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Tag Archives: messaging

Doug Leone, the global managing partner of powerhouse Sequoia Capital, is coming to Disrupt

Sequoia Capital has been at the top of its game in the U.S. for decades, thanks to early investments in Google, Yahoo, LinkedIn and PayPal, as well as, more recently, its stakes in the messaging startup WhatsApp, the payments company Stripe and the video conferencing unicorn company Zoom. Yet unlike a lot of top-tier firms in Silicon Valley, Sequoia is far from reliant on the Bay Area companies for huge returns. Instead, a dozen years ago, anticipating that the most impactful tech ideas could come from anywhere and be built around the world, the firm founded Sequoia China and Sequoia India, assembling local teams to invest in startups and help founders build their companies. That strategy is now paying off, big time. As we reported earlier this week, Sequoia currently makes more than 50 cents from every dollar returned to its investors from its overseas bets. Among the many companies  Sequoia Capital China  alone has funded: Meituan-Dianping, the group-discount service that sells locally found products and retail services and just  filed to go public  in Hong Kong; Ele.me, the food ordering company that sold a controlling stake in its business to Alibaba in April for  $9.5 billion ; DJI, the drone company, which was reported to be raising $1 billion in new funding this spring at a  $15 billion valuation ; VIP.com, the commerce platform that  went public  in 2012 and currently boasts a $7.2 billion market cap; and Didi, the mobile transportation giant that’s in a race against its U.S. rival Uber to conquer the global ride-hailing market. To learn more about the new reality facing Silicon Valley startups — that competition is no longer next door, it’s global — we’re thrilled to announce that Sequoia Managing Partner Doug Leone is coming to Disrupt for a fireside chat. Leone oversees the firm’s global operations with Neil Shen, the founder and managing partner of Sequoia Capital China, and he knows better than nearly anyone in Silicon Valley how the investing and technology landscapes are evolving — and what founders globally should be mindful of as they build the next legendary company. Leone also knows the value of grit. Leone immigrated to the U.S. from Italy and was reportedly called “Pasta” in high school  before rising to the top of one of the most admired venture firms in history. It’s no wonder Leone is particularly passionate about founders from humble backgrounds like his own. If you care about the global shifts that are majorly reshaping the tech industry right now, and the stuff that great founders are made of, you’re going to want to catch this conversation.

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macOS update delivers Messages in iCloud

Don't panic, Mac users -- just because Apple only released iOS 11.4 at first doesn't mean it has forgotten about you. The company has posted a macOS High Sierra 10.13.5 update that supports Messages in iCloud, providing both more consistent chat sync...

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Google starts migrating all G Suite users from Hangouts to Meet

Google today announced that starting now, it is moving all of its G Suite users who follow its recommended schedule from its Hangouts video chat service to Hangouts Meet , the more enterprise-ready version of Hangouts. The move will likely take about a month or so. This means all newly created Calendar invites will now link to Meet video meetings, though Google stresses that all previously created meetings won’t be affected by this. For the time being, admins can still opt out of this transition and some may want to do so, simply because Meet doesn’t support Internet Explorer and Safari right now, for example (support for Firefox launched last week). But starting in the second half of 2018, Google expects that Meet will have full parity with Hangouts, including support for these browsers, and, at that time, Meet will become the default for these stragglers, too. Google’s overall messaging strategy remains as confusing as always. The original plan was to position Allo and Duo as its consumer text and video chat apps while Meet and the more Slack-like Hangouts Chat played to its enterprise users. Allo was a total failure, however, and its preferred messaging app now seems to be Chat, which will offer support for the new RCS standard and give Android users a more iMessage-like experience — or at least that’s what Google hopes. But to complicate matters, Hangouts is also still around in the consumer sphere and has generally done quite well. As for Duo, I don’t know anybody who uses it, but it’s hanging in there. At least if you’re a business user, though, the story is pretty simple: Meet is your new video chat service and Hangouts Chat is Google’s chat service for you. And then when you get home, you can just use iMessage or Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp or WeChat or Viber or Signal or Telegram or, if you insist, Hangouts. Google goes after Slack and splits Hangouts into Chat and Meet

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Discord nearly tripled its user base in one year

If it wasn't already evident that Discord is becoming a staple of playing (and watching) games, it is now. The chat platform is marking its third birthday this week with word that its user base has nearly tripled in the space of a year, jumping from...

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WhatsApp helps you keep up with group chats

Group chats are virtually essential to WhatsApp -- it's not uncommon for families or even community organizations to use it for staying in touch. To that end, WhatsApp is adding a string of features that help you keep abreast of group chats, whether...

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Signal for Mac users should disable notifications to keep their messages secure

If you’re using Signal for secure messaging, here’s something to be aware of. The app is one of the best-regarded encrypted messaging tools out there, but Mac owners who use Signal might inadvertently be putting their privacy at risk. As Motherboard reports, security researcher Alec Muffett discovered that Signal messages sent to a Mac can persist in the notifications center, even if you have the app’s settings tuned to delete them. #HEADSUP : #Security Issue in #Signal . If you are using the @signalapp desktop app for Mac, check your notifications bar; messages get copied there and they seem to persist — even if they are "disappearing" messages which have been deleted/expunged from the app. pic.twitter.com/CVVi7rfLoY — Alec Muffett (@AlecMuffett) May 8, 2018 That fact suggests that otherwise private messages live on in the operating system, which is something other researchers are looking into at the moment. (some) of your disappearing Signal msgs are belong to us Msgs may remain in the UI of macOS's Notification Center (as @AlecMuffett noted) – and also stored in user-readable OS database. Blog post explains why, how to recover/decode msgs, & mitigations: https://t.co/kUwrcbsCSr — patrick wardle (@patrickwardle) May 9, 2018 It’s a serious concern for anyone who relies on the Signal Mac app, but remember: to take advantage of this flaw, a hacker would need to compromise or obtain your Mac, and by then it’s probably game over. To turn off the setting — and we recommend that you do — go to the Settings menu within the Signal for Mac app and select either “Neither name nor message” or “Disable notifications” to make sure that your private messages don’t stray beyond Signal.

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Signal for Mac users should disable notifications to keep their messages secure

If you’re using Signal for secure messaging, here’s something to be aware of. The app is one of the best-regarded encrypted messaging tools out there, but Mac owners who use Signal might inadvertently be putting their privacy at risk. As Motherboard reports, security researcher Alec Muffett discovered that Signal messages sent to a Mac can persist in the notifications center, even if you have the app’s settings tuned to delete them. #HEADSUP : #Security Issue in #Signal . If you are using the @signalapp desktop app for Mac, check your notifications bar; messages get copied there and they seem to persist — even if they are "disappearing" messages which have been deleted/expunged from the app. pic.twitter.com/CVVi7rfLoY — Alec Muffett (@AlecMuffett) May 8, 2018 That fact suggests that otherwise private messages live on in the operating system, which is something other researchers are looking into at the moment. (some) of your disappearing Signal msgs are belong to us Msgs may remain in the UI of macOS's Notification Center (as @AlecMuffett noted) – and also stored in user-readable OS database. Blog post explains why, how to recover/decode msgs, & mitigations: https://t.co/kUwrcbsCSr — patrick wardle (@patrickwardle) May 9, 2018 It’s a serious concern for anyone who relies on the Signal Mac app, but remember: to take advantage of this flaw, a hacker would need to compromise or obtain your Mac, and by then it’s probably game over. To turn off the setting — and we recommend that you do — go to the Settings menu within the Signal for Mac app and select either “Neither name nor message” or “Disable notifications” to make sure that your private messages don’t stray beyond Signal.

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Adobe: Experiencing the experiential, part one

The Adobe Experience Cloud Summit 2018 in March was a clear indication of how far Adobe has come in the past two years and how far it has to go. I look at the event, the strategy, the messaging, the program, and the experience itself to see if Adobe can truly make the claim it is in the business of helping businesses create experiences. True or false? Find out.

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Telegram blocked in Iran as the government orders telecoms to cut off access

As Moscow erupts in protests over its own ban , Iran’s judiciary has just ordered the nation’s telecommunications providers to block Telegram . According to the Wall Street Journal , Iran’s Islamic Republic News Agency stated that the decision was issued via a court ruling in Tehran. An estimated 40 million Iranians — half of the country’s population — use Telegram to communicate. “Considering various complaints against Telegram social networking app by Iranian citizens, and based on the demand of security organisations for confronting the illegal activities of Telegram, the judiciary has banned its usage in Iran,” Iranian state TV reported, according to Reuters . As of Monday, Telegram appears to still be functioning in the country following the court order. When the ban is executed, the popular messaging app will join the ranks of Facebook and Twitter, two other social media platforms banned in Iran. Government employees were ordered to quit the app earlier this month and the Iranian government launched its own Telegram competitor, a messaging app called Soroush , last week. In January, Iran temporarily restricted Telegram access, ostensibly to quell anti-government demonstrations. When bans have occurred in the past, tech-savvy Iranians have turned to proxy services and other tools to keep connected. The net effect of the temporary ban of @Telegram in Iran last winter was the two-fold increase of the number of Psiphon (one of the popular anti-filtering apps in Iran) users. The number of daily users increased 10-fod during the ban. @arashzd @hooshmandk pic.twitter.com/MydSL8EfUA — Taha Yasseri (@TahaYasseri) April 30, 2018 In the past, Iran has suggested that it would allow Telegram and other messaging apps to operate domestically if they transferred their data servers into the country rather than storing data abroad.

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