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Dropbox may be adding an e-signature feature, user survey indicates

A recent user survey sent out by Dropbox confirms the company is considering the addition of an electronic signature feature to its Dropbox Professional product, which it refers to simply as “E-Signature from Dropbox.” The point of the survey is to solicit feedback about how likely users are to use such a product, how often, and if they believe it would add value to the Dropbox experience, among other things. While a survey alone doesn’t confirm the feature is in the works, it does indicate how Dropbox is thinking about its professional product. According to the company’s description of E-Signature, the feature would offer “a simple, intuitive electronic signature experience for you and your clients” where documents could be sent to others to sign in “just a few clicks.” The clients also wouldn’t have to be Dropbox users to sign, the survey notes. And the product would offer updates on every step of the signature workflow, including notifications and alerts about the document being opened, whether the client had questions, and when the document was signed. After the signed document is returned, the user would receive the executed copy saved right in their Dropbox account for easy access, the company says. In addition to soliciting general feedback about the product, Dropbox also asked survey respondents about their usage of other e-signature brands, like Adobe e-Sign, DocuSign, HelloSign, and PandaDoc, as well as their usage other more traditional methods, like in-person signing and documents sent over mail. Given the numerous choices on the market today, it’s unclear if Dropbox will choose to move forward and launch such a product. However, if it did, the benefit of having its own E-Signature service would be its ability to be more tightly integrated into Dropbox’s overall product experience. It could also push more business users to upgrade from a basic consumer account to the Professional tier. This kind of direct integration would make sense in the context of Dropbox’s business workflows.

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There are very real differences in how women and men (and VCs) view entrepreneurship, underscores a new survey

In the increasingly crowded world of venture capital, many more firms are producing research as a way to differentiate themselves from the pack. Earlier this year, for example,  Wing,  a venture firm that focuses primarily on enterprise startups, published a state of the industrial IoT market . The consumer-tech investment firm Goodwater Capital  is becoming known for its occasional equity research report on a still-private company . Now Illuminate Ventures , a nine-year-old, woman-led, early-stage venture firm that’s focused on enterprise cloud and mobile computing startups, has produced some thought-provoking research of its own around how women and male founders view entrepreneurship, from why they do it to how much support they receive from family members. First, a little about Illuminate’s methodologies. According to firm founder Cindy Padnos, the firm initially reached out to 1,200 tech founders and venture capitalists who Illuminate presented with a litany of questions about entrepreneurship and motivations and challenges that people face in starting companies. In the end, says Padnos, Illuminate had a response rate of just more than 30 percent, or slightly over 400 completed responses, which it used SurveyMonkey tools to collect. Roughly half the responses came from partner-level VCs at 150 different venture firms; the other half came from U.S.-based founders who raised venture funding in 2017. So what did they have to say? A lot. If we’re being honest, the survey was so wide-ranging as to be a bit overwhelming. (You can check out the full paper here .) In the meantime, some of the most interesting takeaways can be grouped into a couple of different categories. One of these seems to disprove old myths. Among them: The belief that entrepreneurs launch companies chiefly for financial gain is seemingly a myth. Only 15 percent of male founders and 2 percent of the female founders who responded to the survey said that money is their primary motivation.

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SurveyMonkey has filed confidentially to go public

The IPO window continues to remain open as SurveyMonkey, which last raised money in 2014 at a $2 billion valuation, announced today that it has confidentially filed to go public . SurveyMonkey can file confidentially with the SEC through the JOBS act signed in 2012, which allows those companies to test the waters before they formally release an S-1. It’s increasingly popular as it allows the companies an opportunity to get a gut check while investors appear to have at least some of an appetite for fresh IPOs while not having to spill the entire financial guts of the company publicly. SurveyMonkey is also the latest of a wave of enterprise IPOs in the past six months or so. There’s still plenty that can change given that it’s a confidential filing. We won’t know how much money the company wants to raise, what its business even looks like, or any of the other granular details of the IPO. SurveyMonkey gives businesses a way to submit surveys to their customers and try to more seamlessly gather feedback about products, customer service, or anything else that a company might be able to measure based on those responses. In an era where tracking all of that data becomes increasingly important thanks to more robust predictive tools and considerably more processing power to make those projections, SurveyMonkey’s data is likely even more valuable than it was when it raised funding in 2014. SurveyMonkey on its own end, too, might be easily able to understand how people are actually rating the companies they work with. Dropbox and DocuSign are the most recent successful IPOs, both valued at over $10 billion at this point. But there are companies like Zuora, which went public in April , zScalar and others that have seen significant success after they went public. That means that there’s plenty of demand for companies that are about to go public, which is where the saying of the “IPO window being open” comes from.

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Ars Asks: Are your company’s IT policies flexible, or nonsensical?

Enlarge / Artist's rendition of a mobile device exceeding expectations. (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty / NASA) From time to time, Ars performs surveys to help us better understand our audience's attitudes and preferences about various things—and this is one of those times. If you're an IT decision-maker at your company, we would be grateful if you'd take a few minutes and let us know your thoughts . Here at Ars, we're lucky to have one of the most skilled and technically adept audiences of just about any tech news publication in existence: that's you fine folks! A huge number of you are what the industry calls "ITDMs," or "IT decision-makers"—that most sought-after demographic that decides (or helps decide) whose applications and hardware your employers will end up buying. In fact, no small number of the Ars staff (me included) were ITDMs themselves in a past life, and it's a role we well understand. ITDMs represent a huge cross-section of employees stretching from system administrators to "C-suite" company officers—it's a role that is often stressful and typically thankless, and it more often than not requires dealing with designed-by-committee requirements that can seem contradictory or insane. Nonetheless, the ITDM role is one around which a whole company can pivot, as the choices ITDMs make directly affect the tools and processes a company uses to generate its revenue. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Asks: Are your company’s IT policies flexible, or nonsensical?

Enlarge / Artist's rendition of a mobile device exceeding expectations. (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty / NASA) From time to time, Ars performs surveys to help us better understand our audience's attitudes and preferences about various things—and this is one of those times. If you're an IT decision-maker at your company, we would be grateful if you'd take a few minutes and let us know your thoughts . Here at Ars, we're lucky to have one of the most skilled and technically adept audiences of just about any tech news publication in existence: that's you fine folks! A huge number of you are what the industry calls "ITDMs," or "IT decision-makers"—that most sought-after demographic that decides (or helps decide) whose applications and hardware your employers will end up buying. In fact, no small number of the Ars staff (me included) were ITDMs themselves in a past life, and it's a role we well understand. ITDMs represent a huge cross-section of employees stretching from system administrators to "C-suite" company officers—it's a role that is often stressful and typically thankless, and it more often than not requires dealing with designed-by-committee requirements that can seem contradictory or insane. Nonetheless, the ITDM role is one around which a whole company can pivot, as the choices ITDMs make directly affect the tools and processes a company uses to generate its revenue. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Survey Finds iPhones Are More Popular With Teens Than Ever – Ubergizmo

Ubergizmo Survey Finds iPhones Are More Popular With Teens Than Ever Ubergizmo Knowing your demographic is a good way to create products that will appeal to that demographic, and it seems that if Apple wants to keep growing its iPhones, perhaps they should look more into pushing their phones into the hands of teens. This is based ... (PRODUCT)RED™ - iPhone 8 Special Edition - Apple Apple Virgin Mobile UK Says Apple Will Announce (PRODUCT)RED Edition iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus on Monday Mac Rumors The New iOS Update Killed Touch Functionality on iPhone 8s Repaired With Aftermarket Screens Motherboard all 541 news articles »

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