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Tag Archives: police

Huawei Wants To Be The First To Release A Foldable Smartphone – Ubergizmo – Nigerian Bulletin

Nigerian Bulletin Huawei Wants To Be The First To Release A Foldable Smartphone – Ubergizmo Nigerian Bulletin It has long been rumored that Samsung is working on a foldable smartphone. The company is expected to finally release its long-awaited device early next year. However, Huawei is reportedly rushing to be the first to market with a foldable smartphone, ... Samsung Working On High-End 'Galaxy F' Series Ubergizmo all 33 news articles »

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In the public sector, algorithms need a conscience

Brian Brackeen Contributor Share on Twitter Brian Brackeen is the chief executive officer of the facial recognition software developer Kairos . More posts by this contributor Facial recognition software is not ready for use by law enforcement In a recent MIT Technology Review article , author Virginia Eubanks discusses her book Automating Inequality. In it, she argues that the poor are the testing ground for new technology that increases inequality— highlighting that when algorithms are used in the process of determining eligibility for/allocation of social services, it creates difficulty for people to get services, while forcing them to deal with an invasive process of personal data collection. I’ve spoken a lot about the dangers associated with government use of face recognition in law enforcement, yet, this article opened my eyes to the unfair and potentially life threatening  practice of refusing or reducing support services to citizens who may really need them — through determinations based on algorithmic data. To some extent, we’re used to companies making arbitrary decisions about our lives — mortgages, credit card applications, car loans, etc. Yet, these decisions are based almost entirely on straight forward factors of determination — like credit score, employment, and income. In the case of algorithmic determination in social services, there is bias in the form of outright surveillance in combination with forced PII share imposed upon recipients. Eubanks gives as an example the Pittsburgh County Office of Children, Youth and Families using the Allegheny Family Screening Tool (AFST) to assess the risk of child abuse and neglect through statistical modeling. The use of the tool leads to disproportionate targeting of poor families because the data fed to the algorithms in the tool often comes from public schools, the local housing authority, unemployment services, juvenile probation services, and the county police, to name just a few — basically, the data of low-income citizens who typically use these services/interact with them regularly. Conversely, data from private services such as private schools, nannies, and private mental health and drug treatment services — isn’t available. Determination tools like AFST equate poverty with signs of risk of abuse, which is blatant classism— and a consequence of the dehumanization of data. Irresponsible use of AI in this capacity, like that of its use in law enforcement and government surveillance, has the real potential to ruin lives. Taylor Owen, in his 2015 article titled  The Violence of Algorithms , described a demonstration he witnessed by intelligence analytics software company Palantir, and made two major points in response — the first being that oftentimes these systems are written by humans, based on data tagged and entered by humans, and as a result are “chock full of human bias and errors.” He then suggests that these systems are increasingly being used for violence. “What we are in the process of building is a vast real-time, 3-D representation of the world.

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Hackers Steal 600 Gallons Of Gas In Detroit – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Hackers Steal 600 Gallons Of Gas In Detroit Ubergizmo Local news reports from Detroit reveal that the police are looking for two suspects who allegedly managed to steal 600 gallons of gasoline from a gas station by hacking a gas pump. The theft is valued at around $1,800 and it took place in the middle of ... and more »

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Under its new rules, Facebook reveals some details of the political ads about the SCOTUS nomination, but the money behind some groups buying ads…

Kevin Roose / New York Times : Under its new rules, Facebook reveals some details of the political ads about the SCOTUS nomination, but the money behind some groups buying ads remains opaque   —  Even before President Trump's new Supreme Court nominee is announced, a fight over the choice is raging on social media.

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Updated California law now requires businesses to set clear auto-renewal terms for digital subscriptions and allow customers to cancel online (Abrar…

Abrar Al-Heeti / CNET : Updated California law now requires businesses to set clear auto-renewal terms for digital subscriptions and allow customers to cancel online   —  A California law that went into effect July 1 is aimed at making it easier for customers to cancel their subscriptions online.

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Inside DOD’s Jyn Erso initiative that is giving technically skilled soldiers an opportunity to build tech for the Army alongside experts from the…

Issie Lapowsky / Wired : Inside DOD's Jyn Erso initiative that is giving technically skilled soldiers an opportunity to build tech for the Army alongside experts from the private sector   —  NICOLE CAMARILLO WAS touring the Army base at Fort Meade, Maryland in early 2017 when a young captain—I'll call him Matt …

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Instagram tests questions in Stories

Instagram has been incredibly busy of late, announcing IGTV , Instagram Lite and a slate of features including Stories Soundtracks . But the Facebook-owned photo sharing service doesn’t show any signs of letting up. Android Police today noted that Instagram is testing a feature that would allow users to post questions to their followers and receive answers. Instagram already offers the ability to publish polls to followers with multiple-choice options for answering. But this test seems to point toward the option to offer lengthier responses to user’s questions. One user in Indonesia sent a screencap of the feature in to Android Police (pictured above), and a user in Spain also spotted the feature. That said, we still have very little information on just how this might work. Right now, when a user posts to their Story, their followers can respond via DM. With more open-ended questions and responses, it’s unclear if responses will still come in via DM or be bundled together as part of the story. The latter seems more in keeping with Instagram’s push to make Stories as interactive as possible. The open-ended question could serve as a jumping off point for a collaborative story comprised of everyone’s responses.

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In London, Uber has won the battle but risks losing the war

Bradley Tusk Contributor Bradley Tusk is the founder and CEO of Tusk Ventures . More posts by this contributor Shockingly, Congress acted responsibly in regulating autonomous cars… So what’s next? When don’t f*** with people’s cars became don’t f*** with people’s phones The sighs of relief are palpable. Uber can keep operating in London . With 3.6 million customers, 45,000 drivers, and a slew of reforms, changes and concessions already made to Transport for London (TfL), most observers expected Uber to win a reprieve – and they did. Uber passed the first of two tests. The second test is a little less obvious – and a lot harder. Being able to navigate the political climate in Europe demands that Uber not only demonstrate contrition, but implement real change too. But if Uber loses sight of who the end user is, winning the battle in London doesn’t eliminate the risk of losing the entire war everywhere. Here’s the thing: regulation is neither inherently good nor bad. Taxi regulation wasn’t all fundamentally evil and corrupt when Travis Kalanick ran Uber and it’s not all fundamentally necessary and appropriate under Dara Khosrowshahi’s reign either. That’s because there are no laws of nature on how ridesharing – or even transit in any form – should operate. It’s all a series of choices, priorities, and trade-offs between competing public and private needs and capabilities. It’s just a question of getting people from point A to point B in the most efficient, cost effective way possible. That’s it.

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Uber is in court to appeal London license loss by claiming it’s changed

Uber is in court in the UK today to try to overturn a decision by London’s transport regulator last fall to withdraw its license to operate in the city — where it claims to have some 3.5 million regular users. Its appeal is being heard in Westminster Magistrates Court from today, with the hearing expected to last for several days. The company can continue to operate its service in London while it appeals the decision. Transport for London (TfL) sent shockwaves through the ride-hailing giant last September when it rejected Uber’s application to renew its license on the grounds the company is “not fit and proper to hold a private hire operator licence” — a long history of rule-defying behavior finally catching up with the company. TfL criticized the company’s approach and conduct, saying it demonstrated “a lack of corporate responsibility in relation to a number of issues which have potential public safety and security implications” — including how it reported serious criminal offenses, and explanations it gave for its use of proprietary software (called Greyball) which it had developed internally to try to prevent officials from undertaking regulatory or law enforcement duties. Notably, the court will be deciding whether Uber is fit and proper to hold an operator license at the time of the appeal hearing — rather than determining whether TfL made the right call to refuse a renewal last year. So operational changes Uber has made since then will be taken into consideration. In its favored media mouthpiece — the London Evening Standard newspaper, whose editor, George Osborne, consults for major Uber investor, BlackRock — Uber’s UK general manager Tom Elvidge has been given space for a lengthy op-ed where he admits the company “got things wrong along the way” before setting out the case for Uber having turned over a new leaf. “Over the past year we’ve been working hard to put right past mistakes as we’ve gone through a much-needed period of reflection and change,” he writes. “Our new global CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, is establishing a new culture and direction for the company from the top, while in the UK we’ve brought in three experienced independent directors to help us stay on the right track. If there are times when we fall short, we are committed to being open, taking responsibility for the problem, and fixing it.” Talking to Politico last month, Khosrowshahi — the Uber outsider tasked last  summer  with cleaning up its problematic legacy under founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick — said technology companies need to take greater responsibility or prepare to have responsibility imposed upon them by more regulation. “We’re open to doing business with cities in the way in which cities want to do business,” he told the publication. “We’re not going to be absolutist in our approach, we will adjust on a local basis.” “This was a company that had a very particular culture that worked for it during the unbelievable growth years, during the startup phase.

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