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Tag Archives: emoji

Google is resurrecting blob emoji again

Fans of Google's now-dead blob emoji have a reason to be happy today. The company announced that it's resurrecting its cute, flatly designed characters, albeit as a sticker pack for Gboard and Android Messages, as spotted by The Verge. What's the occ...

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Google is resurrecting blob emoji again

Fans of Google's now-dead blob emoji have a reason to be happy today. The company announced that it's resurrecting its cute, flatly designed characters, albeit as a sticker pack for Gboard and Android Messages, as spotted by The Verge. What's the occ...

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Apple emoji will soon include people with curly hair, white hair and superpowers

In honor of World Emoji Day (yes, that’s a thing), Apple is previewing some of its upcoming emoji. Later this year, Apple’s emoji set will feature people with a variety of hairstyles and colors, including curly hair, red hair and white hair. What you’re about to see are simply Apple’s take on emoji that were previously approved by the Unicode Consortium’s emoji subcommittee . Folks with curly hair, rejoice! Let’s hear it for the redheads   Like white on rice   No hair? No problem Other fun emoji include a freezing face, peacock, mango, lobster, nazar amulet, superheroes and kangaroo. Back in March, Apple proposed new emojis to represent people with disabilities  in Unicode’s next batch of emoji. Then in May, Unicode announced some of the draft candidates for its next emoji release in Q1 2019  to include some of Apple’s proposed emoji, which featured a guide dog, an ear with a hearing aid and more. If you want to hear more about what goes into emoji approval, be sure to check out this interview with Jeremy Burge, vice-chair of the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee.  

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Why isn’t there a birth control emoji?

In June 2018, there will be 2,823 emoji in the Unicode Standard -- the global specification that ensures characters are interpreted the same across platforms. But nowhere in that list -- which has everything from zombies (both male and female!) to sm...

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Looks like Google is changing Android’s gun emoji into a water gun

Back in 2016, Apple swapped out the graphic used for its gun emoji, replacing the realistically drawn handgun with a bright green water gun. Just a few days ago, Twitter followed suit . And now, it seems, so will Google . The gun emoji on Android will likely soon appear as a bright orange and yellow super soaker lookalike. As first noted by Emojipedia , Google has just swapped the graphics in its open Noto Emoji library on GitHub. These are the Emoji that Android uses by default, so the same change will presumably start to roll out there before too long. At this point, Google making this change seemed inevitable. It seemed likely to happen as soon Apple made the jump; once others started following suit (Twitter earlier this week, and Samsung with the release of the Galaxy S9) it became a certainty. It’s a matter of clarity in communication. If a massive chunk of people (iOS users) can send a cartoony water toy in a message that another massive chunk of people (Android users) receive as a realistically drawn handgun, there’s room for all sorts of trouble and confusion. Apple wasn’t going to reverse course on this one — and now that others have made the change, Google would’ve been the odd one out.

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Twitter replaces its gun emoji with a water gun

Twitter has now followed Apple’s lead in changing its pistol emoji to a harmless, bright green water gun. And in doing so, the company that has struggled to handle the abuse, hate speech and harassment taking place across its platform, has removed one of the means for online abusers to troll their victims. The change is one of several rolling out now in Twitter’s emoji update, Twemoji 2.6 , which impacts Twitter users on the web, mobile web, and on Tweetdeck. Below: Apple’s water gun Below: Twitter’s water gun The decision to replace an emoji of a weapon to a child’s toy was seen as a political statement  when Apple in 2016 rolled out its own water gun emoji  in iOS 10.  The company had also argued against the addition of a rifle emoji, ultimately leading to the Unicode’s decision to remove the gun from its list of new emoji candidates that same year. With these moves, Apple was effectively telling people that a gun didn’t have a place in the pictorial language people commonly use when messaging on mobile devices. These sorts of changes matter because of emoji’s ability to influence culture and its function as a globally understood form of communication. That’s why so much attention is given to those emoji updates that go beyond the cosmetic – like updates that offer better representations of human skin tones, show different types of family groupings or relationships, or those give various professions – like a police officer or a scientist – both male and female versions, for example. In the case of the water pistol, Apple set a certain standard that others in the industry have since followed. Samsung also later replaced its gun with a water gun , as did WhatsApp . Google, meanwhile, didn’t follow Apple’s lead saying that  it believed in cross-platform communication

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Twitter replaces its gun emoji with a water gun

Twitter has now followed Apple’s lead in changing its pistol emoji to a harmless, bright green water gun. And in doing so, the company that has struggled to handle the abuse, hate speech and harassment taking place across its platform, has removed one of the means for online abusers to troll their victims. The change is one of several rolling out now in Twitter’s emoji update, Twemoji 2.6 , which impacts Twitter users on the web, mobile web, and on Tweetdeck. Below: Apple’s water gun Below: Twitter’s water gun The decision to replace an emoji of a weapon to a child’s toy was seen as a political statement  when Apple in 2016 rolled out its own water gun emoji  in iOS 10.  The company had also argued against the addition of a rifle emoji, ultimately leading to the Unicode’s decision to remove the gun from its list of new emoji candidates that same year. With these moves, Apple was effectively telling people that a gun didn’t have a place in the pictorial language people commonly use when messaging on mobile devices. These sorts of changes matter because of emoji’s ability to influence culture and its function as a globally understood form of communication. That’s why so much attention is given to those emoji updates that go beyond the cosmetic – like updates that offer better representations of human skin tones, show different types of family groupings or relationships, or those give various professions – like a police officer or a scientist – both male and female versions, for example. In the case of the water pistol, Apple set a certain standard that others in the industry have since followed. Samsung also later replaced its gun with a water gun , as did WhatsApp . Google, meanwhile, didn’t follow Apple’s lead saying that  it believed in cross-platform communication . Many others left their realistic gun emojis alone, too, including Microsoft. “The main problem with the different appearances of the pistol emoji has been the potential for confusion when one platform displays this as an innocuous toy, and another shows the same emoji as a weapon.

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