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Tag Archives: medicine

SPIE Announces the BreastPathQ Cancer Cellularity Challenge to Develop…

The international society for optics and photonics, along with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), conducts its third Grand Challenge... (PRWeb October 17, 2018) Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/spie_announces_the_breastpathq_cancer_cellularity_challenge_to_develop_automated_methods_for_analyzing_tumor_burden_assessment_in_breast_pathology/prweb15849164.htm

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The top 10 startups from Y Combinator’s Demo Day S18 Day 2

Fifty-nine startups took the stage at Y Combinator’s Demo Day 2 , and among the highlights were a company that helps developers manage in-app subscriptions; a service that lets you create animojis from real photos; and a surplus medical equipment-reselling platform. Oh… and there was also a company that’s developed an entirely new kind of life form using e coli bacteria. So yeah, that’s happening. Based on some investor buzz and what caught TechCrunch’s eye, these are our top picks from the second day of Y Combinator’s presentations. You can find the full list of companies that presented on Day 1 here , and our top picks from Day 1 here.  64-x With a founding team including some of the leading luminaries in the field of biologically inspired engineering (including George Church, Pamela Silver and Jeffrey Way from Harvard’s Wyss Institute),  64-x  is engineering organisms to function in otherwise inaccessible environments. Chief executive Alexis Rovner, herself a post-doctoral fellow at the Wyss Institute, and chief operating officer Ryan Gallagher, a former BCG Consultant, are looking to commercialize research from the Institute around accelerating and expanding the ability to produce functionalized proteins and sequence-defined polymers with diverse chemistries. Basically they’ve engineered a new life form that they want to use for novel kinds of bio-manufacturing. Why we liked it:  These geniuses invented a new life form. CB Therapeutics Sher Butt, a former lab directory at Steep Hill, saw that cannabinoids were as close to a miracle cure for pain, epilepsy and other chronic conditions as medicine was going to get. But plant-based cannabinoids were costly and produced inconsistent results. Alongside Jacob Vogan, Butt realized that biosynthesizing cannabinoids would reduce production costs by a factor of 10 and boost production 24 times current yields. With a deep experience commercializing drugs for Novartis and as the founder of the cannabis testing company SB Labs, Butt and his technical co-founder are uniquely positioned to bring this new therapy to market. Why we liked it:  Using manufacturing processes to make industrial quantities of what looks like nature’s best painkiller at scale is not a bad idea. RevenueCat RevenueCat  helps developers manage their in-app subscriptions. It offers an API that developers can use to support in-app subscriptions on iOS and Android, which means they don’t have to worry about all the nuances, bugs and updates on each platform

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Nvidia debuts GeForce RTX 2000 GPU series with RTX 2070, RTX 2080, RTX 2080 Ti, claiming up to "6 times more performance" than last gen,…

Tom Warren / The Verge : Nvidia debuts GeForce RTX 2000 GPU series with RTX 2070, RTX 2080, RTX 2080 Ti, claiming up to “6 times more performance” than last gen, shipping begins Sept 20   —  $1,199 for Nvidia's fastest GeForce card  —  Nvidia is unveiling its new GeForce RTX 2000 series of graphics cards at Gamescom in Germany today.

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Giphy refreshes its homepage to feature sets of GIFs around different trending topics, curated by an editorial team, called Stories (Anna…

Anna Hensel / VentureBeat : Giphy refreshes its homepage to feature sets of GIFs around different trending topics, curated by an editorial team, called Stories   —  Giphy, the search engine for GIFs, is rolling out a redesigned homepage today to capitalize on GIFs' reputation for capturing memorable moments from live events.

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Skype launches end-to-end encrypted conversations out of preview, but feature is opt-in and users’ private messages don’t sync across devices…

Pradeep / MSPoweruser : Skype launches end-to-end encrypted conversations out of preview, but feature is opt-in and users' private messages don't sync across devices   —  Back in January, Microsoft announced the preview of end-to-end encrypted Private Conversations on Skype.  When you chat with someone using …

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Skype launches end-to-end encrypted conversations out of preview, but feature is opt-in and users’ private messages don’t sync across devices…

Pradeep / MSPoweruser : Skype launches end-to-end encrypted conversations out of preview, but feature is opt-in and users' private messages don't sync across devices   —  Back in January, Microsoft announced the preview of end-to-end encrypted Private Conversations on Skype.  When you chat with someone using …

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The FDA OK’d an app as a form of birth control

Don’t want to get pregnant? There’s a Food and Drug Administration approved app for that. The FDA has just given the go ahead for Swedish app Natural Cycles to market itself as a form of birth control in the U.S. Natural Cycles was already in use as a way to prevent pregnancy in certain European countries. However, this is the first time a so-called ‘digital contraceptive’ has been approved in America. The app works using an algorithm based on data given by women using the app such as daily body temperature and monthly menstrual cycles. It then calculates the exact window of days each month a woman is most fertile and therefore likely to conceive. Women can then see which days the app recommends they should avoid having sex or use protection to avoid getting pregnant. Tracking your cycle to determine a fertile window has long been used to either become pregnant or avoid conceiving. However, Natural Cycles put a scientific spin on the age-old method by evaluating over 15,000 women to determine its algorithm had an effectiveness rate with a margin of error of 1.8 percent for “perfect use” and a 6 percent failure rate for “typical use.” What that means is almost two in every 100 women could likely conceive on a different date than the calculated fertile window. That’s not exactly fool-proof but it is higher than many other contraceptive methods. A condom, for instance, has an 18 percent margin of error rate, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) . And though the app makers were able to convince the FDA of its effectiveness, at least one hospital in Stockholm has opened an investigation with Sweden’s Medical Products Agency (MPA) after it recorded 37 unwanted pregnancies among women who said they had been using the app as their contraception method. “Consumers are increasingly using digital health technologies to inform their everyday health decisions, and this new app can provide an effective method of contraception if it’s used carefully and correctly,” assistant director for the health of women in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health Terri Cornelison said in a statement

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