive Developer Edition will be available "to select developers" in spring, and it  offers an e-mail list  for further updates. Valve's SteamVR landing page notes that the Developer Edition "comes with a headset, two controllers and two base stations—everything you need to dive in and start creating new interactive VR experiences." Unlike Oculus' Rift distribution plan, Valve's system should make it more difficult for members of the general public (and the press) to get their hands on still-in-development hardware ahead of the consumer release. This has been the standard operating procedure for gaming hardware for most of the industry's history—most everyday consumers never get a chance to sample an upcoming console until it's available on store shelves.

Read More »

Tennessee’s attorney general wants court to set aside FCC’s municipal broadband ruling (Jon Brodkin/Ars Technica)

Tennessee state capitol. The State of Tennessee is fighting for its right to enforce a law that prevents municipal broadband networks from providing Internet service to other cities and towns. Tennessee filed a  lawsuit Friday  against the Federal Communications Commission, which last month voted to preempt state laws in Tennessee and North Carolina that prevent municipal broadband providers from expanding outside their territories. The FCC cited its authority granted in 1996 by Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act, which requires the FCC to encourage the deployment of broadband to all Americans by using "measures that promote competition in the local telecommunications market, or other regulating methods that remove barriers to infrastructure investment ." (Emphasis ours.) Further Reading In Tennessee, the Electric Power Board (EPB) of Chattanooga offers Internet and video service to residents, but state law prevented it from expanding outside its electric service area to adjacent towns that have poor Internet service. Tennessee is one of about 20 states that impose some type of restriction on municipal broadband networks, helping protect private Internet service providers from competition. Tennessee isn't going to give up its restriction on municipal broadband without a fight. "The FCC has unlawfully inserted itself between the State of Tennessee and the State’s own political subdivisions," Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery wrote in the state's petition to the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. "The State of Tennessee, as a sovereign and a party to the proceeding below, is aggrieved and seeks relief on the grounds that the Order: (1) is contrary to the United States Constitution; (2) is in excess of the Commission’s authority; (3) is arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion within the meaning of the Administrative Procedure Act; and (4) is otherwise contrary to law." It's no surprise that the FCC is facing a lawsuit over its decision, as this is the first time the commission has tested its Section 706 authority by preempting state laws restricting municipal broadband. Despite Tennessee's lawsuit, there are members of the state legislature who want to get rid of the restrictions on municipal broadband. Legislation in the state Senate  and House  would eliminate the provisions of state law that prevent municipal electric utilities from offering broadband and video service outside their electric service footprint. The legislation is scheduled for markups today, but AT&T and other telecom companies are lobbying against it, Communications Daily reported . One of Tennessee's representatives in Congress, US Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN),  introduced legislation to overturn the FCC's municipal broadband decision. The Tennessee restriction dates to 1999 , when the legislature authorized municipal electric systems to provide Internet access and cable TV, but only within their electric service areas

Read More »

Ars Technica obtains the Oakland Police Department’s database of 4.6M license plate scans through a public records request (Cyrus Farivar/Ars…

Further Reading OAKLAND, Calif.—If you have driven in Oakland any time in the last few years, chances are good that the cops know where you’ve been, thanks to their 33 automated license plate readers (LPRs). Now Ars knows too. In response to a public records request, we obtained the entire LPR dataset of the Oakland Police Department (OPD), including more than 4.6 million reads of over 1.1 million unique plates between December 23, 2010 and May 31, 2014. The dataset is likely the largest ever publicly released in the United States—perhaps in the world. After analyzing this data with a custom-built visualization tool, Ars can definitively demonstrate the data's revelatory potential. Anyone in possession of enough data can often—but not always—make educated guesses about a target’s home or workplace, particularly when someone’s movements are consistent (as with a regular commute). Enlarge / This map shows all the times that the OPD has seen Ars editor Cyrus Farivar's car between October 2012 and May 2014. Cyrus Farivar For instance, during a meeting with an Oakland city council member, Ars was able to accurately guess the block where the council member lives after less than a minute of research using his license plate data. Similarly, while "working" at an Oakland bar mere blocks from Oakland police headquarters, we ran a plate from a car parked in the bar's driveway through our tool. The plate had been read 48 times over two years in two small clusters: one near the bar and a much larger cluster 24 blocks north in a residential area—likely the driver's home. “Where someone goes can reveal a great deal about how he chooses to live his life," Catherine Crump , a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley, told Ars.

Read More »

Google warns of unauthorized TLS certificates trusted by almost all OSes (Dan Goodin/Ars Technica)

In the latest security lapse involving the Internet's widely used encryption system, Google said unauthorized digital certificates have been issued for several of its domains and warned misissued credentials may be impersonating other unnamed sites as well. The bogus transport layer security certificates are trusted by all major operating systems and browsers, although a fall-back mechanism known as public key pinning prevented the Chrome and Firefox browsers from accepting those that vouched for the authenticity of Google properties, Google security engineer Adam Langley wrote in a blog post published Monday . The certificates were issued by Egypt-based MCS Holdings , an intermediate certificate authority that operates under the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC). The Chinese domain registrar and certificate authority, in turn, is included in root stores for virtually all OSes and browsers. The issuance of the unauthorized certificates represents a major breach of rules established by certificate authorities and browser makers. Under no conditions are CAs allowed to issue certificates for domains other than those legitimately held by the customer requesting the credential. In early 2012, critics blasted US-based CA Trustwave for doing much the same thing and Langley noted an example of a France-based CA that has also run afoul of the policy. Langley wrote: We promptly alerted CNNIC and other major browsers about the incident, and we blocked the MCS Holdings certificate in Chrome with a CRLSet push. CNNIC responded on the 22nd to explain that they had contracted with MCS Holdings on the basis that MCS would only issue certificates for domains that they had registered. However, rather than keep the private key in a suitable HSM , MCS installed it in a man-in-the-middle proxy. These devices intercept secure connections by masquerading as the intended destination and are sometimes used by companies to intercept their employees’ secure traffic for monitoring or legal reasons

Read More »

Trade group led by AT&T and Verizon sues FCC to overturn net neutrality (Jon Brodkin/Ars Technica)

The Federal Communications Commission's new net neutrality rules haven't taken effect yet, but they're already facing lawsuits from Internet service providers. One such lawsuit was filed today by USTelecom , which is led by  AT&T, Verizon, and others. Another lawsuit was filed by a small Internet service provider in Texas called Alamo Broadband. ( The Washington Post  flagged the lawsuits .) Further Reading The net neutrality order , which reclassifies broadband providers as common carriers and imposes rules against blocking and discriminating against online content, "is arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion," USTelecom alleged in its petition to the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The order "violates federal law, including, but not limited to, the Constitution, the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and FCC regulations promulgated thereunder." The order also violates notice-and-comment rulemaking requirements, the petition said. The petitions don't go into any more detail on the Internet service providers' arguments. The timing is an issue; the FCC's rules haven't been published in the Federal Register and do not go into effect until 60 days after publication. USTelecom's suit says it "is filing this protective petition for review out of an abundance of caution... in case the FCC's Order (or the Declaratory Ruling part of that Order) is construed to be final on the date it was issued (as opposed to after Federal Register publication, which USTelecom believes is the better view)." Parties have ten days to file lawsuits from whichever date of publication ends up being the significant one. The full order was posted on the FCC's website on March 12 . The DC Circuit threw out similarly early appeals from Verizon and MetroPCS to the FCC’s first net neutrality order back in April 2011 , calling them premature. Verizon ultimately filed after the correct date and won , forcing the FCC to start over. “We believe that the petitions for review filed today are premature and subject to dismissal,” an FCC spokesperson told Ars. Lawsuits are also likely to be filed by the National Cable & Telecommunications Association and CTIA-The Wireless Association, the major trade groups representing cable and wireless operators. Trade groups, rather than individual Internet providers, are expected to lead the fight against the FCC this time around.

Read More »

Windows 10 to make the Secure Boot alt-OS lock out a reality (Peter Bright/Ars Technica)

In Windows 8, OEMs must allow Secure Boot to be disabled. They won't have to in Windows 10. Those of you with long memories will recall a barrage of complaints in the run up to Windows 8's launch that concerned the ability to install other operating systems—whether they be older versions of Windows, or alternatives such as Linux or FreeBSD—on hardware that sported a "Designed for Windows 8" logo. To get that logo, hardware manufacturers had to fulfil a range of requirements for the systems they built, and one of those requirements had people worried. Windows 8 required machines to support a feature called UEFI Secure Boot. Secure Boot protects against that interferes with the boot process in order to inject itself into the operating system at a low level. When Secure Boot is enabled, the core components used to boot the machine must have correct cryptographic signatures, and the UEFI firmware verifies this before it lets the machine start. If any files have been tampered with, breaking their signature, the system won't boot. This is a desirable security feature, but it has an issue for alternative operating systems: if, for example, you prefer to compile your own operating system, your boot files won't include a signature that Secure Boot will recognize and authorize, and so you won't be able to boot your PC. However, Microsoft's rules for the Designed for Windows 8 logo included a solution to the problem they would cause: Microsoft also mandated that every system must have a user-accessible switch to turn Secure Boot off, thereby ensuring that computers would be compatible with other operating systems.

Read More »

Evolution of the smartwatch, like the smartphone, will be a multi-year, multi-vendor effort, with Apple Watch now contributing app-centric approach…

This screen is important. Apple As much as patent and trade-dress lawsuits would like to stop it, getting to today's idea of a modern, mature smartphone was a collaborative effort. Apple laid the foundation with the first iPhone, which popularized the idea of a finger-driven all-screen device with an on-screen keyboard and later added an app store. Google later came up with now-standard functionality like a pull-down notification panel, voice input, and a heavy cloud component. Even Samsung helped out by giving the world the phablet and leading the charge toward larger screen sizes—today even Apple makes a 5.5-inch phone. Smartwatches will be a collaborative effort, too. Every new product advances the conversation of what these tiny wrist computers should be, and yesterday Apple gave a long, impassioned speech on the matter. And it was mostly stuff Android Wear did already. At least, the feature set mostly matched Android Wear. Feature sets aren't what make a device, though. The biggest change Apple is bringing to the smartwatch is its approach to apps.

Read More »

Google’s Project Loon balloons can cover an area the size of Rhode Island with LTE; remote locations still the primary targets for commercial service…

Getting ready for launch. Google Google’s plan to deliver Internet service from balloons in the stratosphere has come a long way since being unveiled in June 2013. Further Reading A single “Project Loon” balloon can now remain in the air for more than six months and provide 4G LTE cellular service to an area the size of Rhode Island, according to Google. Company officials have taken to calling Loon balloons “cell towers in the sky.” While there’s no announced date for a widespread service launch, Google has provided Internet to a school in Brazil and is partnering with cellular operators Vodafone New Zealand, Telstra in Australia, and Telefónica in Latin America. The US probably won’t be the first place Loon powers a commercial service. Google is aiming to get more people in developing countries on the Internet (and that’s good for Google’s business, since a lot of those people will use Google services). “For some countries, having Internet once a day for an hour is a huge deal,” Google software engineer Johan Mathe, who plays a key role designing Loon’s navigation system, told Ars in a phone interview last week. Rather than offer Internet service itself as it does with Google Fiber, Google’s Project Loon is building technology that can integrate with the networks run by cellular operators. Telco operators can send signals from existing cell towers to Google’s balloons, and then the balloons send the signals down to smartphones and other cellular-connected devices. While Google says one balloon can cover an area the size of Rhode Island, the coverage area is really bigger than that because one balloon can send its signal to another balloon, which can then send Internet signals down to the ground.

Read More »

Stop the presses: HTTPS-crippling "FREAK" bug affects Windows after all (Dan Goodin/Ars Technica)

Computers running all supported versions of Microsoft Windows are vulnerable to "FREAK," a bug disclosed Monday that for more than a decade has made it possible for attackers to decrypt HTTPS-protected traffic passing between vulnerable end-users and millions of websites . Microsoft confirmed the vulnerability in an advisory published Thursday . A vulnerability-scanning service at FREAKAttack.com , a site that offers information about the bug, confirmed the advisory, showing that the latest version of IE 11 running on a fully patched Windows 7 machine was susceptible. Previously, it was believed that the Windows system was immune to the attacks. FREAK attacks—short for Factoring attack on RSA-EXPORT Keys—are possible when an end-user with a vulnerable device connects to a vulnerable HTTPS-protected website. Vulnerable sites are those configured to use a weak cipher that many presumed had been retired long ago. In analyses immediately following Monday's disclosure of FREAK, it was believed Android devices, iPhones and Macs from Apple, and smartphones from Blackberry were susceptible. The addition of Windows dramatically increases the number of users known to be vulnerable. Attackers who are in a position to monitor traffic passing between vulnerable users and vulnerable servers can inject malicious packets into the flow that will cause the two parties to use a weak 512-bit encryption key while negotiating encrypted Web sessions. Attackers can then collect some of the resulting exchange and use cloud-based computing from Amazon or other services to factor the website's underlying private key. The process requires about seven hours and $100.

Read More »

US air traffic control computer system vulnerable to terrorist hackers (David Kravets/Ars Technica)

The US system for guiding airplanes is open to vulnerabilities from outside hackers, the Government Accountability Office said Monday. The weaknesses that threaten the Federal Aviation Administration's ability to ensure the safety of flights include the failure to patch known three-year-old security holes, the transmission and storage of unencrypted passwords, and the continued use of "end-of-life" key servers. The GAO said that deficiencies in the system that monitors some 2,850 flights at a time has positioned the air traffic system into an "increased and unnecessary risk of unauthorized access, use or modification that could disrupt air traffic control operations ." What's more, the report said the FAA "did not always ensure that sensitive data were encrypted when transmitted or stored." That information included stored passwords and "authentication data." Among the findings: While the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has taken steps to protect its air traffic control systems from cyber-based and other threats, significant security control weaknesses remain, threatening the agency's ability to ensure the safe and uninterrupted operation of the national airspace system (NAS). These include weaknesses in controls intended to prevent, limit, and detect unauthorized access to computer resources, such as controls for protecting system boundaries, identifying and authenticating users, authorizing users to access systems, encrypting sensitive data, and auditing and monitoring activity on FAA's systems. Additionally, shortcomings in boundary protection controls between less-secure systems and the operational NAS environment increase the risk from these weaknesses. The flying public's safety is in jeopardy until there's a fix to the system used at some 500 airport control towers, the GAO said . (PDF) "Until FAA effectively implements security controls, establishes stronger agency-wide information security risk management processes ... the weaknesses GAO identified are likely to continue, placing the safe and uninterrupted operation of the nation's air traffic control system at increased and unnecessary risk." The report chided the agency for failing to perform basic functions: Additionally, the agency did not always ensure that security patches were applied in a timely manner to servers and network devices supporting air traffic control systems, or that servers were using software that was up-to-date. For example, certain systems were missing patches dating back more than 3 years. Additionally, certain key servers had reached end-of-life and were no longer supported by the vendor. As a result, FAA is at an increased risk that unpatched vulnerabilities could allow its information and information systems to be compromised

Read More »

The state of Linux gaming in the SteamOS era (Kyle Orland/Ars Technica)

Aurich Lawson For decades after Linux's early '90s debut, even the hardest of hardcore boosters for the open source operating system had to admit that it couldn't really compete in one important area of software: gaming. "Back in around 2010 you only had two choices for gaming on Linux," Che Dean, editor of Linux gaming news site Rootgamer recalls. "Play the few open source titles, Super Tux Kart and so on, or use WINE to play your Windows titles." Ask anyone who was involved in the relatively tiny Linux gaming scene before this decade, and you'll get a similar response. "For a long time, it was just me porting games, and I did my best, but an industry that has an employee pool of one isn't a big industry," said veteran Linux programmer Ryan C. Gordon, who has worked on over 75 Linux gaming ports over the last 15 years. "It was slow for years on end with only a few decent commercial releases becoming available," Gaming on Linux site editor Liam Dawe agreed. Further Reading That began to slowly change around 2010, when The Humble Indie Bundle launched with an insistence that every included game come with a Linux option (thanks in no small part to the fact that Linux players were some of the most generous in the bundle's pay-what-you-want scheme). It also didn't hurt when services like Desura and Ubuntu Software Center appeared around the same time, giving Linux gamers a few user-friendly centralized repositories to purchase and organize their games. But there's one primary reason that Linux gamers can enjoy nearly 1,000 professional, commercially distributed games today , and it goes by the name of Valve. "At the end of 2013, when Valve released the beta of SteamOS everything changed," Dean said. "After years of promoting the various Linux distributions, we had a major gaming company not just porting their games to Linux, but actually creating their own Linux-based operating system. It was an incredibly exciting moment and a turning point for Linux users." Now, more than a year into the SteamOS era (measuring from that beta launch), the nascent Linux gaming community is cautiously optimistic about the promise of a viable PC gaming market that doesn't rely on a Microsoft OS

Read More »

Verizon mocks FCC ruling with Morse code response dated 1934, despite using Title II to its benefit (Jon Brodkin/Ars Technica)

Verizon is just so mad at the Federal Communications Commission today that a normal press release wouldn't do. After all, Verizon issues so many press releases denouncing the FCC for trying to regulate telecommunications that today's vote on net neutrality required a special one to make sure it would be remembered. So Verizon wrote it in morse code and set the date as "1934" to make the point that the FCC is taking us backward in time. Verizon sent out the press release in this e-mail: Verizon After some more morse code, Verizon says, "Readers living in the 21st century can read the translated statement here ." That statement is dated February 26, 1934, the same year Congress passed the Communications Act, including the Title II part that the FCC is using to regulate broadband providers. Verizon Of course, this is the same Verizon that in 2012 claimed that net neutrality violates its First and Fifth Amendment rights . That happened after Verizon sued to overturn the FCC's 2010 net neutrality rules. (Verizon won that case, leading directly to today's FCC decision.) Net neutrality "infringes broadband network owners’ constitutional rights," Verizon said in its  2012 argument . "It violates the First Amendment by stripping them of control over the transmission of speech on their networks. And it takes network owners’ property without compensation by mandating that they turn over those networks for the occupation and use of others at a regulated rate of zero, undermining owners’ multi-billion dollar-backed expectations that they would be able to decide how best to employ their networks to serve consumers and deterring network investment. " "Just as a newspaper is entitled to decide which content to publish and where, broadband providers may feature some content over others," Verizon further said.

Read More »

W3C finalizes Pointer Events web API spec, but Apple and Google’s lack of support is a deal-breaker (Peter Bright/Ars Technica)

The Pointer Events specification , an API for Web developers to handle touch, mouse, and pen inputs in Web applications, has been published as a Recommendation by the World Wide Web Consortium. This is the Web standards group's final, mutually agreed on version of the spec. Pointer Events was first proposed by Microsoft as an alternative to another specification, Touch Events. Touch Events was born from Apple's initial work to touch-enable Safari on the iPhone. W3C moved to standardize it without Apple's involvement, and at one point during Touch Events' development , it looked as if the spec would be covered by Apple-owned patents, with Apple unwilling to offer a royalty free grant for users of the spec. Had this situation continued, it would have precluded W3C from issuing the spec as a recommendation. Pointer Events avoided the patent issues. It was also a more general specification; while Touch Events was designed for touch and touch alone, Pointer Events allowed developers to use similar code to handle touch, stylus/pen, and mouse inputs. Pointer Events also addressed certain problems with Touch Events, such as a 300 millisecond delay before responding to taps in order to disambiguate between single and double taps. While the patent issue was resolved—W3C decided that Apple's patents didn't cover Touch Events anyway—work on Pointer Events continued in parallel, backed not just by Microsoft, but also by Mozilla, jQuery, and at one time, Google. Mozilla Firefox and Internet Explorer both implement Pointer Events

Read More »

Revenge porn boss wants Google to remove his "identity related" info (David Kravets/Ars Technica)

What do you do if you're a revenge porn site operator and the Federal Trade Commission has barred you from publishing nude images of people without their consent? You demand  that Google remove from its search engine links to news accounts about the FTC's action and other related stories, citing "unauthorized use of photos of me and other related information." Craig Brittain—the former operator of revenge porn site IsAnybodyDown.com—is invoking the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) in a bid to remove 23 links in all—an irony-filled DMCA takedown request that Google is ignoring. One of the links renders the FTC's press release in January about its enforcement against Brittain. Another is a link to Ars' story about the FTC's move: " Sleazy 'revenge porn' site is banished to settle federal charges ." In addition to claims that the links contain "unauthorized" information about him, Brittain asserts "unauthorized use of statements and identity related information. Unauthorized copying of excerpts from isanybodydown.com. Using photos which are not 'fair use.'" Further Reading The DMCA requires Internet companies like Google to remove links to infringing content at a rights holder's request or face legal liability. In this instance, fair use and general First Amendment principles are on Google's and the media's side. Brittain's takedown requests likely wouldn't even qualify for removal in Europe under the

Read More »