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Tag Archives: huawei

Australia bans Huawei and ZTE from supplying technology for its 5G network

Australia has blocked Huawei and ZTE from providing equipment for its 5G network, which is set to launch commercially next year. In a tweet, Huawei stated that the Australian government told the company that both it and ZTE are banned from supplying 5G technology to the country, despite Huawei’s assurances that it does not pose a threat to national security. We have been informed by the Govt that Huawei & ZTE have been banned from providing 5G technology to Australia. This is a extremely disappointing result for consumers. Huawei is a world leader in 5G. Has safely & securely delivered wireless technology in Aust for close to 15 yrs — Huawei Australia (@HuaweiOZ) August 22, 2018 Earlier today, the Australian government issued new security guidelines for 5G carriers . Although it did not mention Huawei, ZTE or China specifically, it did strongly hint at them by stating “the Government considers that the involvement of vendors who are likely to be subject to extrajudicial directions from foreign government that conflict with Australian law, may risk failure by the carrier to adequately protect a 5G network from unauthorized access or interference.” Concerns that Huawei, ZTE and other Chinese tech companies will be forced to comply with a new law, passed last year , that obligates all Chinese organizations and citizens to provide information to national intelligence agencies when asked have made several countries wary of using their technology. Earlier this month, the United States banned the use of most Huawei and ZTE technology by government agencies and contractors, six years after a Congressional report first cited the two companies as security threats. In its new security guidelines, the Australian government stated that differences in the way 5G operates compared to previous network generations introduces new risks to national security. In particular, it noted the diminishing distinctions between the core network, where more sensitive functions like access control and data routing occur, and the edge, or radios that connect customer equipment, like laptops and mobile phones, to the core. “This new architecture provides a way to circumvent traditional security controls by exploiting equipment in the edge of the network – exploitation which may affect overall network integrity and availability, as well as the confidentiality of customer data. A long history of cyber incidents shows cyber actors target Australia and Australians,” the guidelines stated. “Government has found no combination of technical security controls that sufficiently mitigate the risks.” Last year, Australia introduced the Telecommunications Sector Security Reforms (TSSR) , which takes effect next month and directs carriers and telecommunication service providers to protect their networks and infrastructure from national security threats and also notify the government of any proposed changes that may compromise the security of their network. It also gives the government the power to “intervene and issue directions in cases where there are significant national security concerns that cannot be addressed through other means.” Huawei’s Australian chairman John Lord said in June that the company had received legal advice that its Australian operations are not bound to Chinese laws and he would refuse to hand over any data to the Chinese government in breach of Australian law.

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New defense bill bans the U.S. government from using Huawei and ZTE tech

U.S. government agencies will be forbidden from using certain components or services from several Chinese tech firms, including Huawei and ZTE. The ban was signed into law today by President Trump as part of the Defense Authorization Act and will go into effect over the next two years. The bill covers anything that is a “substantial or essential component of any system,” as well as tech that is used to route or view user data. So even though it doesn’t mandate an outright ban on Huawei and ZTE products, it still means many government workers or contractors, or companies that want to do business with the government, will have to jettison much of their current technology. The Defense Authorization Act also directs U.S. agencies to allocate funding to companies that need to replace equipment as a result of the new bill. Last month, ZTE struck a deal with the Commerce Department to lift a denial order that was put in place after it violated sanctions against North Korea and Iran. The denial order, barring ZTE from working with American suppliers, would have seriously damaged its business and was a major point of contention in the U.S.-China trade war. Lawmakers on both sides of the political aisle opposed the deal and continue to view ZTE as a security threat, but Senate Republications abandoned an attempt to re-impose sanctions on the company last month , which paved the way for the less severe provision in the Defense Authorization Act. TechCrunch has contacted Huawei and ZTE for comment. Huawei and ZTE, in particular, have been singled out as national security threats by the U.S. since a Congressional report in 2012 . But the ban also covers video surveillance and telecommunications hardware produced by Hytera Communications, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Company and Dahua Technology Company, all Chinese firms.

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