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Tag Archives: resources

Host Compliance and STR Helper to Merge, Accelerating Innovation &…

Merger Creates Market-Leading Company with the Financial, Engineering and Customer Support Resources Needed to Deliver the Full Suite of Data, Software and Services Governments Need to... (PRWeb February 25, 2019) Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/host_compliance_and_str_helper_to_merge_accelerating_innovation_improving_local_governments_ability_to_make_the_sharing_economy_work_for_everyone/prweb16122446.htm

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Provance IT Service Management expands Cloud Service Management for…

Provance IT Service Management expands Cloud Service Management to include Azure ARM Resources, now letting the Service Desk view and manage nearly everything that resides in Microsoft Azure within... (PRWeb January 16, 2019) Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/provance_it_service_management_expands_cloud_service_management_for_microsoft_azure_monitoring_and_management_abilities/prweb16033370.htm

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New ransomware rakes in $4 million by adopting a “big game hunting” strategy

(credit: Tracy O / Flickr ) A recently discovered ransomware group has netted almost $4 million since August, in large part by following a path that’s uncommon in its industry—selectively installing the malicious encryption software on previously infected targets with deep pockets. The method differs from the usual one of indiscriminately infecting all possible victims. That’s the take of two analyses published Thursday, one by security firm CrowdStrike and the other by competitor FireEye . Both reports say that Ryuk, as the ransomware is known, infects large enterprises days, weeks, or as much as a year after they were initially infected by separate malware, which in most cases is an increasingly powerful trojan known as Trickbot. Smaller organizations infected by Trickbot, by contrast, don’t suffer the follow-on attack by Ryuk. CrowdStrike called the approach “big-game hunting” and said it allowed its operators to generate $3.7 million worth of Bitcoin across 52 transactions since August. Besides pinpointing targets with the resources to pay hefty ransoms, the modus operandi has another key benefit: the “dwell time”—that is, the period between the initial infection and the installation of the ransomware—gives the attackers time to perform valuable reconnaissance inside the infected network. The reconnaissance lets attackers CrowdStrike dubs Grim Spider maximize the damage it causes by unleashing the ransomware only after it has identified the most critical systems of the network and obtained the passwords necessary to infect them. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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American Financial Resources, Inc.’s Wholesale Division to Offer…

Partnership aims to integrate the power of Floify's mortgage automation solution with American Financial Resources, Inc.’s robust technology offerings to further enhance the broker-borrower... (PRWeb October 17, 2018) Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/american_financial_resources_inc_s_wholesale_division_to_offer_floifys_digital_mortgage_point_of_sale_solution_to_its_network_of_broker_partners/prweb15834480.htm

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Monetizing computing resources on the blockchain

Ben Dickson Contributor Ben Dickson is a software engineer and the founder of TechTalks . More posts by this contributor Unlocking the potential of eye tracking technology Can you trust crypto-token crowdfunding? A while back, a blockchain startup approached me with their pitch, a decentralized social media application in which users can earn money by simply doing what they already do on other platforms, such posting updates, photos and videos. I would have been intrigued had they sent me the message a couple of years ago. But not so much after observing the space for more several years. Several blockchain applications profess to enable users to monetize various resources, whether it’s their unused storage and CPU power, or the tons of data they generate every day. Regardless of whether they will succeed to deliver on their promises or not, these projects highlight one of the problems that haunts the centralized internet. Users are seldom rewarded for the great value they bring to platforms such as Facebook, Google and Amazon . Blockchain applications suggest that decentralized alternatives to current services will give users the chance to collect their fair share of the revenue they generate with their participation in online ecosystems. It’s an enticing proposition since it doesn’t require users to do much more than what they’re already doing: send emails, browse websites, watch ads, keep the computer on… But what exactly do you earn from monetizing your resources on the internet, and how accessible and reliable are your earning? Here’s what you need to know. What can you sell? A handful of blockchain platforms enable you to rent your unused storage, idle CPU cycles, and internet bandwidth with those who are in need. The premise is simple: You list your resources along with your payment terms on the application and get paid in the proprietary crypto-token of the application when others use them

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Airtable raises $52M to give non-coders tools to build complex software

A massive company probably has plenty of engineers on staff and the resources to build a complex backbone of interconnected information that can contain tons of data and make acting on it easy — but for smaller companies, and for those that aren’t technical, those tools aren’t very accessible. That’s what convinced Howie Liu to create Airtable, a startup that looks to turn what seems like just a normal spreadsheet into a robust database tool, hiding the complexity of what’s happening in the background while those without any programming experience create intricate systems to get their work done. Today, they’re trying to take that one step further with a new tool called Blocks, a set of mix-and-match operations like SMS and integrating maps that users can just drop into their systems. Think of it as a way to give a small business owner with a non-technical background to meticulously track all the performance activity across, say, a network of food trucks by just entering a bunch of dollar values and dropping in one of these tools. “We really want to take this power you have in software creation and ‘consumerize’ that into a form anyone can use,” Liu said. “At the same time, from a business standpoint, we saw this bigger opportunity underneath the low-code app platforms in general. Those platforms solve the needs of heavyweight expensive use cases where you have a budget and have a lot of time. I would position Airtable making a leap toward a graphical user interface, versus a lot of products that are admin driven.” Liu said the company has raised an additional $52 million in financing in a round led by CRV and Caffeinated Capital, with participation from Freestyle Ventures and Slow Ventures. All this is going toward a way to build a system that is trying to abstract out even the process of programming itself, though there’s always going to be some limited scope as to how custom of a system you can  actually make with what amounts to a set of logic operation legos. That being said, the goal here is to boil down all of the most common sets of operations with the long tail left to the average programmers (and larger enterprises often have these kinds of highly-customized needs). All this is coming at a time when businesses are increasingly chasing the long tail of small- to medium-sized businesses, the ones that aren’t really on the grid but represent a massive market opportunity. Those businesses also probably don’t have the kinds of resources to hire engineers while companies like Google or Facebook are camping out on college campuses looking to snap up students graduating with technical majors. That’s part of the reason why Excel had become so popular trying to abstract out a lot of complex operations necessary to run a business, but at the same time, Liu said that kind of philosophy should be able to be taken a step further.

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!Heads Up!: Congress it trying to pass Bill H.R.1856 on Tuesday that removes protections of site owners for what their users post

In an attempt to stop sex trafficking, congress is changing section 230 of Communications act of 1934, the Communicatons Decency Act of 1996. This will punish site owners for what their users post by fine or potential jail time of 20 years. The bill amends the federal criminal code to specify that the violation for benefiting from "participation in a venture" engaged in sex trafficking of children, or by force, fraud, or coercion, includes knowing or reckless conduct by any person or entity and by any means that furthers or in any way aids or abets the violation. A provider of an interactive computer service that publishes information provided by an information content provider with reckless disregard that the information is in furtherance of a sex trafficking offense shall be subject to a criminal fine or imprisonment for not more than 20 years. Link to the bill itself https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1865 This enables one troll or spammer with CP to effectively kill any website they don't like for any petty reason. Smaller sites don't have the resources or manpower to maintain surveillance over their websites unlike Reddit. This will kill smaller content creators internet wide and lose tons of great smaller communities. Spread this around and call your congressman to vote NO on the "Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act of 2017" (FOSTA) The Electronic Frontier Foundation Goes into even more detail on how that hurts smaller websites from sustaining themselves and even hurts the victims of Sex Trafficking as well https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/02/fosta-would-be-disaster-online-communities submitted by /u/KuguraSystem link comments

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