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Axios Autonomous Vehicles – Axios

Axios Axios Autonomous Vehicles Axios Just ask Blackberry . What's next: Ford is using its commercial vehicles expertise to develop routing and dispatch technology for fleet management, and is building out a transportation-as-a-service platform to integrate with its business partners. The ... and more »

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Council Rock South senior develops mobile application for hospital communication – The Intelligencer

The Intelligencer Council Rock South senior develops mobile application for hospital communication The Intelligencer Another application he built, a music sharing app called Vibe, got more than 10,000 downloads after being featured on Mashable as App of the Day in 2015, Randy said. Those previous apps he developed are no longer operational because he hasn't ... and more »

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Antonym Synonyms DictionaryPro (Reference)

Antonym Synonyms DictionaryPro 1.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Reference Price: $.99, Version: 1.1 ( iTunes ) Description: Synonyms and Antonyms A to Z:- This app contains both the Synonym and Antonym for a particular word, With the help this app can learn synonym and antonym , *************** Features *************** * Over 13,000 Synonyms Antonyms entries with definition and usage. * Having "listen word" button to play the word. * Share button to Share word with friends. * Search Option to search any particular word. * Works completely offline! No internet connection needed! Perfect for your studies! What's New minor issue fixed Antonym Synonyms DictionaryPro

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Why engineers are looking to animals for new technology

As a race, human beings have a lot of shortcomings. We’re not very fast, not all that strong and while we have been able to create technology that helps us overcome our environments, we’re not very good at adapting to them. Animals, on the other hand, have been successfully adapting and evolving to meet the world’s challenges long before we were stumbling around. While it might be too late for us to learn these lessons ourselves from our animal counterparts, it’s not too late to pass them on to our inventions. And biomimetic and bio-inspired labs across the world are doing just that. “If you think about mobility technology in the engineering world, we have airplanes in the air, ships in the water, but none of these technologies are available without our artificial modification of the environment,” Dr. Sangbae Kim, associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT and director of the university’s Biomimetic Robotics Laboratory, told TechCrunch. “Animals have evolved to be the best at mobility, because, for most of them, it’s critical for survival.” Crafting technology to mimic nature is nothing new, Kim says. From developing aerodynamic technology to small conveniences like Velcro, humans have been taking a cue from the natural world for as long as we’ve been inventing. The field of engineering, says Kim, has this kind of inspiration as an intrinsic feature and it will be crucial to solving problems such as disaster reconnaissance, labor and even elderly care. “This is technology we must have,” says Kim. “Not just something cool to have.” With new technological developments, this kind of inspired design has gone far beyond Velcro in recent years. Cheetah 3 A prodigy of Kim’s lab, the Cheetah 3 is a 90 pound rescue robot  designed to traverse terrain that is dangerous or inaccessible to humans (e.g. power plant inspection of natural disaster reconnaissance) with cat-like reflexes and motion. Its predecessors have been able to make autonomous running leaps over obstacles in their path (granted, at a considerably slower speed than its namesake) and Cheetah 3 has the added functionality to complete all these tasks while blind.

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Robotics-as-a-service is on the way and inVia Robotics is leading the charge

The team at inVia Robotics didn’t start out looking to build a business that would create a new kind of model for selling robotics to the masses, but that may be exactly what they’ve done. After their graduation from the University of Southern California’s robotics program, Lior Alazary, Dan Parks, and Randolph Voorhies, were casting around for ideas that could get traction quickly. “Our goal was to get something up and running that could make economic sense immediately,’ Voorhies, the company’s chief technology officer, said in an interview. The key was to learn from the lessons of what the team had seen as the missteps of past robotics manufacturers. Despite the early success of iRobot , consumer facing or collaborative robots that could operate alongside people had yet to gain traction in wider markets. Willow Garage , the legendary company formed by some of the top names in the robotics industry had shuttered just as Voorhies and his compatriots were graduating, and Boston Dynamics , another of the biggest names in robotics research, was bought by Google around the same time — capping an six-month buying spree that saw the search giant acquire eight robotics companies. “ In the midst of all this we were looking around and we said, ‘God there were a lot of failed robotics companies!’ and we asked ourselves why did that happen?” Voorhies recalled.  “A lot of the hardware companies that we’d seen, their plan was: step one build a really cool robot and step three: an app ecosystem will evolve and people will write apps and the robot will sell like crazy. And nobody had realized how to do step 2, which was commercialize the robot.” So the three co-founders looked for ideas they could take to market quickly. The thought was building a robot that could help with mobility and reaching for objects. “We built a six-degree-of-freedom arm with a mobile base,” Voorhies said.

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Apeel Sciences is combating food waste with plant-derived second peels

In a world bursting with abundances like self-driving cars and robotic personal assistants , you would think that basic needs like sustainable food sourcing and distribution would be a problem of the past. But that couldn’t be further from the truth. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) , every year roughly a third — 1.3 billion tons — of food grown for consumption is lost or wasted. In industrialized countries like the U.S., this results in a loss of $680 billion per year, and in countries without standardized infrastructure (such as proper cooling systems), this results in a loss of $310 billion per year. Among the billions of tons of food lost per year, the largest percentage is in vital, nutrient-rich foods like fruits and vegetables and roots and tubers (such as potatoes and carrots), each seeing about 45 percent wasted annually. There are many factors responsible for food waste, including poorly regulated “Best By” and “Sell By” dates in the U.S. that tempt fickle customers into wasting otherwise good food, and unreliable or non-existent cooling distribution systems in less-industrialized countries. But an underlying cause of both of these issues, especially for easily spoiled foods, is the inherent shelf life of the food itself. And that’s where Apeel Sciences steps in . The California-based startup is combating food waste by using plant-derived materials from food itself to create an extra protective barrier to prolong its life and stave off spoilage — essentially, creating a second peel. To create it, farmers just add water to Apeel’s protective powder and apply it to produce as a spray or wash. For founder and CEO James Rogers, who was working on a PhD in materials engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara when he was inspired to create Apeel Sciences, the solution to the problem of quickly spoiled food could be found by looking to a problem science had already solved: rust. “Factors that cause spoilage are water loss and oxidation,” Rogers told TechCrunch.

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BenQ PD2700Q 27-inch QHD review – Camera Jabber (press release) (blog)

Camera Jabber (press release) (blog) BenQ PD2700Q 27-inch QHD review Camera Jabber (press release) (blog) ... computer , and with most of us making the switch to using laptops this can mean that your machine is connected to multiple wires. On the BenQ PD2700Q, those multiports under the screen can be used to plug in USB devices such as a keyboard , mouse and ...

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A pickaxe for the AI gold rush, Labelbox sells training data software

Every artificial intelligence startup or corporate R&D lab has to reinvent the wheel when it comes to how humans annotate training data to teach algorithms what to look for. Whether it’s doctors assessing the size of cancer from a scan or drivers circling street signs in self-driving car footage, all this labeling has to happen somewhere. Often that means wasting six months and as much as a million dollars just developing a training data system. With nearly every type of business racing to adopt AI, that spend in cash and time adds up. Labelbox builds artificial intelligence training data labeling software so nobody else has to. What Salesforce is to a sales team, Labelbox is to an AI engineering team. The software-as-a-service acts as the interface for human experts or crowdsourced labor to instruct computers how to spot relevant signals in data by themselves and continuously improve their algorithms’ accuracy. Today, Labelbox is emerging from six months in stealth with a $3.9 million seed round led by Kleiner Perkins and joined by First Round and Google’s Gradient Ventures. “There haven’t been seamless tools to allow AI teams to transfer institutional knowledge from their brains to software,” says co-founder Manu Sharma. “Now we have over 5,000 customers, and many big companies have replaced their own internal tools with Labelbox.” Kleiner’s Ilya Fushman explains that “If you have these tools, you can ramp up to the AI curve much faster, allowing companies to realize the dream of AI.” Inventing the best wheel Sharma knew how annoying it was to try to forge training data systems from scratch because he’d seen it done before at Planet Labs, a satellite imaging startup. “One of the things that I observed was  that  Planet Labs has a superb AI team, but that team had been for over six months building labeling and training tools. Is this really how teams around the world   are approaching building AI?,” he wondered

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Magic Leap details what its mixed reality operating system will look like

Magic Leap just updates its developer documentation with a host of new details and imagery, sharing more specifics on how the company’s Lumin OS will look like on their upcoming Magic Leap One device. It’s mostly a large heaping of nitty gritty details, but we also get a more prescient view into how Magic Leap sees interactions with their product looking like and the directions that developers are being encouraged to move in. Worth noting off the bat that these gifs/images appear to be mock-ups or screenshots rather than images shot directly through Magic Leap tech. Alright, first, this is what the Magic Leap One home screen will apparently look like, it’s worth noting that it appears that Magic Leap will have some of its own stock apps on the device, which was completely expected but they haven’t discussed much about. Also worth noting is that Magic Leap’s operating system by and large looks like most other operating systems, they seem to be well aware that flat interfaces are way easier to navigate so you’re not going to be engaging with 3D assets just for the sake of doing so. Here’s a look at a media gallery app on Magic Leap One. Here’s a look at an avatar system. The company seems to be distinguishing between two basic app types for developers: immersive apps and landscape apps. Landscape apps like what you see in the image above, appear to be Magic Leap’s version of 2D where interfaces are mostly flat but have some depth and live inside a box called a prism that fits spatially into your environment. It seems that you’ll be able to have several of these running simultaneously. Immersive apps, on the other hand, like this game title,  Dr .  Grordbort — which Magic Leap has been teasing for years — respond to the geometry of the space that you are in and is thus called an immersive app. Here’s a video of an immersive experience in action. Make your own derpy gravity defying driving game using this #Magicleap developer lesson in #Unity ! https://t.co/P70P4kCtvG pic.twitter.com/H4VGXXVPTN — Giant Space Turtle (@GST_naomi) July 26, 2018 Moving beyond apps, the company also had a good deal to share about how you interact with what’s happening in the headset. We got a look at some hand controls and what that may look like.

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Magic Leap details what its mixed reality OS will look like

Magic Leap just updated its developer documentation and a host of new details and imagery are being spread around on Reddit and Twitter, sharing more specifics on how the company’s Lumin OS will look like on their upcoming Magic Leap One device. It’s mostly a large heaping of nitty-gritty details, but we also get a more prescient view into how Magic Leap sees interactions with their product looking and the directions that developers are being encouraged to move in. Worth noting off the bat that these gifs/images appear to be mock-ups or screenshots rather than images shot directly through Magic Leap tech. Alright, first, this is what the Magic Leap One home screen will apparently look like, it’s worth noting that it appears that Magic Leap will have some of its own stock apps on the device, which was completely expected but they haven’t discussed much about. Also worth noting is that Magic Leap’s operating system by and large looks like most other operating systems, they seem to be well aware that flat interfaces are way easier to navigate so you’re not going to be engaging with 3D assets just for the sake of doing so. Here’s a look at a media gallery app on Magic Leap One. Here’s a look at an avatar system. The company seems to be distinguishing between two basic app types for developers: immersive apps and landscape apps. Landscape apps like what you see in the image above, appear to be Magic Leap’s version of 2D where interfaces are mostly flat but have some depth and live inside a box called a prism that fits spatially into your environment. It seems that you’ll be able to have several of these running simultaneously. Immersive apps, on the other hand, like this game title,  Dr .  Grordbort — which Magic Leap has been teasing for years — respond to the geometry of the space that you are in and is thus called an immersive app.

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