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Tag Archives: hack

How facial recognition is being used to monitor animals: detecting sickness in salmon, gauging diet of cattle, protecting elephants from poachers, and…

Mack DeGeurin / New York Magazine : How facial recognition is being used to monitor animals: detecting sickness in salmon, gauging diet of cattle, protecting elephants from poachers, and more   —  Facial recognition technology has some serious, persistent issues.  These were clearly shown earlier this year when Amazon's …

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Egyptian law enforcement is using the country’s new law against "fake news" to imprison women who share their sexual harassment experiences…

Rossalyn Warren / WIRED UK : Egyptian law enforcement is using the country's new law against “fake news” to imprison women who share their sexual harassment experiences on social platforms   —  Social media accelerated Egypt's revolution.  Now those same services have become a tool of control for a repressive regime

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Private equity firm Thoma Bravo has agreed to buy cybersecurity company Imperva for $2.1B in cash; the deal is expected to close by early 2019…

Reuters : Private equity firm Thoma Bravo has agreed to buy cybersecurity company Imperva for $2.1B in cash; the deal is expected to close by early 2019   —  (Reuters) - Buyout firm Thoma Bravo LLC has agreed to buy Imperva Inc (IMPV.O) for $2.1 billion in cash, adding the cybersecurity firm …

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Inside DARPA’s neurotechnology research program for healing and enhancement of the human body and mind through neural implants and brain-machine…

Michael Joseph Gross / The Atlantic : Inside DARPA's neurotechnology research program for healing and enhancement of the human body and mind through neural implants and brain-machine interfaces   —  I. Who Could Object?  —  “Tonight I would like to share with you an idea that I am extremely passionate about,” the young man said.

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How US got China to scale back cyber espionage in 2015 by publicly charging Chinese hackers, arresting a spy in Canada, and taking a firm stance in…

Garrett M. Graff / Wired : How US got China to scale back cyber espionage in 2015 by publicly charging Chinese hackers, arresting a spy in Canada, and taking a firm stance in negotiations   —  For years, China has systematically looted American trade secrets.  Here's the messy inside story of how DC got Beijing to clean up its act for a while.

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Court denies Lime’s request for a temporary restraining order to block Skip and Scoot from deploying their electric scooters in San Francisco on…

Megan Rose Dickey / TechCrunch : Court denies Lime's request for a temporary restraining order to block Skip and Scoot from deploying their electric scooters in San Francisco on Monday   —  A judge today denied Lime's request for a temporary restraining order that would block Skip and Scoot from deploying their electric scooters in San Francisco on Monday.

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Consultants advise law enforcement officers not to look at iPhone screens because it may trigger Face ID too many times and iPhones may revert to…

Joseph Cox / Motherboard : Consultants advise law enforcement officers not to look at iPhone screens because it may trigger Face ID too many times and iPhones may revert to passcodes   —  After five failed attempts with the ‘wrong’ face, Apple's Face ID system will fall back to asking a passcode; a tricky situation for investigators.

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Here’s how to see if you’re among the 30 million compromised Facebook users

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | NurPhoto ) The attackers who carried out the mass hack that Facebook disclosed two weeks ago obtained user account data belonging to as many as 30 million users, the social network said on Friday. Some of that data—including phone numbers, email addresses, birth dates, searches, location check-ins, and the types of devices used to access the site—came from private accounts or was supposed to be restricted only to friends. The revelation is the latest black eye for Facebook as it tries to recover from the scandal that came to light earlier this year in which Cambridge Analytica funneled highly personal details of more than 80 million users to an organization supporting then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. When Facebook disclosed the latest breach two weeks ago, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he didn’t know if it allowed attackers to steal users’ private data. Friday’s update made clear that it did, although the 30 million people affected was less than the 50 million estimate previously given. Readers can check this link to see what, if any, data was obtained by the attackers. On a conference call with reporters, Vice President of Product Management Guy Rosen said that at the request of the FBI, which is investigating the hack, Facebook isn’t providing any information about who the attackers are or their motivations or intentions. That means that for now, affected users should be extra vigilant when reading emails, taking calls, and receiving other types of communications. The ability to know the search queries, location check-ins, phone numbers, email addresses, and other personal details of so many people gives the attackers the ability to send highly customized emails, texts, and voice calls that may try to trick people into turning over money, passwords, or other high-value information. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Attempted DNC voter database hack was a false alarm, security chief says

An apparent hacking attempt on the Democratic National Committee’s voter database was a false alarm, the organization has said. CNN and the Associated Press  reported on Wednesday, citing an unnamed party official, that the political organization was warned of an attempt on its systems. DNC officials contacted the FBI after Lookout, a security firm, detected and reported a phishing page that replicated a login page for NGP VAN , a technology provider for Democratic campaigns. But the party’s security chief quickly reversed its position Thursday, confirming that the phishing page was “simulated.” “The test, which mimicked several attributes of actual attacks on the Democratic party’s voter file, was not authorized by the DNC… or any of our vendors,” said Bob Lord, DNC’s chief security officer, in a statement. Just a day earlier, he briefed Democratic officials on the apparent incident in Chicago on Wednesday. It’s believed that the Michigan Democratic Party asked a third party to conduct the test without clearance or authorization from the DNC, according to one reporter . In the case of phishing attacks, hackers attempt to obtain the username and password for sensitive internal systems by tricking staff into entering their credentials on spoofed sites. Hackers can then reuse those credentials to log in themselves. Mike Murray, Lookout’s vice president of security intelligence who originally informed the DNC of the phishing page, said in a tweet that, “you don’t know that they’re false until you’ve showed up to investigate.” It’s not uncommon for political parties to store vast amounts of information on voters. Political parties and national committees often use the data to target voters with political messaging. In recent years, several voter databases have leaked or  were exposed on unprotected servers for anyone to find. Earlier this week, Microsoft said it thwarted an attempt by a Russian-backed advanced persistent threat group known as Fancy Bear (or APT28) to steal data from political organizations.

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Animoto hack exposes personal information, geolocation data

Animoto, a cloud-based video maker service for social media sites, has revealed a data breach. The breach occurred on July 10 but was confirmed by the company in early August, and later reported to the California attorney general. Names, dates of birth and user email addresses were accessed by hackers, but the company said it wasn’t known if data had been exfiltrated. The company also said that users’ scrambled passwords were exposed in the breach, but it wasn’t clear if the hackers gained the private key, which could be used to reveal the passwords in plain text. The company also said in a security announcement that user geolocations were also exposed to hackers, but noted that it “does not keep geolocation information for all users.” Payment data is not thought to be affected as it’s stored in a separate system, the company said. Animoto did not immediately return a request for comment. TechCrunch will update once we learn more. The New York City-based company did not say how many users were affected by the breach, but last August claimed more than 20 million users on its platform. Animoto is the latest social media service to be breached. Last month, Timehop revealed a breach affecting 21 million users , exposing their names, email addresses, gender and dates of birth . Timehop’s breach was largely attributable to the company’s lack of two-factor authentication on its network, which helps prevent hackers from reusing already exposed credentials from breaches of other sites and services. Animoto didn’t say how its breach occurred but pointed to “suspicious activity” on its systems. The company also said it reset employee passwords and reduced employees’ access to critical systems.

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